landfills

Wisconsin Integrated Resource Management Conference Goes Virtual in February 2021

February 22, 2021

The Wisconsin Integrated Resource Management Conference (WIRMC) is the place to market your business to Wisconsin solid waste and recycling professionals.  WIRMC 2021 will take place as a virtual conference from February 22-25, 2021.  Several SCS professionals will be presenter, and SCS Engineers is a Gold Level sponsor of this important event.  Please stop by our Virtual booth!

Featured Hot Topics and Speakers include:

 

2020 Wisconsin Statewide Waste Characterization Study (Monday, Feb 22)
Speaker: Casey Lamensky, WDNR and Betsy Powers, SCS Engineers

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) has sponsored statewide waste sorts in 2002, 2009, and 2020. The 2020 study is being performed in October through December 2020 by SCS Engineers. This presentation will hit on the highlights of the project (participating facilities and methodology), share challenges and how they were addressed, and present some preliminary results and how the DNR hopes to use the information. We will discuss patterns that are standing out and lessons that can be shared.

School Sustainability Programs: Thriving in Changing Times – Panel (Tuesday, Feb 23)

Panelists include: Angeline Koch, Milwaukee Public Schools, Claire Oleksiak, Sustain Dane, Chris Jimieson, Madison Metropolitan School District, Janet Whited, Recycling Specialist, San Diego USD, moderator Debbi Dodson, Carton Council

Landfill Technology Innovations: YPs Improving Operations and Management (Tuesday, Feb 23)
Speakers: David Hostetter, Joy Stephens, Melissa Russo, and Sam Rice all of SCS Engineers

The technologies for operating and monitoring landfills are expanding and changing rapidly.  Hear from several SCS Young Professionals about the exciting developments currently underway.

Food Recycling and Rescue – A Major City’s Three-Pronged Approach (Wednesday, Feb 22)
Speaker: Michelle Leonard, Vice President, SCS Engineers

Los Angeles County’s unincorporated area is home to almost 1 million people, and each year its communities dispose of approximately 128,000 tons of food. At the same time, approximately 1 in 7 individuals are food insecure, lacking regular access to quality nutritious meals. In the last three years, Los Angeles County Public Works has launched a number of programs to reduce wasted food. These include in-house recycling, food scraps collection, and edible food recovery. These programs have saved millions of pounds of food from going to waste. We will provide attendees with detailed information on food recycling and donation. Details will include how the programs were envisioned, the planning process undertaken by the County, the program results, and the County’s next steps, and will provide suggestions for how other communities can implement a successful food recycling and donation program.

Changing Air Rules for Landfills (Thursday, Feb 25)
Speaker: Mark Hammers, SCS Engineers

On March 26, 2020, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) finalized amendments to the 2003 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. The NESHAP rules affect air permits and landfill gas system operating requirements for most active landfills. Some of the changes, like revised wellhead operational standards, may be welcomed by permittees. Other changes include additional monitoring requirements for wells operating at higher temperatures, and correction and clarification of Startup, Shutdown, and Malfunction (SSM) requirements. State agencies with air permitting authority are now incorporating the new NESHAP requirements into Title V permits. The interaction between the recently amended NESHAP rules and existing New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) rules (Subpart WWW and Subpart XXX) is creating some unique challenges. Learn about these unique challenges along with the history, applicability, timelines, and primary requirements of the revised NESHAP.

 

Click for more information and to register

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 12:00 pm

FREE Webinar: Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

January 18, 2021

landfill facility odor management

Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

FREE LIVE WEBINAR & Q/A

Landfills, compost facilities, transfer stations, and renewable energy plants are cognizant of odor issues and strive to minimize odors. Proactive odor management is critical to the continued success and operation of these facilities.

More so than ever before, the solid waste industry faces complex and challenging odor issues based upon public, regulatory, and legal actions. Since odors are generally enforced through nuisance regulations, compliance can be difficult to achieve, not to mention almost impossible to define. Enforcement of odor nuisances is subjective, usually at the discretion of an environmental inspector or Air Pollution Control Officer, and often based upon citizen complaints. When citizen complaints mount, and enforcement action is leveraged, lawsuits often surface as an added ongoing challenge to waste facility operations. Now politicians are demanding action and using alleged odor violations as part of their environmental platforms. Facing odor issues can be costly and threaten the intended land-use designs that waste facilities require to serve their local communities.

DATE: Thursday, January 21, 2021

TIME: 2 p.m. ET

Click to Register

 You will receive a private link to attend. Share this page with others, but your private link from Zoom is only for you.

Register for SCS Engineers’ January webinar to learn more about the proactive strategies and practices you can implement at your critical solid waste facilities. This free webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess the potential for odor issues and, by doing so, set realistic benchmarks toward cost-effective and meaningful mitigation measures.

Our panelists bring comprehensive expertise to the table, including facility design and planning, technical experience in air quality compliance and pollutant dispersion and air measurement programs, atmospheric dispersion and transport of airborne pollutants, particularly in the area of complex terrain. They will provide decades of strategies, resources, and best practices and technologies based on successful solutions that help support your facility as you prepare for, and likely will, experience odor complaints.

