landfills

ISWA-SWIS Winter School 2022: Summer Edition!, Arlington, Texas

June 6, 2022

The ISWA-SWIS Winter School 2022 will now take place this Summer!  Join SCS and other industry professionals at The University of Texas, Arlington, June 6-17, for this unparalleled opportunity to advance knowledge in the field of waste management.

The event was originally scheduled to be held in January, but was postponed to June due to the pandemic.

At the joint ISWA (International Solid Waste Association) and SWIS (Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability) Winter School at the University of Texas at Arlington, waste management professionals and students from all over the world will have the opportunity to learn about the potential and challenges of sustainable waste management, including landfill and landfill mining.

The best aspect of the Winter School is the blend of training styles. The in-class, theory-based training and hands-on, operational training are perfectly balanced – with one week dedicated to each.

Themes covered include:

  • Landfill siting, design and construction, and operation
  • Landfill leachate and gas management and utilization (LFGTE)
  • Sustainable waste management (including recycling, composting, and waste to energy)
  • Waste Economics including waste business development.

Specialty areas will be extensively covered, with project case studies discussed to enhance the learning experience.

It’s not all about waste as we introduce you to Texas! The SWIS Winter School organizers plan to take all the participants to this year’s Fort Worth Annual Stock Show and Rodeo, and participants will have the opportunity to watch live NBA Dallas Mavericks basketball games.

Click for more details and registration information

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 12:00 am

Waste Expo, Las Vegas Convention Center

May 9, 2022

Waste 360’s annual conference and exhibits, Waste Expo, will take place at the Las Vegas Convention Center, May 9-12, 2022.

2022 Conference Tracks include:

  • Operations, Fleet & Safety
  • Recycling & Landfill
  • Business Insights & Policy
  • Technology & Innovation
  • and more!

Waste360’s popular Food Recovery Forum and the Organics Recycling Conference will again be co-located with Waste Expo.  SCS professionals are presenting at these sessions:

Pat Sullivan
Pat Sullivan
Monday, May 9, 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm

Pat Sullivan, Senior Vice President, is speaking on “The Pros and Cons of Composting vs. Anaerobic Digestion,” at the Composting, Anaerobic Digestion, and Other Organics Treatment Processes – Which Is Best for Your Facility? Critical Factors in the Design Process session

Tracie Bills
Tracie Onstad Bills
Tuesday, May 10, 12:45 pm – 1:45 pm

Tracie Onstad Bills, Vice President, is a panelist for the “Update on The Future of Organics in California”.  Learn about California’s SB 1383 implementation that will require 75% diversion of organic waste from landfills by 2025. Hear from industry policy leaders and composters in an interactive panel discussion regarding collection, contamination, permitting, and markets of transforming organic wastes into compost and energy products. This lively discussion will include questions from the audience on how to develop over 100 facilities at a cost of $2 to $3 billion.

Michelle Leonard
Michelle Leonard
Tuesday, May 10th 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Michelle Leonard, Senior Vice President of Sustainability Materials Management, is speaking at “The Road to Edible Food Recovery and Reducing Organics Disposal” session.  California has passed one of the most aggressive edible food recovery policies in the world. To meet the legislative requirements, municipalities across the state are actively developing food recovery programs. This session will look at several examples of municipalities in Los Angeles County and the steps they are taking. The examples will include edible food capacity planning, identifying food generators and recovery organizations, outreach to edible food generators, gathering needed data, setting up programs and training for successful recovery, matching food recovery organizations to donors, and tracking the amount of food recovered. Additionally, this session will highlight practices to recover non-edible food through organics collection and recycling programs when food recovery is not an option.

 

Audience favorites returning to Waste Expo in 2022 include:

  • Rising Leaders Talk Trash: Waste360 40 Under 40 award winners and rising leaders will share their perspective on where the waste industry is headed. They will also discuss the biggest challenges and opportunities facing the waste industry, how they got their start in the industry, current projects and initiatives they are working on, how they see the industry changing and more.
  • People’s Choice Session- Legislative Updates by Region: “Move Over” laws, climate change, recycling, extended producer responsibility (EPR), per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), cannabis waste—the list goes on. Join this panel of experts to find out the latest legislation updates in each region across the U.S. and what you should have on your radar for 2022 and beyond.
  • Nothing Wasted! Talks. Get ready to hear inspired talks from a wide array of thought leaders and visionaries! In each session, you’ll hear from three to four thought leaders, visionaries, seekers and seers who will share impactful, inspirational, influential, or even provocative ideas. You’ll walk away with powerful ideas and perspectives that will make you a more thoughtful and creative problem-solver on the job.

