waste management

2021 Iowa Recycling and Solid Waste Management Conference

October 4, 2021

The Iowa Recycling and Solid Waste Management Conference will host an in-person conference October 4-6, 2021, at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Cedar Rapids Convention Complex.   A slate of diverse speakers, a large exhibit hall, and some fun networking opportunities are on tap for this event including SCS’s own women in waste management.

 

SMM – Vision for Iowa Project Update
(Tuesday, October 5, 2021, 8:00 AM)

Michelle Leonard’s first presentation will provide an update on the Sustainable Materials Management Vision for the Iowa Phase II project, including work completed to date, and the plans and process for the project over the next 18 months.

 

Michelle LeonardFood Recycling and Rescue in LA County
(Tuesday, October 5, 2021, 9:50 AM)

Michelle Leonard’s second presentation will provide attendees with detailed information on food donation and recycling. Details include how the programs were envisioned, the planning process undertaken by the County, the program results, and the County’s next steps. She will present details on the County’s, private business, and haulers’ roles and responsibilities, and will offer suggestions for how other communities can implement a successful food donation program.

 

anastasia welchStrategically Planning an Alternative Cover
(Tuesday, October 5, 2021, 4:15 PM)

Anastasia Welch presents how alternative covers come in many varieties and may be appropriate for an individual site based on a number of design criteria, performance standards, and material availability considerations. Apart from technical engineering issues, long-term financial and maintenance requirements are also considered. And most importantly, how does termination of post-closure care work with an alternative cover?

Anastasia’s presentation will bring current a summary of evapotranspiration and synthetic turf cover systems and the main permitting and design considerations of each. The second portion of her presentation will explore how the financial assurance, post-closure care, and post-closure termination aspects of landfill management are impacted by these two alternative cover systems.

 

Click for details, safety information, and registration information

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:00 am

What’s in your landfill? What it’s costing you may not be sustainable.

September 27, 2021

Waste characterization studies help businesses, government planners, haulers, and recyclers understand what’s in their waste streams, a first step in devising ways to reduce waste and cut disposal costs.

 

Recently the state of Wisconsin released its updated 2020-2021 statewide waste characterization study. The study found that the broad organics category, including yard waste and diapers, accounted for about 1.3 million tons. An estimated 924,900 tons of paper, including cardboard, compostable and office paper, comprised about 21 percent of the landfills’ tonnage. That was followed by plastic at about 17 percent or 745,600 tons.

You can read the study, but why do local governments, states, and waste management businesses request these studies? Because waste and landfills are expensive to manage. Diverting waste from landfills cuts greenhouse gases and supplies materials for reuse as new products or compost – a more sustainable system.

Waste characterization information is designed for solid waste planning; however, anyone interested in the characteristics of the solid waste stream may find it useful. Studies can also target specific waste or needs such as construction and demolition waste and business waste generators. A generator means a person, specific location, or business that creates waste.

These studies help start answering questions such as:

  • How much wasted food could be diverted for consumption or organics management?
  • How is COVID impacting recycling and recycled material feedstocks?
  • Which business groups dispose or recycle the most tons, and what materials make up those tons?
  • What is the commercial sector’s overall waste composition for disposal and diversion streams?
  • What are the detailed compositions for different groups or generators?
  • How much building debris is mixed in, and what kind of impact does it have?

States, jurisdictions, citizens, and businesses can use this information as a planning tool to help meet state mandates and their goals to reduce waste and achieve the benefits of sustainable practices. Kudos to Wisconsin, Iowa, and California, several of the many states moving toward more circular waste management!

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SCS Engineers Founder Tom Conrad Honored by SWANA with the Robert L. Lawrence Award

August 13, 2021

Leading environmental engineers, consultants, and contracting firm in the U.S.
Tom Conrad, Bob Stearns, and Curt Schmidt were the founders of SCS Engineers in 1970.

 

The International Awards Committee and Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) Board of Directors unanimously voted to honor Tom Conrad, the “C” in SCS, with the Robert L. Lawrence Distinguished Service Award at WASTECON 2021 in November. The Lawrence award is the highest accolade SWANA bestows on a member of the waste management industry, reserved for those making meaningful and lasting contributions.

“I’m honored and humbled to be selected for the Robert L. Lawrence Award. I thank you and am especially thankful for what SWANA and SCS are today,” stated Tom Conrad.

SWANA recognizes Conrad for over 60 years of significant influence on the waste management and environmental services industry. Conrad, a Founder, Executive Vice President, and Director Emeritus of SCS Engineers, dedicated his career to advancing solid waste management, most notably through the founding of SCS Engineers (Stearns, Conrad, and Schmidt Consulting Engineers) more than 51 years ago.

