environmental compliance

WASTECON 2022

December 5, 2022

WASTECON 2022 will take place December 5-8, 2022, at the San Diego Convention Center.  SCS Engineers will be right up front in Booth 503 with demos and our experts at hand.  This year’s event is extra special as WASETCON is celebrating its 60th Anniversary!

The WASTECON Education Experience

WASTECON helps public sector solid waste leaders and their teams plan sustainable futures for their communities.  The WASTECON Education Experience is specifically curated to provide leadership and management education through a solid waste lens. What you will experience is unlike any other in the industry. Examples of topics and forms are listed below:

  • Can’t-miss plenary experiences – motivating and thought-provoking keynotes.
  • Transformational learning experiences – wisdom, insights, and increased sharing.
  • Solution-centric leadership experiences – including educational opportunities and demos by sponsoring solution providers.
  • Designed for cities and counties to optimize their training budgets for leadership teambuilding.
  • Focus on soft skills that helps public sector professionals be better change agents for the communities they serve.
  • Providing the best-in-class, relevant education for today’s solid waste leader

The WASTECON Safety Summit Returns

SWANA’s Safety Summit is returning to WASTECON 2022 to provide the latest in industry health and safety information and practices. This curated series of sessions will help safety leaders better protect collection and post-collection workers while developing a stronger safety culture for all. Attendees will gain:

  • Best practices and tips for improving safety from industry-leading experts.
  • Insights into the latest technologies and how to apply them for safer operations.
  • A better understanding of how other municipalities handle health and safety challenges.

The WASTECON Networking Experience

A premium and intentional networking experience. Staff and volunteer leaders go out of their way to deliver radical hospitality and connect attendees, speakers, solution providers, exhibitors, and sponsors. Some examples of SWANA’s commitment to creating an excellent networking experience include:

  • Building in plenty of time for networking throughout the WASTECON experience.
  • Electronic and in-person tips to maximize your WASTECON experience.

 

For more details and registration information, visit the Wastecon 2022 Website

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:00 am

Potential Geochemical Effects of CO2 and Brine Leakage – Implications for CCUS Testing and Monitoring

August 3, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting

 

Potential Geochemical Effects of CO2 and Brine Leakage on a Dilute Aquifer and Implications for CCUS Testing and Monitoring Plans

 

Establishing a site-specific groundwater monitoring protocol sensitive to changes in the groundwater chemistry related to potential leakage and also sensitive to natural variability will be imperative for developing cost-effective and robust testing and monitoring plans.

In CCUS projects, a site-specific testing and monitoring plan is mandatory to ensure the protection of underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) from Class VI injection well practices. As these projects have long durations with multiple phases, it is imperative for the groundwater monitoring program to be cost-effective with a robust sensitivity to detect any leakage.

Previously demonstrated changes in pH, carbonate chemistry, and certain trace elements (i.e., those that form strong-complexing anions) are geochemical indicators of initial CO2 leakage in relatively dilute aquifers. In this case study, SCS Engineers examine the sensitivity of dilute aquifer chemistry (major and minor cations and anions) to the leakage of CO2 and brines from the injection formation. We use an inverse thermodynamic modeling approach to simulate the effect of the progressive intrusion of CO2 and brines from the injection zone on the geochemical composition of the overlying dilute aquifer waters. From this, we can infer which geochemical parameters are most likely to be affected by the potential intrusion of CO2 and brines.

To attend this live presentation of Geochemical Effects of CO2, register for the upcoming National Carbon Capture Conference on November 8-9 in Des Moines, Iowa. Visit SCS Engineers at booth 120. Meet Kacey Garber.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 7:00 am

Optimize Protection of USDWs

August 1, 2022

 

Optimize Protection of USDWs – Minimize the Sitewide False Positive Rate

 

EPA permit requirements for Class VI injection wells explicitly include incorporating a Testing and Monitoring Plan to optimize protection of USDWs – Underground Sources of Drinking Water. The regulatory requirement is for periodic monitoring of groundwater quality above the confining zone that may result from injection fluid movement through the confining zone. Testing and monitoring plans usually implement an antidegradation strategy. Take sufficient background data to characterize the statistical distributions of groundwater quality parameters before operation. Then the same water quality parameters are sampled periodically during and after injection and compared to the background. Any statistically significant increases over the background are investigated as a possible result of injectate migration above the confining zone.

