hydrogen sulfide

Four Amazing YPs Take Us On A Landfill Technology Journey

March 26, 2021

 

David Hostetter, Sam Rice, Joy Stephens, and Chris Woloszyn take us on a landfill technology journey in their recent EM Magazine article. It is amazing what these YPs are developing and implementing nationwide. The future looks bright!

 

Most equipment data and system data are collected manually for regulatory compliance; this process is time-consuming, expensive, and sometimes dangerous. Consequently, some sites only collect a few data points per day, which may not provide a complete picture of landfill operations. They also contend with the control and maintenance of remote equipment. These YPs explain how they’ve solved these challenges using RMC and SCADA systems.

Field technicians—heavily laden with instruments, printed data collection sheets, logbooks, clipboards, maps, and other gear—spend long days collecting immense amounts of data. Additional labor awaits supervisors and managers as they transcribe, digitize, or otherwise prepare the data for analysis. This team deciphers the information recorded on sheets and logbooks, often accompanied by leachate stains, mud spatters, and water damage. GIS provides a low-cost way to streamline data collection, track progress, visualize task completion, and analyze collected data to deliver an overview of the landfill’s status.

Beyond cameras, various sensors can be attached to a drone. These sensors range from infrared cameras to LiDAR sensors to gas identification tools. One such tool helps identify the presence of methane leaking out of a landfill. A drone pilot can maneuver over the entire landfill, sniffing out methane leaks and seeking out poor landfill-cover integrity, all in a matter of hours. Drones collect methane data quickly and accurately without the need for traversing the ground on foot or by vehicle.

Integration of additional automatic and manual data collection methods, such as quarterly or annual drone flights, RMC systems, and remotely monitored and controlled wellheads, provide a comprehensive view of landfill performance and overall condition. UAVs or drones allow for safe inspections, quick data gathering, and lower operating costs.

Read EM Magazine’s full article with images here.

 

 

SCS is also providing a non-commercial webinar on drone technologies providing the best return on investment in March 2021. Join us for this live, interactive session, or view the recording in our Learning Center after March 24, 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

ALERT: NJHAP regulations changes could have significant impacts on MSW landfills

March 2, 2021

landfill regulatory changes

 

On March 1, 2021, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) proposed several amendments to air quality regulations pertaining to the regulation of New Jersey Hazardous Air Pollutants (NJHAPs) as well as fumigation operations.  The NJHAP regulations changes could significantly impact MSW landfills because they include proposed changes to hydrogen sulfide regulation as a NJHAP.

Key changes are summarized as follows:

  • The NJDEP is proposing to regulate hydrogen sulfide as a NJHAP;
  • Proposing a reporting threshold for H2S of 90 lbs/yr,
  • Proposing a State of the Art (SOTA) threshold for H2S of 10,000 lbs/yr (5 tons/year).

Several potential implications could result from these proposed changes, including:

  • Facilities with existing Title V Operating permits would be required to calculate the potential to emit (PTE) emissions of H2S for existing sources. If H2S emissions are above the very low reporting threshold of 90 lbs/yr, the H2S PTE emission rate would need to be added to the Title V Operating permit during the next permit renewal or the next permit modification.
  • Facilities subject to Emission Statement reporting and emitting H2S in an amount greater than or equal to 90 lbs/yr would have to include H2S emissions in their annual emissions statements.
  • For sources with potential H2S emissions of 90 lbs/yr or more, risk screening would be needed as part of (1) an initial operating permit for a new major facility or (2) for a minor or significant modification to an existing operating permit.
  • For sources with potential H2S emissions of 10,000 lbs/yr (5 tons per year) or more, a SOTA analysis would be required with certain permit applications. A SOTA analysis involves evaluating and potentially implementing available control technologies to reduce emissions and considers both technical feasibility and economic impact.  The proposed changes could lead to the need to implement additional landfill gas collection, control, and potentially treatment systems at some landfills.

 

A virtual public hearing regarding the proposed changes is scheduled for April 8, 2021, at 4:00 PM (ET).  A link to the virtual public hearing will be posted at http://www.state.nj.us/dep/aqm/curformp.html.

Written comments are due no later than April 30, 2021, to  www.nj.gov/dep/rules/comments.

View the proposed changes may be viewed at https://www.nj.gov/dep/rules/proposals/20210301a.pdf

 

Please direct questions to your SCS Project Manager or one of our local professionals:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 5:41 pm

Hydrogen Sulfide Issues at CCR and MSW Co-Disposal Sites at the EREF-NWRA Coal Ash Forum

June 17, 2016

Jeff Marshall, PE, SCS Engineers will be presenting the topic of Hydrogen Sulfide Issues at CCR and MSW Co-Disposal Sites during the EREF and NWRA sponsored Coal Ash Management Forum in July.

The co-disposal of municipal solid waste and coal combustion residuals – particularly flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material – poses a significant concern regarding the generation of hydrogen sulfide gas.   Hydrogen sulfide has an exceptionally low odor threshold, and can pose serious health concerns at higher concentrations.  This presentation will identify the biological, chemical and physical conditions necessary for FGD decomposition and hydrogen sulfide generation.   Recommendations for reducing the potential for FGD decomposition at co-disposal facilities will be presented.  Technologies for the removal and treatment of hydrogen sulfide from landfill gas will also be addressed.

Jeff Marshall, PE, is a Vice President of SCS Engineers and the Practice Leader for Environmental Services in the Mid-Atlantic region. He also serves as the SCS National Expert for Innovative Technologies. He has a diversified background in environmental engineering and management, with emphasis on the chemical and human health aspects of hazardous materials and wastes. Mr. Marshall’s experience with hydrogen sulfide, odors, sulfate decomposition in landfills, and ash issues includes scores of projects dating back to the 1980s.

contact Jeff Marshall.

SCS Coal Combustion Residual Services

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am