recycling

Waste Expo, Las Vegas Convention Center

May 9, 2022

Waste 360’s annual conference and exhibits, Waste Expo, will take place at the Las Vegas Convention Center, May 9-12, 2022.

2022 Conference Tracks include:

  • Operations, Fleet & Safety
  • Recycling & Landfill
  • Business Insights & Policy
  • Technology & Innovation
  • and more!

Waste360’s popular Food Recovery Forum and the Organics Recycling Conference will again be co-located with Waste Expo.  SCS professionals are presenting at these sessions:

Pat Sullivan
Pat Sullivan
Monday, May 9, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm

Pat Sullivan, Senior Vice President, is speaking on “The Pros and Cons of Composting vs. Anaerobic Digestion,” at the Composting, Anaerobic Digestion, and Other Organics Treatment Processes – Which Is Best for Your Facility? Critical Factors in the Design Process session

Tracie Bills
Tracie Onstad Bills
Tuesday, May 10, 12:45 pm – 1:45 pm

Tracie Onstad Bills, Vice President, is a panelist for the “Update on The Future of Organics in California”.  Learn about California’s SB 1383 implementation that will require 75% diversion of organic waste from landfills by 2025. Hear from industry policy leaders and composters in an interactive panel discussion regarding collection, contamination, permitting, and markets of transforming organic wastes into compost and energy products. This lively discussion will include questions from the audience on how to develop over 100 facilities at a cost of $2 to $3 billion.

Michelle Leonard
Michelle Leonard
Tuesday, May 10th 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Michelle Leonard, Senior Vice President of Sustainability Materials Management, is speaking at “The Road to Edible Food Recovery and Reducing Organics Disposal” session.  California has passed one of the most aggressive edible food recovery policies in the world. To meet the legislative requirements, municipalities across the state are actively developing food recovery programs. This session will look at several examples of municipalities in Los Angeles County and the steps they are taking. The examples will include edible food capacity planning, identifying food generators and recovery organizations, outreach to edible food generators, gathering needed data, setting up programs and training for successful recovery, matching food recovery organizations to donors, and tracking the amount of food recovered. Additionally, this session will highlight practices to recover non-edible food through organics collection and recycling programs when food recovery is not an option.

 

Audience favorites returning to Waste Expo in 2022 include:

  • Rising Leaders Talk Trash: Waste360 40 Under 40 award winners and rising leaders will share their perspective on where the waste industry is headed. They will also discuss the biggest challenges and opportunities facing the waste industry, how they got their start in the industry, current projects and initiatives they are working on, how they see the industry changing and more.
  • People’s Choice Session- Legislative Updates by Region: “Move Over” laws, climate change, recycling, extended producer responsibility (EPR), per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), cannabis waste—the list goes on. Join this panel of experts to find out the latest legislation updates in each region across the U.S. and what you should have on your radar for 2022 and beyond.
  • Nothing Wasted! Talks. Get ready to hear inspired talks from a wide array of thought leaders and visionaries! In each session, you’ll hear from three to four thought leaders, visionaries, seekers and seers who will share impactful, inspirational, influential, or even provocative ideas. You’ll walk away with powerful ideas and perspectives that will make you a more thoughtful and creative problem-solver on the job.

 

Many SCS professionals will attend WasteExpo – we hope to see you there!  Click here for program and registration information.

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am

WIRMC – Wisconsin Integrated Resource Management Conference 2022, Green Bay

February 23, 2022

SCS Engineers is again a Silver Sponsor of the 2022 Wisconsin Integrated Resource Management Conference (WIRMC) to be held February 23-25, 2022, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Green Bay.

The conference will feature workshops and numerous sessions on sustainability and resource management practices, including the following by SCS professionals:

Chris Jimieson will co-present on “Reducing Contamination and Increasing Participation Through Community Education” (Track Session IV, Friday, 9:00 am)

Tony Kriel and Mark Huber will discuss “Solar on Landfills” (Track Session V, Friday, 10:30 am). Solar energy is one of the fastest-growing renewable energy sources in the U.S. and worldwide. With rapidly declining solar panel costs, private sector interest, and public sector incentives, the search for potential solar development sites grows every year. More and more often, closed landfills are under consideration for utility-scale solar energy facilities. In their presentation, Tony and Mark will discuss evaluating landfills for solar development potential and present a case study on one of Wisconsin’s largest solar development projects located on a landfill.