Tom Conrad worked on a wide range of environmental engineering projects touching almost every aspect of solid waste management throughout his career.  As an environmental engineering firm and consultant to the newly created US Environment Protection Agency (EPA), the founders recognized that responsible solid waste management was increasingly important for protecting the environment and the health and safety of the general public.

Leading SCS, he helped the EPA develop the first federal regulations for sanitary landfills, managing and capturing landfill gas, waste sorting protocols, sludge management, and land remediation.

Environmental services, including wastewater management, were always a significant part of SCS services and the waste industry. When new regulatory policies began expanding in the ’80s, SCS’s techniques, technology, and expertise helped a broad range of industries comply with environmental needs and continues today with the firm’s greenhouse gas, landfill technology, renewable energy, remediation, and sustainable materials management programs.

Conrad is also known for hiring and mentoring today’s SCS leaders, many of whom are SWANA leaders, by creating and fostering SCS’s culture encouraging employee participation in industry associations, community, and SCS’s mentorship and leadership programs.

 

Leading environmental engineers, consultants, and contracting firm in the U.S.
SCS’s current executive leadership and SWANA members, Bob Gardner (Solid Waste), Jim Walsh (CEO), with Tom Conrad, and Mike McLaughlin (Environmental Services).

 

Before his retirement in 2016, Conrad held professional engineering licenses in 24 states. He was a member of SWANA, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the National Waste and Recycling Association, and the Society of American Military Engineers.

He maintains his “work hard – play hard” lifestyle. He is active at SCS, participating in Board of Director meetings and speaking at the Young Professionals Group events and celebrations. While no longer mountain climbing and biking cross-country, he has a vigorous walking, swimming, and biking schedule.

 

An icon at SCS Engineers and at home, Tom is not slowing down – he has more playtime now!

 

Congratulations, Tom!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Stephens Works to Take GIS to Next Levels for Landfill Data Collection and Analyses

July 12, 2021

Joy Stephens and Mel Russo using a drone to gather and a laptop to collect and see landfill readings.

 

In her first job at SCS Engineers, Joy Stephens worked in a small trailer, consolidating and analyzing data from landfill field techs’ notes, recorded in logbooks they lugged around while navigating the challenging site terrain, then brought to her covered in leachate and mud.

Transcribing can be messy.

She cross-referenced their detailed, handwritten records with a master list posted on a wall, organized, and methodically examined them. Then she turned them into actionable intel for SCS’s engineers and scientists.

“That was definitely easier said than done. It was a lot of work – a lot of hours to make sure that we were ready for the next day. It struck me that there’s got to be a better way. That we could make collecting and using this valuable information easier for the field staff and OM&M (Operations, Monitoring & Maintenance),” she says.

 

GIS Supports Wellfield Operations

From that inspiration came a lot of brainstorming, developing, and tweaking what today is a powerful yet user-friendly GIS system that stores and organizes volumes of geographical information in one place and gives users what they need fast to troubleshoot landfill conditions. The customizable application is now used at hundreds of landfills across the country, mainly to support wellfield operations, though it has other landfill system applications.

Wellfield liquid levels and detail at a glance.

 

Field techs enter information onto digital forms using a mobile app and submit the data, uploading it to the cloud. OM&M teams have it in a streamlined format in a couple of minutes and can visualize what they are looking for on maps from a dashboard.

The technology that Stephens was an integral player in launching continues to evolve, and there’s a story behind that evolution.

“In the beginning, I reached out to this brilliant young lady, Brooke Aumann, from the Tampa office, who does a lot of GIS work. I had some GIS experience myself, but more landfill knowledge. I picked her brain so we could set up a digital replacement for the logbooks that zeroed in on exactly what the field techs and project managers needed to support our clients,” says Stephens, an environmental scientist.

Together, the two women created experimental web maps to plot and visualize basic information such as the location of each monitoring point, points requiring the collection of liquid levels, and the status of maintenance tasks at each well. Then they developed digital survey forms with more detailed information and connected those forms to the maps; this enabled end-users to overlay even more data for a holistic snapshot of what goes on at wellfields.

“We tried different configurations of web maps and symbology to depict best what we wanted to convey. We talked about what we needed to symbolize and how we needed to symbolize it. And we discussed possibilities for future developments. We knew much more was possible in terms of what we could collect, how all of these data are connected, and how we could exploit the software to better tackle more complex tasks,” Stephens says.