The team answers questions throughout the presentation, and the second portion of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

FREE Webinar: Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

January 7, 2021

Register for SCS Engineers’ January webinar to learn more about the proactive strategies and practices you can implement at your critical solid waste facilities. This free webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess the potential for odor issues and, by doing so, set realistic benchmarks toward cost-effective and meaningful mitigation measures.

Thurs., Jan. 21, 2021   

TIME: 2 p.m. ET

Click here to register

FREE LIVE WEBINAR & Q/A

Landfills, compost facilities, transfer stations, and renewable energy plants are cognizant of odor issues and strive to minimize odors. Proactive odor management is critical to the continued success and operation of these facilities.

More so than ever before, the solid waste industry faces complex and challenging odor issues based upon public, regulatory, and legal actions. Since odors are generally enforced through nuisance regulations, compliance can be difficult to achieve, not to mention almost impossible to define. Enforcement of odor nuisances is subjective, usually at the discretion of an environmental inspector or Air Pollution Control Officer, and often based upon citizen complaints. When citizen complaints mount, and enforcement action is leveraged, lawsuits often surface as an added ongoing challenge to waste facility operations. Now politicians are demanding action and using alleged odor violations as part of their environmental platforms. Facing odor issues can be costly and threaten the intended land-use designs that waste facilities require to serve their local communities.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

You asked for it and we’re delivering – ODOR MANAGEMENT – the next SCS free webinar

December 30, 2020

Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

Register for SCS Engineers’ January webinar to learn more about the proactive strategies and practices you can implement at your critical solid waste facilities. This free webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess the potential for odor issues and, by doing so, set realistic benchmarks toward cost-effective and meaningful mitigation measures.

DATE: Thursday, January 21, 2021    TIME: 2 p.m. ET

Click here to register

Our panelists bring comprehensive expertise to the table, including facility design and planning, technical experience in air quality compliance and pollutant dispersion and air measurement programs, atmospheric dispersion and transport of airborne pollutants, particularly in the area of complex terrain. They will provide decades of strategies, resources, and best practices and technologies based on successful solutions that help support your facility as you prepare for, and likely will, experience odor complaints.

The team answers questions throughout the presentation, and the second portion of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

USGBC Panel on Landfills, Technology, and the Future

December 3, 2020

SCS Professionals Ali Khatami and David Hostetter, along with sustainability expert Leslie Lukacs will discuss “Landfills, Technology, and the Future” at a panel hosted by the US Green Building Council on December 3 (1:00 PM Eastern).

  • Dr. Khatami (Project Director and Vice President of SCS Engineers) will discuss the history of landfills and waste management, including engineering improvements to safety and environmental risk reduction;
  • Mr. Hostetter (Remote Monitoring and Controls Regional Manager of SCS Engineers) will talk about new landfill technologies, including using landfill gas to create energy from waste; and
  • Ms. Lukacs (Executive Director, Zero Waste Sonoma) will address sustainable materials management and the drive to Zero Waste, using Sonoma as a case study.
  • Jessica Wright, LEED Green Associate, TRUE Advisor, Senior Project Manager, ecoPreserve (Moderator)

Landfills are a part of what keeps our society moving. While they have their drawbacks, advances in landfill design and technology use in landfills are improving their operation and management. This panel will address what we see coming in the future to help our society manage our waste.

Event registration: https://101520landfills.eventbrite.com
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/643323933211008
LinkedIn event: https://www.linkedin.com/events/6718943429298003968/

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 1:00 pm

2020 RAM/SWANA/SWAA Webinar Series

November 12, 2020

The Recycling Association of Minnesota, the Minnesota chapter of the Solid Waste Association of North America, and the Minnesota Solid Waste Administrator’s Association teamed up to host a series of 10 webinars running every Thursday from September 10th through November 12th.

The webinars will cover such topics as

  • Solid Waste Management Industry Resilience
  • The State of Recycling and Solid Waste in Minnesota from the MPCA
  • Direction of the Solid Waste and Recycling Industry
  • Organics
  • PFAS
  • Recycling and Disposal of Green Energy Components
  • Expanding End Markets for Problem Plastics
  • Recycled Feedstock for Essential Manufacturing During COVID-19
  • Problem Landfill Materials

SCS Engineers is a sponsor of the webinars.

 

 

Click for webinar details and to register

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 2:00 pm

Rethinking Waste: The Global Resource Expo and Forum – On-Line

September 22, 2020

ISWA & WMW are presenting the complete keynote program for Rethinking Waste: The Global Resource and Forum online, September 22-23, 2020.

SCS Vice President James Law, is a confirmed speaker.  He will present on Closing Dumpsites, along with Sandra Mazo-Nix, Municipal Solid Waste Initiative Coordinator for the Climate & Clean Air Coalition.

The conference will feature several prominent industry experts who will cover topics ranging from waste management during Covid-19 to the role of waste-to-energy in the circular economy, marine plastics, the fourth industrial revolution, and much, much more.