To make the detection monitoring program more robust, there is a tendency to increase the number of well/parameter pairs in the monitoring network. This is done by adding additional wells to decrease well spacing and by adding monitoring parameters to make sure that nothing gets missed. Paradoxically, this tendency decreases the statistical power of the groundwater monitoring network by increasing the sitewide false positive rate (i.e., the number of false positive detections increases, often to an unreasonable degree). Each apparent statistically significant increase involves a costly investigation with greatly increased complexity. In this talk, we examine the sitewide false positive rate for sitewide groundwater monitoring networks and its relationship to the number of well/parameter pairs and discuss how hydrologic and geochemical knowledge and characterization can be used to build a more robust and cost-effective groundwater monitoring plan that is protective of USDWs near Class VI injection wells.

 

To attend this live presentation, register for the upcoming National Carbon Capture Conference November 8-9 in Des Moines, Iowa. Visit SCS Engineers at booth 120. Meet Charles Hostetler.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 11:06 am

Managing PFAS in Landfill Leachate and Sludge In a Changing Regulatory Climate

July 21, 2022

Managing PFAS in Landfill Leachate and Sludge In a Changing Regulatory Climate 

Did you miss the free client webinar? No problem; it’s now available for you on-demand.  Feel free to share this link with others who may be interested too.

 

 

Landfill operators must contend with incoming PFAS-laden waste streams while managing leachate and sludges potentially contaminated with concentrated levels of PFAS. Sifting through incoming waste, C&D, and special wastes is not feasible. Staying abreast of the rapidly changing regulatory climate and treatment options will help you plan for the ultimate outcomes.

In July’s client webinar, our panelists aim to clarify the flurry of recent plans, health advisories, and announcements while discussing where the analytical methods fall short. We’ll cut through the intimidating headlines in the media and focus on the EPA Action Plan and recent regulatory and proposed changes that are worth monitoring.

Following trends across North American landfills, we will discuss available and promising leachate treatment options. SCS’s engineers, scientists, and landfill operations experts will be at your service throughout the forum and afterward.

                                                              

This educational, non-commercial webinar with a Q&A forum throughout is free and open to all who want to learn more about landfill PFAS regulations and leachate treatments. We recommend this month’s discussion for landfill owners/operators, solid waste planners, environmental engineers, municipalities, and environmental agency staff.

Certificates of Attendance are available for attendees who register on Zoom and attend the live session. Sharing another person’s link to join the live session does not register your name. SCS does not sell or share any data collected at Zoom registration.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 2:00 pm

Methane Measuring, Monitoring, Modeling and Methods

July 20, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting
As technologies and policies evolve, so have the ways SCS Engineers take measurements depending on each landfill’s unique characteristics and infrastructure.

 

Many landfills are still using hand-held monitoring of methane “hot spots” for compliance purposes while relying on models to estimate LFG emissions. Although technological developments in optical remote sensing and other methods offer significant improvements to measuring actual surface emissions from landfills, no single technology or method has risen to the top of the scientific hierarchy, gained universal acceptance, and achieved regulatory approval. Clearly, the technological advances provide more comprehensive methods for measuring methane concentration, identifying methane hot spots and leaks, and providing better coverage of the entire landfill surface. However, some technology falls short in their ability to provide accurate, consistent, and repeatable methane flux or emissions measurements.

As monitoring technology evolves, so have the various ways SCS takes measurements, from source level, drones, and high-altitude aircraft, to satellites. This paper presented at A&WMA by Patrick Sullivan and Raymond Huff summarises and provides details on the following methods:

• First order decay (FOD) modeling for landfills without active LFG collection systems.
• Non-FOD modeling for landfills without active LFG collection systems.
• FOD modeling with measured LFG collection.
• Non-FOD models with various site-specific data input.
• Measured LFG collection with estimated collection efficiency.
• Surface emission monitoring for compliance purposes.
• Ground-based or low-altitude imaging for concentration or hot spot measurement.
• Satellite and aerial imaging for concentration or hot spot measurement.
• Flux chamber testing.
• Ground-level plume measurement.
• Micrometeorology.
• Stationary path measurement.
• Reverse air dispersion modeling.
• Tracer studies.
• Low or high-altitude imaging.
• Hybrid methods.

 

Click to read The Evolution of Methane Emissions Measurements at Landfills: Where are We Now?