 

From maps to interfacing data forms to the next level X-ray vision

“Now we’ve gone a step further. We’re doing 3D well visualizations, which give a kind of Superman X-ray vision subsurface. You are literally looking beneath to the well to get good intel,” Stephens says.

Wellfield visualization allows you to see the subsurface field and well conditions, including pumps.

 

Traversing the World

With undergraduate degrees in Mandarin Chinese and geology and graduate degrees in teaching science and environmental management, Stephens has long loved learning, the environment, and nature.

“When I was young, my parents were missionaries, and I grew up in the most beautiful, pristine, remote areas, like the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu – so unspoiled and lovely.”

It was a sharp contrast to what she would see later when she moved with her young son to China, where she taught math and science. The air quality was poor, and the streets and landscape were inundated with litter.

That experience was the final push that landed the young professional at the foot of a career path she’d considered for some time; environmental sciences. She’d taught it before, but a voice inside her was telling her to pivot and actually start doing the work.

Stephens found her way into a program at a university in Scotland after researching graduate environmental management programs worldwide. At this prestigious learning institution, she first worked with remote sensors and GIS, identifying and addressing “waste crimes,” namely illegal dumping.

 

Seizing the opportunity to apply her expertise

After graduation, the teacher-turned-scientist took her education and experience back to the United States and SCS Engineers. The company was not foreign to her. By the time she applied, she had made as much a project of vetting employers as she had of scoping out universities. Two draws drew her attention:

“There is the ethos; SCS is genuinely committed to the environment. And the other part that was important to me is SCS is very invested in professional growth and training to foster that growth. I believed that I would have opportunities to move up,” Stephens reflects, recalling when she said yes to the first job working with those logbooks that would be the catalyst to what was to come.

When she came on board, she had to gain practical experience in the solid waste industry and learn the ropes in the field, in addition to her prior experience in renewable energy.  In time she had learned her way around landfill gas collection wells, then kept building on that knowledge.

“I asked a ton of questions. Why are we monitoring for this? What constitutes good gas quality? Why is it important to know liquid levels? What is the difference between vacuum and flow? I think asking all these questions, collecting field data myself, and watching what the guys in the field had to do, gave me a good base understanding to help inform how we would capture the right information using GIS. It was a collaborative effort. Brooke worked on many landfill projects and my colleague, Chris Carver, had 16 years of field and project management work. It all came together.”

She later joined the RMC team (Remote Monitoring and Controls), where she received further training in GIS and mastered other skill sets. Today she is a project professional specializing in GIS and drone services.

 

At home with waste management

The hybrid techie-artist in Stephens comes out when she makes an analogy that tells a little of how her wheels turn.

She grew up playing Legos and now, at almost 40 years old, still builds with them at home with her son.

She approaches the job the same way as when she assembles those sets.

“You know the pieces fit to make something, but it takes creativity to figure out just how to build it and make it as visually pleasing and functional as you can, or to get it to function in different ways. I try to configure and piece together for the best possible design,” she says.

Stephens has married that approach with a desire to be a part of both restoring and protecting the environment. She thinks she’s in the right place to act on that intention.

“I feel like work with waste management and SCS is a way to achieve what I think is so important. We are trying to protect, remediate, and leave conditions better than we found them. That is what being a good steward is all about.”

See Joy Stephens at work in her recent educational presentation for landfill owners and operators. Joy demonstrates technologies to reduce the time to collect, process, and show data.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 10:24 am

Inductive Automation Podcast: Improving Sustainability in Waste Management

July 8, 2021

 

David Hostetter from SCS Engineers® and Dennis Siegel from Waste Management® are the feature speakers on Inductive Conversations, a podcast about the unique processes and challenges within the waste management industry, from residential to the engineering and life cycles of landfills.

Dave and Dennis discuss how operational improvements are being made in this essential service and its environmental footprint. They dive into the 24/7 maintenance and monitoring of landfills, adjusting to changing conditions in real-time, reducing cost, generating renewable energy, improving the health and safety of operators, and being proactive in a changing world. We also hear about an Ignition-based solution called Connected Landfills that improves connectivity, mobility, and visualization by using data science to facilitate better decisions.

Apple Podcasts  |  Spotify  |  Google Play  |  PodBean  |  TuneIn

 

See more technology in our recent video – landfills are now able to see subsurface well conditions. It’s better than x-ray vision!

