Tag Archives: waste to energy

WasteExpo 2020, New Orleans

August 10, 2020

WASTE EXPO 2020 HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO AUGUST 10-13, 2020. IT WILL STILL BE HELD AT THE ERNEST N. MORIAL CONVENTION CENTER IN NEW ORLEANS.  Due to the scheduling change, the rooms, dates, times, and other details below are subject to change. We will update them as information becomes available. Information about Waste Expo’s decision to reschedule and its implications can be found here: https://www.wasteexpo.com/en/venue-travel/HealthandWellness.html

Meet SCS Professionals, visit our booth (Booth 3101), get inspired, and find the answers to your waste & recycling challenges at WasteExpo, August 10-13 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans.

Enjoy an interactive conference program, see over 600 exhibitors, and network with 14, 500 of the best and brightest in the industry. SCS professionals Michelle Leonard, Tracie Bills, Lisa Coelho, Amber Duran, Viraj deSilva, and Michelle Hoffman will be in attendance and SCS Senior Vice President Pat Sullivan at booth 3101.

WasteExpo 2020 will feature more educational sessions than ever before!  Conference sessions include SCS presentations such as these:

PFAS Super Session: What is PFAS & How Do We Treat It?
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been produced in the U.S. since the 1940s and are used in a wide variety of products and applications. PFAS are persistent in the environment and resistant to environmental degradation. The potential bioaccumulation of PFAS is a concern, and EPA considers PFAS to be emerging contaminants.

This super-session, chaired by Dr. Viraj deSilva of SCS Engineers will address all things PFAS, and is split into two parts:

  • Part I – Laying the Foundation: Laying the Foundation: Part I will set the stage for PFAS, discuss background information, historical legal challenges, and sampling and analytical challenges and opportunities.
  • Part II- Treatment Options : Treatment Options: Part II will focus specifically on treatment options – including underground injection, destruction, and separation.

Organics Diversion and Collection
Moderator: Tracie Onstad Bills, SCS Engineers , will moderate this discussion on the Importance of Organic Waste Diversion; whether Commercial Organics Diversion Mandates are Working in California; and Making Cents of SB 1383: CA’s 75% Organic Diversion Mandate.


Evaluation of Organics Management Options; Composting Odor Control; Equipment Maintenance
Moderator: George Savage, CalRecovery, Patrick Sullivan and Raymond Huff of SCS Engineers with a Comparison of Organic Waste Management Options in Terms of Air Quality and GHG Impacts. This session also covers how to eliminate compost facility odors and maintenance strategies.


The Effects of Organic Diversion Policies on Food Donation
Moderator: Hannah Cather, Food Recovery Network with Tracie Onstad Bills of SCS Engineers presenting on the RecycleSmart Edible Food Generator Survey for the Contra Costa County Solid Waste Authority. Also covered will be Leveraging Organic Waste Mandates, Public-Private Partnerships Support Wasted Food Diversion Efforts, and Vallarta Supermarkets Recycling, Organics, and Food Waste Donations.


Reducing Food Waste and Increasing Recovery in Municipal, Regional, and State Programs
Spotlight Session – Open to All WasteExpo Attendees
Moderator: Evan Edgar and speaker Lisa Coelho of SCS Engineers discuss the Santa Clara County Community Based Social Marketing (CBSM) of Food Waste Reduction Program and Food Recovery Efforts. Also included are presentations on Los Angeles County’s Three-Pronged Approach by Michelle Leonard of SCS Engineers, Accelerate Food Waste Reduction Through Collaboration, Eating the Food Scraps Elephant: How Madison, WI is Tackling the Problem of Food Scraps a Bite at a Time through Prevention and Diversion, with John Welch, Director Waste & Renewables, Dane County.


Panel Discussion on the Future of Organics in California
Learn about California’s SB 1383 implementation that will require 75% diversion of organic waste from landfills by 2025. Hear from industry policy leaders and composters in an interactive panel discussion regarding collection, contamination, permitting, and markets of transforming organic wastes into compost and energy products.

This lively discussion will include questions from the audience on how to develop over 100 facilities at a cost of $2 to $3 billion. Moderator Evan Edgar with Tracie Onstad Bills of SCS Engineers and Bill Camarillo.


EREF’s Annual Charitable Auction & Silent Auction

In addition to the technical sessions, The Environmental Research & Education Foundation (EREF) will host its annual charitable auction at WasteExpo 2020. The auction supports EREF’s funding of scholarships and grants for solid waste research, as well as EREF’s educational initiatives. Since 1994, the auction has raised more than $18 million. While on the show floor, look for large red balloons indicating those exhibitors who donated to the EREF Auction.

