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September 1, 2021

SCSeTools - landfill and landfill gas technology

Landfill data collection and analysis are more tactical than ever, and landfill technology provides methods to manage and use the data to create efficiencies. With the implementation of the NESHAP, NSPS/EG requirements, Landfill Operators will monitor more often and maintain more records. Data collection mechanisms will likely broaden soon to include drone and satellite data collection as acceptable for agency requirements.

Our September 23, 2021, SCS’s Client Webinar focuses on landfill gas maintenance and how Operators find efficiencies by monitoring and collecting LFG data. Using SCS eTools, the webinar includes common scenarios at landfills and answers several questions, including:

  • How are landfill operators managing these millions of bits of data for operations, compliance reporting, and managing their landfill staff on single and multiple sites?
  • What features are most important to have in data monitoring and collection systems?
  • How does mobile technology increase efficiencies?

Demonstrations include:

  • Locating new LFG wells,
  • The cause of odors or surface emission monitoring hits by inspectors,
  • The cause of LFG migration to probes,
  • Identify obstructions in the header network,
  • Getting more gas for a power plant and preventing migration,
  • Identifying elevated temperature conditions,
  • Creating report libraries for regulatory compliance.

 

Register here for SCS’s Client Webinar: Using Data to Maximize Landfill Gas Efficiencies

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

January 21, 2021

This live session was recorded and posted for on-demand viewing in the SCS Learning Center 

 

Landfills, compost facilities, transfer stations, and renewable energy plants are cognizant of odor issues and strive to minimize odors. Proactive odor management is critical to the continued success and operation of these facilities.

More so than ever before, the solid waste industry faces complex and challenging odor issues based upon public, regulatory, and legal actions. Since odors are generally enforced through nuisance regulations, compliance can be difficult to achieve, not to mention almost impossible to define. Enforcement of odor nuisances is subjective, usually at the discretion of an environmental inspector or Air Pollution Control Officer, and often based upon citizen complaints. When citizen complaints mount, and enforcement action is leveraged, lawsuits often surface as an added ongoing challenge to waste facility operations. Now politicians are demanding action and using alleged odor violations as part of their environmental platforms. Facing odor issues can be costly and threaten the intended land-use designs that waste facilities require to serve their local communities.

If you missed the SCS Engineers’ January webinar, it’s not too late! To learn more about the proactive strategies and practices you can implement at your critical solid waste facilities. This free webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess the potential for odor issues and, by doing so, set realistic benchmarks toward cost-effective and meaningful mitigation measures.

Our panelists bring comprehensive expertise to the table, including facility design and planning, technical experience in air quality compliance and pollutant dispersion and air measurement programs, atmospheric dispersion and transport of airborne pollutants, particularly in the area of complex terrain. They will provide decades of strategies, resources, and best practices and technologies based on successful solutions that help support your facility as you prepare for, and likely will, experience odor complaints.

The team answers questions throughout the presentation, and the second portion of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 2:00 pm