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Ryan Duckett, President of the Virginia Chapter of the US Composting Council

April 30, 2021

 

The Virginia Composting Council is the state affiliate of the US Composting Council; its mission is to support the efforts and initiatives of the USCC and bring the practice of composting to more Virginians. The Composting Council is growing because of increased efforts by communities to divert food waste from disposal. Demand is growing with increased awareness of composting’s beneficial uses.

The Virginia Council, led by President Ryan Duckett of SCS Engineers, cites the obvious benefits of less waste going to landfills and lower greenhouse gas emissions in the environment. He also points out the jobs and business development potential and using compost for stormwater management, erosion control, and other green infrastructure as benefits. Expanded programs also offer the opportunity to collect edible foods for non-profits feeding many in need while diverting non-edible organics to composting.

The Council brings together manufacturers, municipal managers, organics collectors, researchers, and other compost allies in the waste industry. The group works to educate state regulators, local officials, and the public about composting’s value in a circular system. Members also help develop positions on regulations and legislation that affect composting and the market.

USCC has 13 state chapters that do local work to advance the composting industry alongside the national advocacy and programs. Without their on-the-ground education, attention to and work in regulations and legislation, and building networks of people in the industry, USCC could not be effective.

Learn more about composting.

 

Our congratulations to Ryan and the entire USCC for the help and support they bring to our communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

45th Annual A&WMA Information Exchange Virtual Conference

December 8, 2020

Please join the Air & Waste Management Association for their annual Information Exchange (virtual conference), December 8-10, 2020.

The conference will feature information exchange, discussion, and solutions from and among industry and regulatory leading experts. This year’s virtual program will cover policy updates, regulatory changes, and research on the latest environmental topics.

U.S. EPA speakers from the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) and Office of Research and Development (ORD) will present their latest information on environmental rules, policies, and research on current topics, including:

  • Power Sector Rules – Nick Hutson, EPA/OAQPS
  • Major MACT to Area (MM2A) Reclassifications – Rod Truesdell, EPA/OAQPS
  • RTR Program – Brian Shrager, EPA/OAQPS
  • NSPS Program Overview – Jodi Howard, EPA/OAQPS
  • NAAQS – Pat Dolwick, EPA/OAQPS
  • Summary of EPA’s Current Work with Air Sensors & Satellites – Kristen Benedict and Barron Henderson, EPA/OAQPS
  • New Source Review – Tanya Abrahamian, EPA/OAQPS
  • National Emissions Inventory – Rich Mason, EPA/OAQPS
  • COVID-19 Impact on Air Quality – Liz Naess, EPA/OAQPS
  • PFAS Method Development – Jeff Ryan, EPA/ORD
  • PFAS Modeling – Ben Murphy, EPA/ORD
  • PFAS Incineration – Bill Linak, EPA/ORD
  • Sensor Advancement – Andrea Clements, EPA/ORD
  • Wildfire Smoke Stakeholder Engagement – Amara Holder, EPA/ORD

Additional speakers from industry, NGOs, agencies and academia will share their expertise and the latest solutions for maintaining compliance and reducing environmental impacts, including:

  • North Carolina Division of Air Quality Program Update – Michael Abraczinskas, North Carolina Division of Air Quality
  • Framework for Measurement and Modeling of Multi-pollutant Exposure Assessment – Chris Frey, North Carolina State University

Two panels are also in development on the topics of PFAS and Global Climate Change.

Click for registration and conference details

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am

USGBC Panel on Landfills, Technology, and the Future

December 3, 2020

SCS Professionals Ali Khatami and David Hostetter, along with sustainability expert Leslie Lukacs will discuss “Landfills, Technology, and the Future” at a panel hosted by the US Green Building Council on December 3 (1:00 PM Eastern).

  • Dr. Khatami (Project Director and Vice President of SCS Engineers) will discuss the history of landfills and waste management, including engineering improvements to safety and environmental risk reduction;
  • Mr. Hostetter (Remote Monitoring and Controls Regional Manager of SCS Engineers) will talk about new landfill technologies, including using landfill gas to create energy from waste; and
  • Ms. Lukacs (Executive Director, Zero Waste Sonoma) will address sustainable materials management and the drive to Zero Waste, using Sonoma as a case study.
  • Jessica Wright, LEED Green Associate, TRUE Advisor, Senior Project Manager, ecoPreserve (Moderator)

Landfills are a part of what keeps our society moving. While they have their drawbacks, advances in landfill design and technology use in landfills are improving their operation and management. This panel will address what we see coming in the future to help our society manage our waste.

Event registration: https://101520landfills.eventbrite.com
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/643323933211008
LinkedIn event: https://www.linkedin.com/events/6718943429298003968/

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 1:00 pm

Waste Management wins technology award for innovative environmental platform

September 15, 2020

Learn more about Waste Management’s Award at minute 30:54 of the video conference recording. Congratulations to the Waste Management Team!