This statewide conference is jointly hosted by the Associated Recyclers of Wisconsin (AROW), the SWANA Badger Chapter, Wisconsin Counties Solid Waste Management Association (WCSWMA), and is coordinated by Recycling Connections.

The conference will also include a field trip to two state-of-the-art paper mills reclaiming recycling fibers and producing new products, networking opportunities, and an exhibitors hall in addition to the technical tracks.

Click for more details and registration information

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am

Waste360 Global Waste Management Symposium – GWMS 2022

February 14, 2022

SCS Engineers is a Silver sponsor of Waste360’s Global Waste Management Symposium on February 14-17, 2022, at the Hyatt Regency Resort & Spa in Indian Wells, California.

The program will feature numerous sessions on solid waste and materials management, such as waste minimization and reuse, landfill operation and design, organics diversion/composting/anaerobic digestion, elevated temperature landfills/subsurface reactions, climate change, greenhouse gas emissions, sustainable materials management, wastes from energy production (e.g., coal ash), waste containment and geosynthetics, odor emissions and management, leachate treatment, recycling and material markets, landfill gas production, waste-to-energy, waste characterization, and more!

GWMS services the needs of landfill owners and operators, engineers and consultants, and vendor communities. Join this broad coalition of participants that also includes four SCS Engineers presentations:

Alex StegeTuesday, Track A, Landfill Gas Emissions
Estimates of Waste Sector Greenhouse Gas and Short-Lived Climate Pollutant Emissions in Lebanon using SWEET with Alex Stege

 

Stacey DemersWednesday, Track A, Recycling
Factors that Impact Contamination in Recyclables with Stacey Demers

 

James Law

Wednesday, Track B, Solid Waste Planning
Update of ISWA’s Task Force on Closing Dumpsites Initiative – A Recent Study with James Law

 

Wednesday, Track C, Landfill Operations & Design
Landfill/dumpsite Mining and Remediation: A Review on Projects Worldwide with Gomathy Radhakrishna Iyer

 

Waste360 partnered with the Environmental Research & Education Foundation (EREF) to create a conference program that is more technical, more innovative, and more essential to you than ever before.  See for yourself!  Click for Conference Details and Registration Information

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 12:00 am

California’s first fully solar-powered compost facility shines brightly

November 9, 2021

California’s first 100% solar-powered composting facility is located on the Otay Landfill serving San Diego County.

 

In October, Republic Services’ Otay Compost Facility at the Chula Vista, California, Otay Landfill opened for business. The compost facility helps communities in San Diego County meet the requirements of California’s SB1383 law mandating the diversion of organic waste from landfills.

The composting facility designed by SCS Engineers in collaboration with Sustainable Generation operates completely off the grid using solar energy. It is the first fully solar-powered compost facility in the state and can process 100 tons of organics per day, with plans to double capacity by year-end.

Both organics recycling and reuse leaders, Republic Services hired SCS Engineers to design the Otay Compost Facility. The design uses renewable energy to run 100 percent of the composting operations at the site. The facility design includes using technologies to speed the maturation rates and reduce excessive odors. Blowers to aerate the organic material, oxygen and temperature sensors, and advanced compost cover technology produce a high-quality product.

L to R: The Republic Services Team at the Otay Landfill includes Gabe Gonzales – Operations Manager, Vidhya Viswanathan – SCS Engineers Project Director, Neil Mohr – General Manager, Marco Cervantes – Environmental Manager, Chris Seney – Organics Operations Director.

“Republic’s taken the goals of SB 1383, to reduce emissions of short-lived climate pollutants further. They’re running a sustainable facility that enables residents, businesses, and government to easily reuse and recycle more within a smaller carbon footprint than ever expected,” says Vidhya Viswanathan, engineer and project director.

