clean air

Clients, Colleagues and AWMA Honor Stephanie Taylor as a 2021 Outstanding Young Professional

February 18, 2021

Stephanie presenting at a technology conference in 2019.

 

Stephanie Taylor’s outstanding work recently earned her the prestigious Air & Waste Management Association’s 2021 Young Professional Award. As an SCS Engineers Environmental Professional, Stephanie manages and supports numerous clients in the Midwest, providing valuable air compliance/permitting and groundwater compliance services. She is a respected colleague at SCS and frequently provides services to offices outside of her business unit as an air compliance/permitting specialist.

In her recent work, Stephanie provided air compliance/permit audit services to a private client completing a companywide multimedia audit. Her work took her to multiple industrial manufacturing plants nationwide. Her attention to detail is integral in identifying non-compliance and areas of improvement that her client implemented company-wide to improve operations and compliance with permit requirements.

Stephanie joined with Midwest AWMA board in 2016 and quickly accepted the challenges of leadership, becoming Vice Chair in 2018 and as Chair for the Midwest Section in 2019 and 2020. In both positions, she was responsible for managing/coordinating the annual Midwest AWMA conference, a big job. She continues to serve the Midwest AWMA Chapter in a leadership role.

Stephanie has been the lead for the Young Professionals (YP) group in the SCS Kansas City office for several years. Her responsibilities include coordinating YP networking events and coordinating with the corporate YP group to support and mentor new YPs entering the workforce.

Tia Jeter, Stephanie’s manager says,
I have full confidence in Stephanie and her abilities and do not hesitate to let her take the lead on projects as I know the work quality she produces. She is a dedicated and key member of our SCS team. She is technically very strong and dependable, and co-workers know she will get the job done and stay on top of the client’s needs. She has done a great job getting involved with both SCS groups, the YP association, and the AWMA board.

 

Congratulations, Stephanie. Thank you for your dedication to your clients, industry, colleagues, and profession.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Visible Emissions – What You Need to Know

October 15, 2018

Ann O’Brien helps industrial and agricultural companies stay abreast of the regulatory information necessary to remain compliant with federal and state policies. Ann’s most recent series of articles for businesses in the printing or agricultural industries provides advice on air permits and the need for addressing the limits on visible emissions likely specified in their air permits.

Here’s what you need to know about what visible emissions are, how they’re regulated, and how to stay in compliance with your air permit. For other industries, please feel free to contact any SCS office or email us at service.scsengineers.com. We provide our professional services nationwide.

Printing Industry
Agricultural Industry

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SCS Advice from the Field: Tier 4 Surface Emissions Monitoring Process and Issues

July 10, 2018

This paper, presented at A&WMA’s 111th Annual Conference details the Tier 4 process and the potential issues that have arisen from conducting a Tier 4. This paper also assesses potential Tier 4 sites, exceedance reporting, wind monitoring, additional SEM equipment requirements, penetration monitoring, notification and reporting requirements, and impacts on solid waste landfills that will use the Tier 4 SEM procedure for delaying GCCS requirements. This paper reviews the changes between the draft NSPS and the final version of the new NSPS that was promulgated.

Click to read or share the paper, and learn about the authors.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:05 pm

Improving Global Air Quality – Perspective in the A&WMA Publication for Young Professionals

April 5, 2018

This article discusses global air quality and how the collaboration between policy-makers and the scientific community can have a continued positive impact on air quality in the U.S. This collaboration has been the primary cause for the improvements observed in air quality over the past few decades.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) programs, such as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), New Source Review, and Maximum Achievable Control Technology standards, have all had a significant impact on improving air quality by lowering the ambient concentrations of NOX, VOC, CO, SOX, and PM.

Some areas, such as southern California, have committed to working toward electrifying the transportation network, implementing more stringent standards on diesel fuel sulfur content, and encouraging heavier utilization of public transportation.

Read the full article here.

Author: SCS Engineers’ Ryan Christman, M.S., is an air quality engineer and environmental management  information systems specialist with experience in the oil and gas industry and the solid waste industry.  He is just one of SCS’s outstanding Young Professionals.

Posted by Diane Samuels at 8:57 am

SCS clients are preparing for NSPS and NMOC with resources, information and timelines – you can too

October 11, 2016

SCS is working to get our landfill clients through NMOC and NSPS with timelines – they are prepared for what they need to do now and in the future. Listed here are the most popular and timely resources and information useful for your own planning.

Article in Waste360: explains who’s impacted and how to begin managing the costs.

SCS Technical Bulletin: a digest of hundreds of EPA regulatory policy into the information and timelines to act on now.

Article: strategic financial planning to support infrastructure costs.

Call our compliance specialists – find the office nearest you or email us at  

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 11:27 am

L.A. Program Supports the County’s Roadmap to a Sustainable Waste Management Future

September 14, 2016

“This program directly supports the county’s Roadmap to a Sustainable Waste Management Future by helping businesses to implement recycling programs,” says Leonard. “And not only recycling but waste reduction, as well, all of which, of course, contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, resource management and sustainable materials management.”

Read the article about L.A. County’s Plan for Sustainable Waste Management

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

“Landfills are living, breathing beasts …

September 12, 2016

…and as waste settles, it can have an effect on equipment,” according to Pat Sullivan of SCS Engineers in this ClimateWire article. As the U.S. EPA focuses on pushing landfill owners into cutting down on methane emissions some worry that a combination of tightening regulations and poor cost analysis might put some smaller landfills out of business.