 

Many SCS professionals will attend WasteExpo – we hope to see you there!  Click here for program and registration information.

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am

Wisconsin Integrated Resource Management Conference Goes Virtual in February 2021

February 22, 2021

The Wisconsin Integrated Resource Management Conference (WIRMC) is the place to market your business to Wisconsin solid waste and recycling professionals.  WIRMC 2021 will take place as a virtual conference from February 22-25, 2021.  Several SCS professionals will be presenter, and SCS Engineers is a Gold Level sponsor of this important event.  Please stop by our Virtual booth!

Featured Hot Topics and Speakers include:

 

2020 Wisconsin Statewide Waste Characterization Study (Monday, Feb 22)
Speaker: Casey Lamensky, WDNR and Betsy Powers, SCS Engineers

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) has sponsored statewide waste sorts in 2002, 2009, and 2020. The 2020 study is being performed in October through December 2020 by SCS Engineers. This presentation will hit on the highlights of the project (participating facilities and methodology), share challenges and how they were addressed, and present some preliminary results and how the DNR hopes to use the information. We will discuss patterns that are standing out and lessons that can be shared.

School Sustainability Programs: Thriving in Changing Times – Panel (Tuesday, Feb 23)

Panelists include: Angeline Koch, Milwaukee Public Schools, Claire Oleksiak, Sustain Dane, Chris Jimieson, Madison Metropolitan School District, Janet Whited, Recycling Specialist, San Diego USD, moderator Debbi Dodson, Carton Council

Landfill Technology Innovations: YPs Improving Operations and Management (Tuesday, Feb 23)
Speakers: David Hostetter, Joy Stephens, Melissa Russo, and Sam Rice all of SCS Engineers

The technologies for operating and monitoring landfills are expanding and changing rapidly.  Hear from several SCS Young Professionals about the exciting developments currently underway.

Food Recycling and Rescue – A Major City’s Three-Pronged Approach (Wednesday, Feb 22)
Speaker: Michelle Leonard, Vice President, SCS Engineers

Los Angeles County’s unincorporated area is home to almost 1 million people, and each year its communities dispose of approximately 128,000 tons of food. At the same time, approximately 1 in 7 individuals are food insecure, lacking regular access to quality nutritious meals. In the last three years, Los Angeles County Public Works has launched a number of programs to reduce wasted food. These include in-house recycling, food scraps collection, and edible food recovery. These programs have saved millions of pounds of food from going to waste. We will provide attendees with detailed information on food recycling and donation. Details will include how the programs were envisioned, the planning process undertaken by the County, the program results, and the County’s next steps, and will provide suggestions for how other communities can implement a successful food recycling and donation program.

Changing Air Rules for Landfills (Thursday, Feb 25)
Speaker: Mark Hammers, SCS Engineers

On March 26, 2020, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) finalized amendments to the 2003 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. The NESHAP rules affect air permits and landfill gas system operating requirements for most active landfills. Some of the changes, like revised wellhead operational standards, may be welcomed by permittees. Other changes include additional monitoring requirements for wells operating at higher temperatures, and correction and clarification of Startup, Shutdown, and Malfunction (SSM) requirements. State agencies with air permitting authority are now incorporating the new NESHAP requirements into Title V permits. The interaction between the recently amended NESHAP rules and existing New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) rules (Subpart WWW and Subpart XXX) is creating some unique challenges. Learn about these unique challenges along with the history, applicability, timelines, and primary requirements of the revised NESHAP.

 

Click for more information and to register

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 12:00 pm

FREE Webinar: Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

January 18, 2021

landfill facility odor management

Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

 

FREE ON-DEMAND WEBINAR & Q/A – RECORDED JAN.21, 2021

 

Landfills, compost facilities, transfer stations, and renewable energy plants are cognizant of odor issues and strive to minimize odors. Proactive odor management is critical to the continued success and operation of these facilities.

More so than ever before, the solid waste industry faces complex and challenging odor issues based upon public, regulatory, and legal actions. Since odors are generally enforced through nuisance regulations, compliance can be difficult to achieve, not to mention almost impossible to define. Enforcement of odor nuisances is subjective, usually at the discretion of an environmental inspector or Air Pollution Control Officer, and often based upon citizen complaints. When citizen complaints mount, and enforcement action is leveraged, lawsuits often surface as an added ongoing challenge to waste facility operations. Now politicians are demanding action and using alleged odor violations as part of their environmental platforms. Facing odor issues can be costly and threaten the intended land-use designs that waste facilities require to serve their local communities.