As California collects and recycles organic materials from homes and businesses, local governments will use the products made from recycled organic material for compost and mulch. Recycling organic waste into compost creates a nutrient-rich soil amendment, preserving natural resources and reducing water consumption working within a circular economy. This California jurisdiction is ready for the SB1383 deadline on January 1, 2022.

“Republic Services supports California’s effort to divert food and yard waste from landfills to facilities such as this one,” said Chris Seney, Republic’s director of organics operations. “We’re grateful to SCS for their partnership in helping us bring this facility, co-located at an active landfill, to reality.”

Please watch the YouTube video to see the facility and learn more about its environmental value.

SCS Engineers is proud of helping our municipal and private clients bring the most value to their environmental solutions and communities. To learn more about SCS Engineers, view our 50th-anniversary video.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 9:19 am

Duckett Couples Engineering Expertise with Financial Acumen and Creativity

July 30, 2021

production line for the processing of plastic waste in the factory

The engineer in Ryan Duckett tends to want to build the biggest, most top-of-the-line waste and recycling facilities whenever he can, but always what is practical for his clients. SCS’s mission states that employees adopt our clients’ environmental challenges as our own, and that includes their budgets and social goals as well.

“I appreciate that the waste management enterprises I work with are businesses and care about more than the engineering of a project. They care about the economics, and they look for guidance in both realms to get maximum value and efficiency,” says Duckett, who came to SCS Engineers as a new environmental engineering graduate. Then he went back to school for his MBA. He wanted to join both the technical and financial puzzle pieces.

“Everyone, especially local governments, is constrained by tight budgets. You have to think about the interplay between design and construction and financial feasibility,” he says.

That’s his job – to plan technically sound programs and facilities, whether new builds, upgrades, or changes in operations or services. Or it can be developing protocols for clients to tap into low-carbon fuel credits.

He’s learned to look through both developers’ and operators’ eyes to help clients accomplish what they want at budget levels they set while maximizing what they get from their programs, facilities, and systems.

“You need to make assessments and quantify details to answer questions like, what would an operator have to charge for a given service to break even? Is this service fee reasonable given market conditions? What are estimated operational costs and capital costs for an expansion? Financial analysts vet these questions, but very few of them are intimately involved in solid waste practices or engineering,” Duckett says.

 

A holistic approach in play

He calls the work he does integrated solid waste management, which involves understanding the entire operation and how one component affects the other, whether routing and collections, materials recovery facilities (MRFs), transfer stations, landfill gas systems, or others.

Duckett shows this holistic approach in play by explaining how grasping the way collections work helps design transfer stations. These major builds can run up to multimillions, even when project managers have the skill set and foresight to plan for efficiency and sustainability.

“You can better estimate how to design queuing space, how to design surge capacity, how to size facilities,” he explains.

“Adding, for example, an extra day’s storage capacity at a transfer station or MRF provides extra flexibility in the event of a disruption farther down the line. In an emergency, owners could potentially save significantly by having more time to identify or negotiate more economical alternatives.”

Some of the solutions he finds are simple but require thinking out of the box—literally in one situation where cardboard boxes were stockpiling at a convenience center because they didn’t fit through the slot in a single-stream receptacle. Simply creating an acceptance area only for boxes diverts multiple truckloads a week from landfills and generates thousands a year in revenue.

Then there are the major construction projects where Duckett digs deeper, such as one plan to site, design, and build a MRF. He conducted a feasibility study looking at different sites and calculated estimated operational costs and upfront capital costs for each identified site.

“We ultimately determined that by co-locating a facility at the existing landfill, the client would save over $200,000 in operating costs, with savings from scales/scale house reuse, the reduced distance of residual stream hauling, labor efficiencies, and other areas.”

In this same scenario, adding robotics for additional processing comes with anticipated savings of about $300,000 in manual sorting costs annually.

 

When do you recommend spending more upfront?

This question often comes up in Duckett’s world.

He finds that sometimes spending more upfront and on what’s built to last translates to substantial savings in the long run. He reflects on when a client had to replace a transfer station floor every couple of years.