Read the full article here.

LANDFILL EMISSIONS: Going to the dump? You might make electricity
Kavya Balaraman, E&E reporter

Reprinted from ClimateWire with permission from E&E Publishing, LLC. Copyright 2016. 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

EPA Regulatory Alert: SCS Technical Bulletin – NSPS – EG Final Rule Published – August 2016

August 30, 2016

The EPA published NSPS – EG final rule in the federal register on August 29, 2016. This SCS Technical Bulletin compiles the 856 pages of NSPS and EG documents into 3 pages of the significant information you need to know. The rule takes effect 60 days after August 29, some requirements are linked to the publication date in the register.

 

Read the NSPS – EG Technical Bulletin

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 10:04 am

When Do Printing Facilities Need Federal Title V Operating Permits?

August 24, 2016

Article by Cheryl Moran, CHMM

Technological advances in traditional printing and the advent of digital printing can make it more challenging to know when you need an air permit and which permit is best for your operations.

There are two main activities that may trigger air permitting – construction and operation; each of these comes with its own permitting requirements.  Always check to see if you are required to apply for a construction permit before bringing new equipment on site.  Once a source is installed, an operating permit will be necessary, which is the focus of this article.

Federal Title V operating permits (also referred to as Part 70 permits) are required for any facility that is considered a “major source” of air pollution.  For purposes of operating permits only[1], a major source is a facility that has the potential to emit (PTE) more than 100 tons per year (tpy) of any criteria pollutant; volatile organic compounds (VOC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter less than 10 microns (PM10), or more than 10 tons of any individual hazardous air pollutant (HAP) or more than 25 tpy of combined HAPs .  Permitting thresholds are lower for facilities located in non-attainment areas.

Some facilities take limits on material throughputs, hours of operation, or emissions in order to artificially lower their PTE to qualify for a Federally Enforceable State Operating Permit (FESOP).  These permits are also called “synthetic minor” permits.

Facilities that do not exceed federal permitting thresholds may still need to acquire a state operating permit.  State permitting programs have more options than ever before and several states are summarized below.

ILLINOIS:
All “emission units” are required to secure an air permit, or register with the Illinois EPA, even very small sources of air pollution.  An “emission unit” is any piece of equipment located at an emission source that has a potential to emit air pollution.  Registration of Smaller Sources (ROSS) is for operations that emit less than 5 tpy of combined criteria pollutants.  Sources with a potential to emit more than 5 tpy, but whose emissions are less than the threshold for a FESOP, may qualify for a “life-time” operating permit.

Visit for more information on the Illinois EPA permitting program.

WISCONSIN: 
ROP Type A Registration Permit is for facilities with actual emissions of less than 25 tpy for criteria pollutants and 6.25 tons per year for HAPs.

ROP Type B Registration Permit is for facilities with actual emissions of less than 50 tpy for criteria pollutants and 12.5 tpy for HAPs.

ROP C Registration Permit for Printers is only available to printers.  To qualify for this permit, emissions of each criteria pollutant are limited to 25 tons per year, and HAPs are limited to 12.5 tons per year.

General Operation Permit (GOP) for Printers applies to digital, screen, lithographic web printing (both heatset and coldset), and lithographic sheetfed printing.

 

INDIANA: 
Source Specific Operating Agreement for Surface Coating or Graphic Arts Operations is available to printers with total VOC and HAPs that do not exceed 15 lb/day (7 lb/day in select counties).

Permit by Rule may be used for facilities that qualify for an operating agreement with criteria pollutant and HAP emissions that do not exceed 20% of the major source limits.

Find more on the Indiana permit options at http://www.in.gov/idem/airquality.

Whether you are applying for a state operating permit, or a federal operating permit, all applications will go through your state environmental regulatory agency.

[1] For construction permitting purposes, the thresholds that define a “major source” are typically higher than the operating permit thresholds.

 

For more information contact Cheryl Moran at SCS Engineers, Wisconsin or Ann O’Brien at SCS Engineers, Illinois, or  for an SCS professional in your state.

Cheryl Moran is a Project Manager with SCS Engineers with more than 20 years of experience in the printing industry. She is a Certified Hazardous Materials Manager (CHMM) and has worked with air, water, and waste issues including permitting, environmental recordkeeping, reporting and monitoring programs, hazardous waste management, environmental compliance audits, and sustainability programs.

Ann O’Brien is a Project Manager with SCS Engineers.  During her 32-year career in the printing industry she was responsible for environmental compliance programs, including, but not limited to, air and water quality permitting, environmental recordkeeping, reporting and monitoring programs, hazardous waste management, environmental compliance audits, and environmental site assessments and due diligence associated with real estate transactions and corporate acquisitions.  

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SCS Technical Bulletin Released: Inactive Surface Impoundments and EPA Direct Final Rules for Disposal of CCR from Electric Utilities

August 17, 2016

SCS periodically prepares technical bulletins to highlight items of interest to our clients and friends. These are published on our website. This SCS Technical Bulletin addresses:

Inactive Surface Impoundments and EPA Direct Final Rules for Disposal of Coal Combustion Residuals from Electric Utilities.

 

Read and share the SCS Technical Bulletin here.

SCS Coal Combustion Residual Services

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:22 pm