SCS Engineers’ January webinar was for those who want to learn more about the proactive strategies and practices you can implement at your critical solid waste facilities. This free webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess the potential for odor issues and, by doing so, set realistic benchmarks toward cost-effective and meaningful mitigation measures.

Our panelists bring comprehensive expertise to the table, including facility design and planning, technical experience in air quality compliance and pollutant dispersion and air measurement programs, atmospheric dispersion and transport of airborne pollutants, particularly in the area of complex terrain. They will provide decades of strategies, resources, and best practices and technologies based on successful solutions that help support your facility as you prepare for, and likely will, experience odor complaints.

The team answers questions throughout the presentation, and the second portion of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

FREE Webinar: Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

January 7, 2021

Register for SCS Engineers’ January webinar to learn more about the proactive strategies and practices you can implement at your critical solid waste facilities. This free webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess the potential for odor issues and, by doing so, set realistic benchmarks toward cost-effective and meaningful mitigation measures.

Thurs., Jan. 21, 2021   

TIME: 2 p.m. ET

Click here to register

FREE LIVE WEBINAR & Q/A

Landfills, compost facilities, transfer stations, and renewable energy plants are cognizant of odor issues and strive to minimize odors. Proactive odor management is critical to the continued success and operation of these facilities.

More so than ever before, the solid waste industry faces complex and challenging odor issues based upon public, regulatory, and legal actions. Since odors are generally enforced through nuisance regulations, compliance can be difficult to achieve, not to mention almost impossible to define. Enforcement of odor nuisances is subjective, usually at the discretion of an environmental inspector or Air Pollution Control Officer, and often based upon citizen complaints. When citizen complaints mount, and enforcement action is leveraged, lawsuits often surface as an added ongoing challenge to waste facility operations. Now politicians are demanding action and using alleged odor violations as part of their environmental platforms. Facing odor issues can be costly and threaten the intended land-use designs that waste facilities require to serve their local communities.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

You asked for it and we’re delivering – ODOR MANAGEMENT – the next SCS free webinar

December 30, 2020

Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

Register for SCS Engineers’ January webinar to learn more about the proactive strategies and practices you can implement at your critical solid waste facilities. This free webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess the potential for odor issues and, by doing so, set realistic benchmarks toward cost-effective and meaningful mitigation measures.

DATE: Thursday, January 21, 2021    TIME: 2 p.m. ET

Click here to register

Our panelists bring comprehensive expertise to the table, including facility design and planning, technical experience in air quality compliance and pollutant dispersion and air measurement programs, atmospheric dispersion and transport of airborne pollutants, particularly in the area of complex terrain. They will provide decades of strategies, resources, and best practices and technologies based on successful solutions that help support your facility as you prepare for, and likely will, experience odor complaints.

The team answers questions throughout the presentation, and the second portion of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Is your facility’s odor management strategy reactive or proactive? 

October 10, 2017

Additional handling of organics and other odorous wastes can make meeting regulatory requirements more challenging.

 

Pat Sullivan discusses two case studies that provide examples of two different approaches to odor management. The proactive approach resulted in a more positive outcome than the reactive approach. Although the odor issues never go away completely, the proactive facility has avoided lawsuits and regulatory enforcement and continues to have a positive working relationship with the community.

SCS Engineers freely shares our articles and white papers without imposing on your privacy.

Click to read Part I of this two part series. We’ll let you know when Part II is published soon.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Waste and Materials Management Study Group: What’s New?

September 15, 2017

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) Waste and Materials Management Study Group (WMMSG) met August 16. Here are three key updates from the meeting.

Groundwater Monitoring
The 2014 guidance “Reducing or Terminating Groundwater Monitoring at Solid Waste Landfills” is under review. The Groundwater Monitoring subgroup completed recommendations for revision. The key proposed revisions include:

  • Option to revise sampling frequencies beyond annual sampling
  • Option to reduce the size of the monitoring well array
  • Option to reduce the number of required sampling parameters

The subgroup’s recommendations will be reviewed by WDNR staff, and then sent out for public comment before finalizing.