“These floors take so much impact, so this is not an uncommon problem. But you can provide a huge ROI by reducing floor replacement frequency. They can run over half a million to replace properly, even for relatively small facilities,” Duckett says.

He ran budget numbers for different approaches and found in this scenario the higher-end approach, cement with additives such as fly ash, was the better deal.

“It might cost 50 percent more upfront, but the floor could last three times as long, breaking the cycle of frequent, costly replacement,” he says.

 

What do you recommend when budgets are so tight, there’s no cash reserve to invest?

Duckett and his team have found solutions in this scenario, too; often, the strategy is to figure out if a phased approach is possible.

“You could spend ten years waiting to generate enough funds to build infrastructure for a major project. Your citizens are missing out, so sometimes it’s best to build smaller, as soon as you need it. Then increase capacity as you can afford it.”

 

Expert advice from his colleagues

A very positive thing about his holistic approach is that Duckett can reach out to his colleagues who specialize in long-term financial management plans for utilities such as solid waste. This team, led by Vita Quinn, specializes in helping clients build sustainable financing models and plans.

The models help communities manage financial impacts such as COVID disruptions; make investments without burdening community budgets, and help take advantage of commodity market swings such as in the value of recycled paper. Models are useful to show community leaders and citizens the different options and what-if scenarios that make sense based on current and future conditions.

 

Going back to the drawing board to improve a system

Not long ago, Duckett’s team had to figure out what to do about a decal-based, pay-as-you-throw system that wasn’t working. The operator’s initial plan seemed logical and simple: residents purchase decals and place them on their bins for pick up. But some of them let their subscriptions expire. The city was losing money servicing outstanding accounts. It hired enforcement officers to check every decal for validity, which soon proved too labor-intensive.

“We found an alternative: adding fees for trash and recycling to the water and sewer bill. It’s bringing in more revenue. And the city is saving on hours spent checking thousands of decals, freeing the enforcement officers for other jobs, like bulky and yard waste enforcement,” Duckett says.

 

Duckett’s greatest lessons learned?

“In my seven years on the job, I have learned that the solid waste industry is complicated with a lot of intricate, moving parts that interconnect. Who would have thought trash was so complex?”

He’s also learned it’s critical to have comprehensive teams with diverse backgrounds to gather different perspectives.

“It goes back to the concept that you need more than engineering expertise to deliver that value add. That value add is important to our customers, so we strive to understand the business challenge along with the technical and social goals.”

Speaking as a young professional to other young professionals and students thinking about careers in waste management, he says: Check it out. Give it serious thought.

“I do not know of another industry that involves so many interesting disciplines: biology, hydrology, geology, engineering … even data and computer scientists.”

He shares this proposition for the young and ambitious:

“As technology advances and regulatory requirements heighten, our teams learn a lot on the job. But we appreciate our sharp graduates who bring the latest knowledge from academic settings. We depend on them to share new ways of thinking and help us solve challenging and intriguing problems.”

His motivation to get into environmental engineering evolved from his passion for the outdoors.

“I grew to appreciate conservation, which centers on doing more with less to preserve resources. Nothing is wasted in nature; everything is cyclical and gets used,” Duckett says.

“That’s what our waste system could emulate, and as a nation, we’re moving in that direction. It’s not just about reducing trash. It’s about reducing wasted effort and money spent beyond what’s necessary. It goes back to the idea of efficiency and getting the most out of something – instead of a using-disposing-buying new mentality.”

 

Learn more about comprehensive MRF and Transfer Station infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SWANA Virtual Sustainable Materials Management Summit

June 15, 2021

The Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) is hosting a virtual Sustainable Materials Management Summit on Tuesday, June 15.

This half-day virtual event will bring together the recycling, organics recovery, and resource management professionals. Industry leaders will discuss new US EPA recycling goals, food waste & organics recovery, pandemic responses, and lessons that can be applied as we move forward.

A bonus session at 1:30 pm ET, features case studies of successful SMM programs implemented to address:

  • Edible Food Recovery,
  • Organics Processing,
  • Recycling Contamination and Collection, and
  • Financing SMM Programs.