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:02 am

ENR Top 500 Sourcebook Publishes, SCS Top in Solid Waste

July 18, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting
SCS Engineers’ team coordination with our clients and full service helps increase efficiencies in our work.

 

Engineering News Report’s Top 500 Environmental Sourcebook was published today.  SCS continues to rank #1 in Solid Waste services and top-tier rankings in Sewer & Waste, Hazardous Waste, Chemical & Soil Remediation, and Site Assessment & Compliance.

ENR is one of the premier companies tracking the A&E industry, and these rankings are closely followed as they publish throughout the year. The ENR Top 500 Design Sourcebook, which publishes annually in April, also ranks SCS Engineers among the top 100 of 500 global design-engineering firms at #59.

 

We thank our clients and our employee-owners for helping SCS continue to rank as an ENR Top 500 environmental services engineering, consulting, and construction firm.

 

Climate change and reducing our nation’s carbon footprint are important challenges facing our planet. SCS Engineers remains a leader in recovering and utilizing methane from landfills, a potent greenhouse gas. In the last two decades, we’ve expanded our role to include the utilization of biogas from agriculture, carbon sequestration, management of other greenhouse gas, and environmental impacts for multiple sectors while reducing methane production in landfills by diverting organics.

SCS designs and supports innovative environmental solutions with our in-house award-winning technologies to help our clients. With more data and control available 24/7, our clients can make more informed decisions, operate more efficiently, running cleaner and safer while delivering essential services, products, and properties.  As employee-owners, we aim to seek the most efficient and clean operations for our clients, who are responsible for delivering essential services and supporting our nation’s economy.

Our environmental work is ongoing with many new exciting ways to support our clients and communities; it’s rewarding to share this recognition with our thanks to you.

 

Join SCS Engineers!

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:02 am

SCS Webinar: Untangling the Proposed PFAS Regulations

July 11, 2022

proposed PFAS regulation impacts some landfill leachate and sludge

 

SCS Engineers is hosting a panel on proposed PFAS regulations as EPA continues to work on its goal of adding PFOA and PFOS as hazardous constituents under CERCLA – aka Superfund. EPA is also considering adding certain PFAS as hazardous constituents under Appendix VIII of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act or RCRA, giving EPA authority to require RCRA corrective action for PFAS at RCRA sites. With data for about 14 PFAS constituents, including some of the newer ones commonly known as GenX, and based on toxicity data, the EPA supports the development of standards for risk-based concentration levels and risk screening levels for ingesting PFAS.

In July’s client webinar, our panelists aim to bring clarity and advice to those operating landfills that may become subject to regulations. The free webinar features a panel of speakers clarifying the recent plans, headlines and health advisories surrounding PFAS, as well as sharing some promising leachate treatment options. SCS’s engineers, scientists and landfill operations experts will speak during the forum and answer your questions. They are also available for follow-up after the 2 p.m. July 21 webinar.

Landfill operators who manage waste streams, leachate and sludges possibly laden with PFAS can attend this event and learn about the latest regulatory changes and proposals surrounding PFAS.

 

Reserve your spot, or learn more about proposed PFAS regulations

Managing PFAS in Landfill Leachate and Sludge In a Changing Regulatory Climate.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Untangling the Proposed PFAS Regulations – SCS Webinar

July 6, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting
Landfill operators must contend with incoming PFAS-laden waste streams while managing leachate and sludges potentially contaminated with concentrated levels of PFAS.

 

Reprint from a Recycling Today article by Managing Editor Bob Gaetjens.

SCS Engineers to host panel on proposed PFAS regulations

As the EPA considers regulating PFAS, SCS Engineers helps bring clarity and advice to those operating landfills that may become subject to regulations.

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are under the sharp gaze of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which plans to determine how toxic the substance is.

There now is data for about 14 PFAS constituents, including some of the newer ones commonly known as GenX. Based on toxicity data, the EPA supports the development of standards for risk-based concentration levels and risk screening levels for ingesting PFAS. The state of Maine announced earlier this year a ban on PFAS in landfill leachate.

The EPA is considering whether to propose that perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanicsulfonic acid (PFOS) be classified as hazardous PFAS constituents under Appendix VIII of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), giving the federal agency the authority to require corrective action for PFAS and RCRA sites.