The Ignition Firebrand Awards recognize system integrators such as SCS Engineers and industrial firms for their use of technology to create innovative solutions.

Today at the virtual Ignition Community Conference, Waste Management (WM) is accepting the 2020 Firebrand Award for its landfill technology and automation platform advances. The Company designed an internal solution then contracted with SCS Engineers’ RMC Practice, and Vertech Industrial Solutions to deploy WM’s new innovative ‘Connected Landfills’ pilot.

“Waste Management is excited to be recognized for our innovative work and use of new technologies,” said Bryan Tindell, vice president of disposal operations at Waste Management. “Striving for the most innovative and advanced technology in the world of waste helps ensure we are able to continue providing essential services for residents, customers and our communities. The use of advanced technology has also introduced new ways of working for our employees, further elevating their daily experience and streamlining our processes.”

WM’s Connected Landfills system was first piloted at the West Edmonton Landfill in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The pilot proved to simplify workflows, equipping landfill assets with internet-connected devices and sensors. Technicians are able to review data remotely via dashboards on mobile devices, allowing them to monitor changes, make decisions and even directly interact with equipment with the push of a button. With less time spent in transit, landfill employees will be able to spend more time managing landfills’ productivity and health.

“The integration of remote monitoring and control helps make landfill operations more efficient, sustainable, and creates a safer environment for landfill staff and the surrounding community,” said Dave Hostetter, regional manager of SCS RMC®. “That the innovation is being recognized as well is gratifying.”

This design and integration advances WM’s existing environmental management platform by increasing worker safety, the user experience, and running the landfill systems efficiently. It also supports Waste Management’s commitment to ensuring public safety and environmental protection for landfill staff and the surrounding community. Landfills, and the municipalities and companies that operate landfills use sophisticated technology to manage the complex environmental systems that keep citizens and the air, water, and soil surrounding landfills healthy. Ongoing collection of data from these assets, often collected by checking meters positioned throughout landfill sites, is essential for landfills’ safe operation.

Waste Management operates the largest network of landfills in the industry, managing the disposal of almost 100 million tons of waste every year at over 250 sites across Canada and the US. Based on the pilot’s success, WM plans to expand the Connected Landfills system to other sites throughout North America.

About Waste Management
Waste Management, based in Houston, Texas, is the leading provider of comprehensive waste management environmental services in North America. Through its subsidiaries, the Company provides collection, transfer, disposal services, and recycling and resource recovery. It is also a leading developer, operator and owner of landfill gas-to-energy facilities in the United States. The Company’s customers include residential, commercial, industrial, and municipal customers throughout North America. To learn more information about Waste Management, www.wm.com.

About SCS Engineers
SCS Engineers’ environmental solutions and technology are a direct result of our experience and dedication to |solid waste management and other industries responsible for safeguarding the environment while delivering products and services. For more information about SCS, please visit our website at scsengineers.com or watch our 50th Anniversary video.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 1:58 pm

2020 A&WMA Virtual Conference Begins June 30, 2020

June 30, 2020

Air & Waste Management Association’s 113th Annual Conference  – “ACE 2020 Gateway to Innovation”, has been transformed into a virtual conference that will begin on June 30.

A&WMA’s ACE 2020 Virtual Conference will allow you to stay up to date on timely and critical topics – all within an online environment that can be accessed from anywhere. The same great information and knowledge in their technical program will be available, with enhanced online features that will allow you to connect with presenters, attendees, exhibitors and sponsors.

The ACE 2020 Virtual Conference runs Tuesday, June 30 through Thursday, July 2 with an engaging lineup of scheduled live-streamed sessions each day and hundreds of on-demand presentations that will be available through June 2021.

The Virtual conference will include dozens of livestream events and presentations and numerous on-demand sessions, including the following by SCS professionals:

  • 809664 – Uncertainty EPA has Created with New NSPS XXX and Cf Rules, with Pat Sullivan Gabrielle Stephens, and Cassie Drotman
  • 796213 – An Overview and Next Steps for California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard, with Ray Huff, Cassie Drotman, and Haley DeLong
  • 799398 – Assessment of Factors that affect Hydrogen Sulfide Corrosion of Manhole Shafts, including Dr. Gomathy Iyer
  • 807200 – Air Permitting Challenges for the Commodity Fumigation Industry, featuring Jeff Marshall and Ryan Christman

Click for more information and to register

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am