 

Visit the summit website for details and to register.

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 1:00 pm

Air & Waste Management Association’s ACE 2021 is Virtual

June 14, 2021

The Air & Waste Management Association’s 114th Annual Conference and Exhibition (ACE) will be held virtually, June 14-17, 2021.  The conference theme is “Environmental Resiliency for Tomorrow”.

The conference was originally scheduled to take place in Orlando, however in the interest of safety, conference organizers have created a fully-virtual, interactive format with unparalleled technical content delivered through many livestream sessions, on-demand videos, and recorded presentations, as well as interactive Q&A and networking opportunities for authors, attendees, sponsors, and exhibitors.  There are also special events for women, students, and young professionals.

ACE 2021 will unite professionals from major industry, private sector, consulting, government and education for an exciting event that will explore the ever-expanding environmental challenges and provide solutions to becoming and remaining resilient for tomorrow. This is an ideal opportunity for professionals to share their knowledge to advance the industry, and for environmental companies to showcase their products, services, and solutions with professionals motivated to build a more resilient and sustainable world.

The livestream program will feature 23 technical sessions, including:

  • EPA Priorities 2021‐2022
  • PFAS Emerging Contaminant Regulatory Trends, Research and Remediation Updates
  • New Source Review (NSR): Issues and Recent Developments
  • Energy-Water-Waste Nexus
  • Regional Haze and Aerosol Optical Properties
  • Electric Power industry ‐ Clean Air Act Accomplishments
  • PM2.5 Implementation Issues
  • AERMOD Modeling System Updates with U.S. EPA
  • Corporate Sustainability: Plans, Programs, Metrics, and Analytics
  • Climate Risk, Modelling, and MET data
  • E‐Enterprise for the Environment
  • How Does it Work? Recycling
  • Innovative Uses of Earth observations within NASA HAQAST v2.0
  • Waste Issues Roundtable
  • PM, VOC, NOx and Mercury Control Technologies

Technical program highlights:   

  • The live Keynote Plenary Session will feature high level representatives from the Biden administration that will discuss their plans to tackle climate change as well as industry representatives that will share their vision on facing the climate challenges of the future.
  • 51st Annual Critical Review (live) on Cancer and PFOA, by Scott M. Bartell and Verónica M. Vieira, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of California, Irvine.
  • The Mini-Symposium on Environmental Resiliency  
  • Over 25 panels featuring experts who will discuss the latest issues in technology and regulation including:
    • Per and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS)
    • EPA Priorities 2021-2022
    • New Source Review
    • GHG/CO2 Control Technologies & Strategies
    • Regional Haze and Aerosol Optical Properties
    • COVID-19 Impacts
    • Clean Air Act Accomplishments for the Electric Power Industry
    • Air Permitting, Legislation, and Policy Developments
  • How Does It Work? Introductory Sessions for young professionals and students 
    • How Does It Work? Solid Waste and Recycling
    • How Does It Work? Energy Production
    • How Does It Work? Environmental, Social, Governance
    • How Does It Work? Stack Testing
  • Combined technical and student poster session with audio and video recordings, live Q & A and more

Register today!  Registration is open and conference details are taking shape.  Click for updates and registration information.

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 12:00 am

How Kirkwood, Missouri is Reducing Recycling Contamination

March 16, 2021

We all enjoy a success story, especially when it comes to reducing contamination in recyclable materials. Congratulations to the city and citizens for their Clean/Green campaign with its many benefits. Bill Bensing, Director of Public Services in Kirkwood, takes us through his journey in this timely APWA Reporter article.

 

Read Research and Education Sustain Recycling in Kirkwood, Missouri, with the click of a button!

