carbon storage

Biodiesel & Renewable Diesel Summit, Minneapolis

June 13, 2022

Meet SCS Engineers professionals, including Monte Markley, Nathan Hamm, and Gary Vancil, who are attending the 3rd annual Biodiesel & Renewable Diesel Summit in Minneapolis, June 13-15, 2022.

The summit will also feature a Carbon Capture & Storage Summit preconference on June 13, as well as an added focus on liquids management.

The Biodiesel & Renewable Diesel Summit is a forum designed for biodiesel and renewable diesel producers to learn about cutting-edge process technologies, new techniques and equipment to optimize existing production, and efficiencies to save money while increasing throughput and fuel quality. Produced by Biodiesel Magazine, this world-class event features premium content from technology providers, equipment vendors, consultants, engineers and producers to advance discussion and foster an environment of collaboration and networking through engaging presentations, fruitful discussion and compelling exhibitions with one purpose, to further the biomass-based diesel sector beyond its current limitations. Co-located with the International Fuel Ethanol Workshop & Expo and the National Biomass Conference & Expo, the Biodiesel & Renewable Diesel Summit conveniently harnesses the full potential of the integrated biofuels industries while providing laser-like focus on processing methods that are sure to yield tangible advantages to biomass-based diesel producers.

Click for more details and registration information

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 12:00 am

Greenhouse Gas Fluxes and Carbon Storage Dynamics in Playa Wetlands: Restoration Potential to Mitigate Climate Change

March 31, 2016

Daniel_Dale_SCS_Engineers
Dale Daniel, SCS Engineers

Dr. Dale W. Daniel, an Associate Professional with SCS’s Oklahoma City office, recently published a summary article of his dissertation research through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Conservation Effects Assessment Project. The primary goal of the research was to provide under-standing of the potential climate mitigation services provided through wetland conservation and restoration in the High Plains region of the United States. Focus was placed on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from wetlands and adjacent upland landscapes as well as identifying some of the drivers of GHG flux that are influenced by various land management practices. The project also sought to understand how sediment removal from wetland basins influenced Carbon and Nitrogen content as well as Carbon sequestration services.

In 2007, the Society for Ecological Restoration International (SER) stated that global climate change is a real and immediate threat that requires action, and ecological restoration is one of the many tools that can help mitigate that change (SER 2007). However, recent debate within the conservation science community has arisen concerning whether restoring ecosystems for C offset projects may shift focus away from other important benefits to society (Emmett-Mattox et al. 2010). Indeed, not all ecosystem restorations make viable ecological offset projects for industries seeking to reduce their C emissions, and those that do, may not always occur in areas where restoration funding is needed the most. This study demonstrated that management practices focused on restoring natural landscape functions, including native species plantings and basin sediment removal, can increase climate mitigation services provided by wetland and upland ecosystems within a region heavily impacted by land use change.

Read the article

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:42 pm