leachate recirculation

EREF Summit: Emerging Topics in Landfill Management, Columbus, Ohio

September 1, 2021

Wednesday, September 2021

Register Here for EREF’s Emerging Topics in Landfill Management Summit

 

Join EREF, Ohio EPA, and industry leaders who will cover emerging topics in landfill management with a focus on:

  • Why waste slides occur – the primary factors attributed to instability
  • Elevated temperature landfills and how they affect waste mass instability
  • State of practice of aqueous waste disposal in landfills
  • Liquids addition and leachate recirculation

The Summit will take place at the Marriott Columbus University Area in Columbus, Ohio. Rooms are $119 per night.
As with many EREF events, this will likely fill to capacity quickly.

Agenda
Welcome/Introduction (8 a.m.)

A Regulatory Agency’s Perspective on Waste Mass Instability – Part 1 (Annette De Havilland, Ohio EPA) (8:05 a.m.)

Elevated Temperature Landfills (8:30 – 10:10 a.m.; Session Moderator: Jim Walsh, SCS Engineers)
Mechanisms contributing to elevated temperatures (Craig Benson, UW)
Modeling to predict and control elevated temperature conditions (Mort Barlaz, NCSU)
State of practice to monitor and manage elevated temperatures conditions (Joe Benco, Republic Services; Greg Cekander, WM)

BREAK (10:10 – 10:40 a.m.)

Aqueous Waste Co-Disposal and Liquids Addition (10:40 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.; Session Moderator: Andy Nikodem, Golder)
Overview of aqueous waste disposal and biological compatibility (Bryan Staley, EREF; Mort Barlaz, NCSU)
Co-disposal of aqueous wastes in landfills and the impact on stability (Chris Bareither, CSU)
Liquid accumulation in landfills (Mike Beaudoin, Republic Services; Tim Mitchell, CEC)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Liquids addition/leachate recirculation: what do we know today vs. 10 years ago? (Craig Benson, UW; Terry Johnson, WM; Clarke Lundell, GFL; Debbie Reinhart, UCF; Bruce Schmucker, Ecotechky)

LUNCH (12:45 – 1:45 p.m.)

A Regulatory Agency’s Perspective on Waste Mass Instability – Part 2 (Georgia EPD) (1:45 p.m.)

Waste Stability (2:15 – 4:15 p.m.; Session Moderator: Mike Beaudoin, Republic Services)
Why waste slides occur: factors attributed to structure instability & lessons learned (Bob Bachus, Geosyntec)
Using advanced geophysical methods to characterize solid waste sites (Dan Fellon, ARM Group)
Using cone penetration testing for in-situ MSW shear strength characterization (Ed Hood, GFL; Michael Yacyshyn, CEC)
Prevention/Intervention strategies (Dan Bunnel, BLE; Bo McCoy, WM)

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:00 am

SCS Advice From the Field: Evaluation of a buried vertical well leachate recirculation system for municipal solid waste landfills.

September 8, 2016

The results demonstrated that pressurized liquids addition in vertical wells at municipal solid waste landfills can be achieved while avoiding typical operational and maintenance issues associated with seeps.

Waste Management & Research, August 1, 2016,
Authors:
Ravi Kadambala, SCS Engineers, Boca Raton, FL
Jon Powell, Gainesville, FL, USA
Karamjit Singh, Jacksonville, FL, USA
Timothy G Townsend, Gainesville, FL

Vertical liquids addition systems have been used at municipal landfills as a leachate management method and to enhance biostabilization of waste. Drawbacks of these systems include a limitation on pressurized injection and the occurrence of seepage. A novel vertical well system that employed buried wells constructed below a lift of compacted waste was operated for 153 days at a landfill in Florida, USA. The system included 54 wells installed in six clusters of nine wells connected with a horizontally oriented manifold system. A cumulative volume of 8430 m3 of leachate was added intermittently into the well clusters over the duration of the project with no incidence of surface seeps. Achievable average flow rates ranged from 9.3 × 10−4 m3 s−1 to 14.2 ×
10−4 m3 s−1, which was similar to or greater than flow rates achieved in a previous study
using traditional vertical wells at the same landfill site.

Read the entire white paper here

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am