Silent Auction: Tuesday, August 11, 10:00 am – Wednesday, August 12, 4:00 pm

Live Auction: Wednesday, August 12, 2020. Reception begins at 3:00 pm; bidding begins at 3:30 pm


Click here to visit the WasteExpo 2020 website for more details and registration information.

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am
Tag Archives: waste to energy

How Does a Community get to Zero Waste in the 21st Century?

April 21, 2016

Zero Waste does not mean “zero trash”, but rather a “Zero Waste” of resources.

 

By Michelle Leonard, Solid Waste Planning and Recycling; Sustainability
National Expert

The term describes the desired end-state and a call-to-action rethinking what we regard as trash as potentially valuable resources. The overall goal of zero waste planning is to establish the goal of diverting at least 90 percent of the waste generated by all sources from a landfill.
Zero Waste is to:

  • Reduce our excess consumption.
  • Minimize any unnecessary waste.
  • Encourage recycling to the maximum extent possible.
  • Ensure that the products we use are made to be reused, repaired, or recycled back into nature or back into the marketplace.

Communities across North America have embraced the concept of Zero Waste, some by adopting a Zero Waste goal or policy, and others by completing a Zero Waste Plan. The plan includes implementing zero waste programs and infrastructure in a manner most sustainable for the community. Many communities establish a long-term goal of Zero Waste by setting interim goals to achieve and benchmark measuring progress. Goals may be quantified over years, by percentages, or by environmental factors relevant to your community.

There are several factors critical to sustainable Zero Waste programs.

Phasing in programs encourages acceptance of new policies, programs, and facilities, and the behavior modifications that come with them. Instead of continuing to focus on results at the end of the process, we find ways to fulfill the equation “waste = resource” within our industrial and societal systems. This mindset change helps to lead us to more systems that eliminate wastes to the environment, avoiding systematic deterioration of the environment. These systems are modeled by nature as the most efficient, less costly, and most profitable ways to move toward Zero Waste.

Programs that contribute to Zero Waste include upstream policies and programs. Over 71% of the waste generated happens before products and materials enter our homes, offices, schools and institutions. Upstream policies and programs aim to reduce the volume and toxicity of discarded products and materials and promote low-impact or reduced consumption lifestyles.

Producer Responsibility is an upstream activity, including advocacy at the state level and implementation of local ordinances for hard to handle materials, such as pharmaceuticals, sharps, batteries, CFLs. Local jurisdictions can support state legislation for Extended Producer Responsibility for materials such as carpet paint, etc.
Downstream programs aim to ensure the highest and best use of products and packaging at the end of their useful lives. They establish a hierarchy of:

  • Reusing products and packaging, retaining their original form and function.
  • Recycling materials that are not reduced or reused.
  • Composting materials that are not recycled.

Managing these materials will most likely require a combination of facilities which may include:

  • Material Recovery Facilities
  • Composting Facilities
  • Resource Recovery Parks
  • Construction & Demolition Debris Processing Facilities
  • Alternatives Technologies

The issue of how Waste to Energy fits into a Zero Waste system has been a hotly debated topic at many Zero Waste conferences, workshops, and planning sessions. The Zero Waste International Alliance includes in its definition “no burning or burying”. However, even the most aggressive, advanced Zero Waste system will still have some residual materials, and these materials will need to be managed. Some cities that have adopted Zero Waste plans and/or policies include waste to energy in their strategic plans. These cities recognize that Zero Waste policies and programs will achieve a high diversion rate, but they also acknowledge that a portion of the waste stream residuals will need to be disposed or processed. For these cities, waste to energy, or another alternative technology facility will fill that need, and will further reduce the use of landfill disposal.

Contact Michelle Leonard

Learn more about Sustainable Materials Management

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: waste to energy

DDC Journal – Winter Edition – Waste to Energy

November 9, 2015

DDC Journal recently published an interesting article by Pat Sullivan, “Developing power plants that reduce environmental impacts.” http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/097d62a6#/097d62a6/24

 

Pat Sullivan, BCES, CPP, REPA, is a Senior Vice President of SCS Engineers and our National Expert on the Landfill Clean Air Act and the New Source Performance Standard (NSPS). Mr. Sullivan has over 25 years of environmental engineering experience, specializing in solid and hazardous waste-related issues.

Posted by Diane Samuels at 7:22 pm
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