 

Additional Resources:

As it does nationwide, Florida’s aspirational 75% recycling goal presents unique challenges and opportunities. Specifically, Florida municipal policymakers and professional staff are wrestling with contamination and changing global commodity markets that affect the financial viability of their recycling programs…

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources – WDNR is performing a waste sort to determine what’s in the trash going into Wisconsin’s landfills. During the waste audit, the team will collect at least 200 samples of waste from 12 waste disposal sites across the state for eight weeks. It’s a dirty …

Cities have begun to “right-size” their recycling systems by evaluating the usage of community recycling containers and reducing/redistributing containers to maximize the quantity of recyclables each site receives. Communities are evaluating curbside recycling programs to increase efficiency, and decreasing contamination is a priority…

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Wisconsin Integrated Resource Management Conference Goes Virtual in February 2021

February 22, 2021

The Wisconsin Integrated Resource Management Conference (WIRMC) is the place to market your business to Wisconsin solid waste and recycling professionals.  WIRMC 2021 will take place as a virtual conference from February 22-25, 2021.  Several SCS professionals will be presenter, and SCS Engineers is a Gold Level sponsor of this important event.  Please stop by our Virtual booth!

Featured Hot Topics and Speakers include:

 

2020 Wisconsin Statewide Waste Characterization Study (Monday, Feb 22)
Speaker: Casey Lamensky, WDNR and Betsy Powers, SCS Engineers

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) has sponsored statewide waste sorts in 2002, 2009, and 2020. The 2020 study is being performed in October through December 2020 by SCS Engineers. This presentation will hit on the highlights of the project (participating facilities and methodology), share challenges and how they were addressed, and present some preliminary results and how the DNR hopes to use the information. We will discuss patterns that are standing out and lessons that can be shared.

School Sustainability Programs: Thriving in Changing Times – Panel (Tuesday, Feb 23)

Panelists include: Angeline Koch, Milwaukee Public Schools, Claire Oleksiak, Sustain Dane, Chris Jimieson, Madison Metropolitan School District, Janet Whited, Recycling Specialist, San Diego USD, moderator Debbi Dodson, Carton Council

Landfill Technology Innovations: YPs Improving Operations and Management (Tuesday, Feb 23)
Speakers: David Hostetter, Joy Stephens, Melissa Russo, and Sam Rice all of SCS Engineers

The technologies for operating and monitoring landfills are expanding and changing rapidly.  Hear from several SCS Young Professionals about the exciting developments currently underway.

Food Recycling and Rescue – A Major City’s Three-Pronged Approach (Wednesday, Feb 22)
Speaker: Michelle Leonard, Vice President, SCS Engineers

Los Angeles County’s unincorporated area is home to almost 1 million people, and each year its communities dispose of approximately 128,000 tons of food. At the same time, approximately 1 in 7 individuals are food insecure, lacking regular access to quality nutritious meals. In the last three years, Los Angeles County Public Works has launched a number of programs to reduce wasted food. These include in-house recycling, food scraps collection, and edible food recovery. These programs have saved millions of pounds of food from going to waste. We will provide attendees with detailed information on food recycling and donation. Details will include how the programs were envisioned, the planning process undertaken by the County, the program results, and the County’s next steps, and will provide suggestions for how other communities can implement a successful food recycling and donation program.

Changing Air Rules for Landfills (Thursday, Feb 25)
Speaker: Mark Hammers, SCS Engineers

On March 26, 2020, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) finalized amendments to the 2003 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. The NESHAP rules affect air permits and landfill gas system operating requirements for most active landfills. Some of the changes, like revised wellhead operational standards, may be welcomed by permittees. Other changes include additional monitoring requirements for wells operating at higher temperatures, and correction and clarification of Startup, Shutdown, and Malfunction (SSM) requirements. State agencies with air permitting authority are now incorporating the new NESHAP requirements into Title V permits. The interaction between the recently amended NESHAP rules and existing New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) rules (Subpart WWW and Subpart XXX) is creating some unique challenges. Learn about these unique challenges along with the history, applicability, timelines, and primary requirements of the revised NESHAP.