It is with this background that SCS Engineers is hosting a webinar featuring a panel of speakers clarifying the recent plans, headlines and health advisories surrounding PFAS, as well as sharing some promising leachate treatment options. SCS’s engineers, scientists and landfill operations experts will be featured during the forum and can be available for follow-up after the 2 p.m. July 21 webinar.

Landfill operators who manage waste streams, leachate and sludges possibly laden with PFAS can attend this event and learn about the latest regulatory changes and proposals surrounding PFAS.

Certificates of attendance are available for attendees who registered on Zoom and attended the live session.

 

Reserve your spot, or learn more about Managing PFAS in Landfill Leachate and Sludge In a Changing Regulatory Climate here.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Women in Environmental Services – SCS Welcomes Amy L. Guilfoyle

June 24, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting

 

Amy Guilfoyle joins SCS Engineers as a Project Director specializing in performing and managing Phase I/II environmental site assessments; contamination assessments; remedial planning and implementation; tank closures; permit applications; SPCC plans; Brownfields grants, and compliance audits.

Amy brings years of experience helping her clients prepare environmental compliance reporting and due diligence associated with land reuse, making these projects successful for communities and businesses. She feels her knowledge of Florida’s Department of Environmental Protection Standard Operating Procedures, Florida Administrative Code, Petroleum Restoration Program procedures, Low Scored Site Initiative, and legislator and compliance agency personnel help keep projects on track and support plans for more sustainable development.

Amy’s combination of leadership skills, field experience, and environmental consulting, as SCS clients know, leads to more sustainable and economically viable environmental solutions. Her fieldwork includes the installation of monitoring wells using conventional and sonic rigs; direct push technology sampling; soil, sediment, and groundwater sampling; storage tank closures; spill bucket closures; Phase I/II ESAs; site assessments; remedial actions; NPDES Permits; SPCC Plans; TIER II; stormwater compliance; Industrial Wastewater Permit compliance; safety audits, and waste management.

Guilfoyle serves on the Seminole County Port Authority Board of Directors and is the former President of the Florida Association of Environmental Professionals, Central Florida Association of Environmental Professionals, and the Metropolitan Environmental Training Alliance.

As a national employee-owned environmental engineering, consulting, and construction firm, SCS seeks professionals like Amy with a demonstrated commitment to their clients, environment, and community. Amy volunteers time to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge and STEM-related events that reflect her mission of making a positive difference.

Amy grew up in Bradenton, Florida. Her environmental career began with an internship at the Orange County Landfill while attending the University of Central Florida in Orlando, where she earned a Bachelor of Science in Biology. She is honored with leadership recognition from the Zweig Group’s ElevateHER Program, a National Association of Environmental Professionals President’s Service Award, and by the Orlando Business Journal as one of the Women to Watch Honorees, Women Who Mean Business Awards.

 

If you are interested in working with environmental leaders like Amy Guilfoyle, please visit SCS’s website to see our open positions.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Permitting Requirements for Groundwater Monitoring for Carbon Sequestration and Storage

June 22, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting
Permitting for Groundwater Monitoring for Carbon Sequestration

 

Did you miss the 2022 Annual GWPC & UIC Conference in Salt Lake City? We welcome you to view SCS Engineers’ presentation by Kacey Garber entitled “Sensitivity of Aquifer Chemistry to Changes in Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure: Implications for Design of Groundwater Monitoring Protocols,” where Kacey discusses permitting requirements for groundwater monitoring for carbon sequestration and storage sites.

In her technical presentation, Kacey Garber of SCS Engineers discusses the great care taken in the design and operation of the injection of carbon compounds to ensure that the sequestration is effective and permanent. Each injection site also has permitting requirements for groundwater monitoring in any overlying aquifer as a protective measure. Because the injection and sequestration periods are long, CSS solutions need a cost-effective groundwater monitoring program with a robust sensitivity to detect any leakage. By establishing a groundwater monitoring protocol specific to the site, sensitive to changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and relatively insensitive to natural variability and hydrochemical facies changes, implementing optimal and cost-effective groundwater protection is possible. Using a case study, Kacey tells us how her team did this in detail.

Watch permitting requirements for groundwater monitoring for carbon sequestration here.

 

Kacey Garber is an experienced groundwater project manager for active and closed landfills, including routine groundwater monitoring and statistical analyses; reports and permit applications; designing sampling and analysis plans; special groundwater studies; and conducting groundwater well construction planning and design.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am