The mission of the International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) is to promote and develop sustainable and professional waste management worldwide.  WMW is Waste Management World.

Posted by Laura Dorn at 3:00 pm

Is your facility’s odor management strategy reactive or proactive? 

October 10, 2017

Additional handling of organics and other odorous wastes can make meeting regulatory requirements more challenging.

 

Pat Sullivan discusses two case studies that provide examples of two different approaches to odor management. The proactive approach resulted in a more positive outcome than the reactive approach. Although the odor issues never go away completely, the proactive facility has avoided lawsuits and regulatory enforcement and continues to have a positive working relationship with the community.

SCS Engineers freely shares our articles and white papers without imposing on your privacy.

Click to read Part I of this two part series. We’ll let you know when Part II is published soon.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Waste and Materials Management Study Group: What’s New?

September 15, 2017

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) Waste and Materials Management Study Group (WMMSG) met August 16. Here are three key updates from the meeting.

Groundwater Monitoring
The 2014 guidance “Reducing or Terminating Groundwater Monitoring at Solid Waste Landfills” is under review. The Groundwater Monitoring subgroup completed recommendations for revision. The key proposed revisions include:

  • Option to revise sampling frequencies beyond annual sampling
  • Option to reduce the size of the monitoring well array
  • Option to reduce the number of required sampling parameters

The subgroup’s recommendations will be reviewed by WDNR staff, and then sent out for public comment before finalizing.

Alternative Landfill Caps
The Alternative Landfill Caps subgroup has developed a draft list of recommendations that include the following:

  • Develop a guidance document to outline the requirements for proposing and implementing an alternative final cover
  • Modify portions of NR 500 to revise the infiltration equivalency requirement and to provide more flexibility for alternative cover systems to allow for a longer delay in final cover system construction
  • Allow alternative closure phasing, sacrificial covering, and reclaiming airspace from settlement prior to final cover construction

The subgroup is making another round of edits to the recommendations before they are presented to WDNR staff for review and comment. Track updates on WDNR’s WMMSG web page.

Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Rule
The RD&D rule was also discussed at the last meeting, partly in relation to alternative capping options. To be consistent with federal rules, WDNR is considering revising the current Wisconsin RD&D rule (NR 514.10) to allow up to six renewals (up to 3 years each) of an RD&D Plan. This would extend the total RD&D test period to 21 years, an additional 9 years from the current 12 years allowed. With the RD&D rule reaching the 10-year mark, some sites are seeing the 12-year finish line on the horizon. WDNR cautions that the rulemaking process takes time.

More About the Waste and Materials Management Study Group
The study group provides the Waste and Materials Management Program with constructive feedback on policy and technical issues and works collaboratively with WDNR staff to find workable solutions. Find more information, meeting dates, agendas, and meeting minutes here.

For questions about how the study group impacts your solid waste operations, contact:

Tom Karwoski, PG, Vice President
Betsy Powers, PE, Senior Project Manager
Sherren Clark, PE, PG, Vice President

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SWANA Alert posted by SCS Engineers: EPA to Hold Public Hearing on the RFS Program Tuesday, August 1

July 31, 2017

Reprinted from SWANA Alert:

On Tuesday, August 1, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be holding a public hearing in Washington, DC on the proposed rule, ‘‘Renewable Fuel Standard Program: Standards for 2018 and Biomass-Based Diesel Volume for 2019.’’ In keeping with SWANA’s previous advocacy efforts in regards to the renewable fuel standard (RFS) program, we intend to submit a short written statement to be introduced into the hearing record.

The RFS program is a national policy that requires a certain volume of renewable fuel to replace or reduce the quantity of petroleum-based transportation fuel, heating oil or jet fuel. These amounts are set by EPA each year and the proposed rule will set those levels for 2018. One of the four fuel category amounts that will be set by the RFS is cellulosic biofuels, which includes compressed and liquefied renewable natural gas (RNG) produced from landfill biogas.

As a member of the SWANA Core Advocacy Group, we are notifying you that SWANA intends to submit comments to EPA on the RFS program as part of the August 1st hearing, and in post-hearing comments that EPA will be accepting through August 31st as necessary. These comments will support the testimony of other solid waste industry leaders and ask the EPA set the 2018 RVO standard for cellulosic biofuel at a level that takes into account increased generation of fuel from both existing registered projects and from new projects that will begin generating fuel in 2018. By setting the levels based upon actual current and future capacity instead of on historical data and trends, EPA will ensure that the levels set actually spur demand consistent with increased production. A failure to set the levels high enough would result in a lack of appropriate demand for these fuels, which would undercut the purpose of the RFS program

By setting the levels based upon actual current and future capacity instead of on historical data and trends, EPA will ensure that the levels set actually spur demand consistent with increased production. A failure to set the levels high enough would result in a lack of appropriate demand for these fuels, which would undercut the purpose of the RFS program.


If you or the Chapter or Technical Division members have any questions or concerns about these comments, or if you would like to discuss them further, please contact David Biderman at SWANA.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:18 pm