 

Click for more information and to register

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 12:00 pm

SWANA WASTECON 2021 Virtual Event – Embracing Disruption

January 26, 2021

The solid waste and recycling industry is being reshaped by powerful forces – fiscal uncertainty, a critical need for infrastructure investment, local governments pushed to engage in creative city-to-city and public/private partnerships, and the need to leverage technology to connect to our communities and customers. “When we embrace disruptions, we can lean in and make decisions that help accelerate needed solutions and sunset legacy practices that can stand in the way of progress,” said SWANA Deputy Executive Director Meri Beth Wojtaszek. “This has some leaders replacing the phrase ‘before and after’ to ‘before and faster.’”

Visit WASTECON.org for program updates and registration information as it becomes available.

WASTECON Highlights

 

Tuesday, January 26, 2021, at 4:00 PM – 4:45 PM (EST)
wastecon 2021Keynote: Outside the Box: Reinventing Your Organization in Response to COVID-19 features a diverse panel that will share some innovative ways their organizations have responded and reinvented themselves to remain relevant during the pandemic. Three speakers provide perspective including, Carlton Williams – City of Philadelphia; James Walsh – SCS Engineers; John Brusa, Jr. – Barton & Loguidice.

 

Thursday, January 28, at 3:00 PM – 3:45 PM (EST)
Keynote: Paying for Waste Services During the Downturn features a panel that will present options for financing solid waste operations during the economic downturn and ways to plan for the future. Economist Vita Quinn – SCS Engineers; John Chalmers – Baltimore City Department of Public Works; Kim Braun – Culver City, CA

 

Anytime! On-Demand Resourcesat your convenience, these short, non-commercial sessions are available in the SCS Learning Center. Click the title to begin playing.

Budget and Operational Strategies for Municipalities

A solid waste expert, an economist, and a city council member discuss municipal funding resources and strategies. Each brings their perspective and experience to inform and answer questions from a live audience including, the big picture approach, expense-based solutions, revenue diversification and optimization strategies, financial modeling of solid waste services.

Solid Waste Strategic Planning for Financial Security

This discussion, moderated by Bob Gardner, provides useful strategies when developing a business case analysis for SMM, recycling, or composting programs. The process also helps identify opportunities to increase efficiency, reduce operating costs, design a Capital Plan, and secure support for rate increases. Michelle Leonard assesses the pandemic’s effect on recycling programs, state regulatory policy, and funding challenges. Vita Quinn presents a financial modeling scenario employing financial modeling and solid waste facility software to help decision-makers visualize the impact of various alternatives on the planning process. The model is useful for budgeting and testing alternative scenarios for future waste policies, strategies, and funding.

 

Low Carbon Fuels Program SWANA Ohio 2020

Cassandra Drotman discusses the California Low Carbon Fuel Standard and market opportunities. She covers how the program works, what counts in California, and how other states are using California as a market in addition to their regional markets. She’s not just talking about green fuel; Cassandra examines the increasing range of low-carbon and renewable alternatives that are helping to drive transportation sector fuel pools to cleaner, reliable, and economically viable options.

Built to Last – Design, Build, and Operate Landfills for Extreme Weather Resiliency

Each U.S. region faces unique weather and climate events. Solid waste facilities and landfills are particularly vulnerable to extreme weather since they are exposed 24/7 to the environment. Extreme weather can disrupt safe and cost-effective operations, increase maintenance needs, and may compromise landfill stability. Increase your facility’s longevity and ability to survive extreme weather. The recording includes Q&A from solid waste professionals and features Robert Gardner and Bob Isenberg, who bring decades of expertise to the table, including landfill design and solid waste master planning. They provide strategies and resources based on successful solutions that help support your facility as you prepare for and likely will experience severe weather disruptions.

 

Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

More so than ever before, the solid waste industry faces complex and challenging odor issues based upon public, regulatory, and legal actions. Since odors are generally enforced through nuisance regulations, compliance can be difficult to achieve, not to mention almost impossible to define. Enforcement of odor nuisances is subjective, usually at the discretion of an environmental inspector or Air Pollution Control Officer, and often based upon citizen complaints. When citizen complaints mount and enforcement action is leveraged, lawsuits often surface as an added ongoing challenge to waste facility operations. This free webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess the potential for odor issues and, by doing so, set realistic benchmarks toward cost-effective and meaningful mitigation measures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am