Alternative Landfill Caps
The Alternative Landfill Caps subgroup has developed a draft list of recommendations that include the following:

  • Develop a guidance document to outline the requirements for proposing and implementing an alternative final cover
  • Modify portions of NR 500 to revise the infiltration equivalency requirement and to provide more flexibility for alternative cover systems to allow for a longer delay in final cover system construction
  • Allow alternative closure phasing, sacrificial covering, and reclaiming airspace from settlement prior to final cover construction

The subgroup is making another round of edits to the recommendations before they are presented to WDNR staff for review and comment. Track updates on WDNR’s WMMSG web page.

Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Rule
The RD&D rule was also discussed at the last meeting, partly in relation to alternative capping options. To be consistent with federal rules, WDNR is considering revising the current Wisconsin RD&D rule (NR 514.10) to allow up to six renewals (up to 3 years each) of an RD&D Plan. This would extend the total RD&D test period to 21 years, an additional 9 years from the current 12 years allowed. With the RD&D rule reaching the 10-year mark, some sites are seeing the 12-year finish line on the horizon. WDNR cautions that the rulemaking process takes time.

More About the Waste and Materials Management Study Group
The study group provides the Waste and Materials Management Program with constructive feedback on policy and technical issues and works collaboratively with WDNR staff to find workable solutions. Find more information, meeting dates, agendas, and meeting minutes here.

For questions about how the study group impacts your solid waste operations, contact:

Tom Karwoski, PG, Vice President
Betsy Powers, PE, Senior Project Manager
Sherren Clark, PE, PG, Vice President

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SWANA Alert posted by SCS Engineers: EPA to Hold Public Hearing on the RFS Program Tuesday, August 1

July 31, 2017

Reprinted from SWANA Alert:

On Tuesday, August 1, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be holding a public hearing in Washington, DC on the proposed rule, ‘‘Renewable Fuel Standard Program: Standards for 2018 and Biomass-Based Diesel Volume for 2019.’’ In keeping with SWANA’s previous advocacy efforts in regards to the renewable fuel standard (RFS) program, we intend to submit a short written statement to be introduced into the hearing record.

The RFS program is a national policy that requires a certain volume of renewable fuel to replace or reduce the quantity of petroleum-based transportation fuel, heating oil or jet fuel. These amounts are set by EPA each year and the proposed rule will set those levels for 2018. One of the four fuel category amounts that will be set by the RFS is cellulosic biofuels, which includes compressed and liquefied renewable natural gas (RNG) produced from landfill biogas.

As a member of the SWANA Core Advocacy Group, we are notifying you that SWANA intends to submit comments to EPA on the RFS program as part of the August 1st hearing, and in post-hearing comments that EPA will be accepting through August 31st as necessary. These comments will support the testimony of other solid waste industry leaders and ask the EPA set the 2018 RVO standard for cellulosic biofuel at a level that takes into account increased generation of fuel from both existing registered projects and from new projects that will begin generating fuel in 2018. By setting the levels based upon actual current and future capacity instead of on historical data and trends, EPA will ensure that the levels set actually spur demand consistent with increased production. A failure to set the levels high enough would result in a lack of appropriate demand for these fuels, which would undercut the purpose of the RFS program

By setting the levels based upon actual current and future capacity instead of on historical data and trends, EPA will ensure that the levels set actually spur demand consistent with increased production. A failure to set the levels high enough would result in a lack of appropriate demand for these fuels, which would undercut the purpose of the RFS program.


If you or the Chapter or Technical Division members have any questions or concerns about these comments, or if you would like to discuss them further, please contact David Biderman at SWANA.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:18 pm

SCS Regulatory Alert: Industrial Storm Water Permit Coverage for Wisconsin Landfills

September 13, 2016

For years, Wisconsin landfills have relied on compliance with the storm water (stormwater) management requirements in the Chapter NR 500 code series to achieve compliance with the NR 216 storm water standards. Effective June 15, 2016, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) changed their policy, and now requires landfills and associated non-commercial borrow sites to obtain separate industrial storm water permit coverage.

Read the SCS Engineers Technical Bulletin to determine what action you may be required to take and by what date.

  • September 19, 2016, submit a Notice of Intent (NOI) form to WDNR.
  • WDNR will review your NOI and determine if your facility can be covered under the Tier 2 Industrial Storm Water Permit.
  • January 31, 2017, submit a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) Summary Form. This also requires preparation of a SWPPP report designed to prevent storm water discharges of pollutants to waters of the state.

If you have questions or need help filing or developing a plan, please contact:

Betsy Powers, PE

(608) 216-7347

Sherren Clark, PE, PG

(608) 216-7323

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am