Tag Archives: printers

Safe, Compliant Alternative for SPCC Secondary Containment

September 28, 2017

If your company stores oil-based inks and manages them as part of your facility’s Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan, it may be feasible to use an impracticability determination as an alternative approach to comply.

Read the article by Chris Jimieson of SCS Engineers.

The high viscosity of oil-based inks can provide an opportunity for an alternative means of complying with the secondary containment requirements of the SPCC Rule. An impracticability determination can be an appropriate option for oil-based ink you store in single walled containers at  print or similar facilities.

 

SPCC Services – SCS Engineers

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: printers

Get Ahead of the 2017 Environmental Compliance Reporting Requirements

December 13, 2016

Is your manufacturing or industrial business ready for the 2017 environmental reporting season?

Don’t let the deadlines sneak up on you.

 

SCS Engineers provides a free guide to the most common environmental reports due at the federal and state levels. Each guide includes an overview of the reporting due along with the date each state requires submission.

When SCS says free, we mean it. No need to submit your company name, no endless email trail will follow; these are free guides to download and share with others from the compliance experts – SCS Engineers.

Click to download or share each state guide:

If your state is not listed, contact the nearest SCS office to speak with a compliance professional in your area and in your business sector; SCS is nationwide.

If you have questions or need help sorting out details such as which reports apply to your business or step-by-step support on how to prepare your reports in the states listed above, contact our regional professionals.

ann-obrien-scs-engineers

 

Learn more about Ann
Ann O’Brien  1-773-775-6362

 

 

cheryl-moran-chmm-scs-engineers

 

 Learn more about Cheryl
Cheryl Moran  1-608-216-7325

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 3:00 am
Tag Archives: printers

When Do Printing Facilities Need Federal Title V Operating Permits?

August 24, 2016

Article by Cheryl Moran, CHMM

Technological advances in traditional printing and the advent of digital printing can make it more challenging to know when you need an air permit and which permit is best for your operations.

There are two main activities that may trigger air permitting – construction and operation; each of these comes with its own permitting requirements.  Always check to see if you are required to apply for a construction permit before bringing new equipment on site.  Once a source is installed, an operating permit will be necessary, which is the focus of this article.

Federal Title V operating permits (also referred to as Part 70 permits) are required for any facility that is considered a “major source” of air pollution.  For purposes of operating permits only[1], a major source is a facility that has the potential to emit (PTE) more than 100 tons per year (tpy) of any criteria pollutant; volatile organic compounds (VOC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter less than 10 microns (PM10), or more than 10 tons of any individual hazardous air pollutant (HAP) or more than 25 tpy of combined HAPs .  Permitting thresholds are lower for facilities located in non-attainment areas.

Some facilities take limits on material throughputs, hours of operation, or emissions in order to artificially lower their PTE to qualify for a Federally Enforceable State Operating Permit (FESOP).  These permits are also called “synthetic minor” permits.

Facilities that do not exceed federal permitting thresholds may still need to acquire a state operating permit.  State permitting programs have more options than ever before and several states are summarized below.

ILLINOIS:
All “emission units” are required to secure an air permit, or register with the Illinois EPA, even very small sources of air pollution.  An “emission unit” is any piece of equipment located at an emission source that has a potential to emit air pollution.  Registration of Smaller Sources (ROSS) is for operations that emit less than 5 tpy of combined criteria pollutants.  Sources with a potential to emit more than 5 tpy, but whose emissions are less than the threshold for a FESOP, may qualify for a “life-time” operating permit.

Visit for more information on the Illinois EPA permitting program.

WISCONSIN: 
ROP Type A Registration Permit is for facilities with actual emissions of less than 25 tpy for criteria pollutants and 6.25 tons per year for HAPs.

ROP Type B Registration Permit is for facilities with actual emissions of less than 50 tpy for criteria pollutants and 12.5 tpy for HAPs.

ROP C Registration Permit for Printers is only available to printers.  To qualify for this permit, emissions of each criteria pollutant are limited to 25 tons per year, and HAPs are limited to 12.5 tons per year.

General Operation Permit (GOP) for Printers applies to digital, screen, lithographic web printing (both heatset and coldset), and lithographic sheetfed printing.

 

INDIANA: 
Source Specific Operating Agreement for Surface Coating or Graphic Arts Operations is available to printers with total VOC and HAPs that do not exceed 15 lb/day (7 lb/day in select counties).

Permit by Rule may be used for facilities that qualify for an operating agreement with criteria pollutant and HAP emissions that do not exceed 20% of the major source limits.

Find more on the Indiana permit options at http://www.in.gov/idem/airquality.

Whether you are applying for a state operating permit, or a federal operating permit, all applications will go through your state environmental regulatory agency.

[1] For construction permitting purposes, the thresholds that define a “major source” are typically higher than the operating permit thresholds.

 

For more information contact Cheryl Moran at SCS Engineers, Wisconsin or Ann O’Brien at SCS Engineers, Illinois, or  for an SCS professional in your state.

Cheryl Moran is a Project Manager with SCS Engineers with more than 20 years of experience in the printing industry. She is a Certified Hazardous Materials Manager (CHMM) and has worked with air, water, and waste issues including permitting, environmental recordkeeping, reporting and monitoring programs, hazardous waste management, environmental compliance audits, and sustainability programs.

Ann O’Brien is a Project Manager with SCS Engineers.  During her 32-year career in the printing industry she was responsible for environmental compliance programs, including, but not limited to, air and water quality permitting, environmental recordkeeping, reporting and monitoring programs, hazardous waste management, environmental compliance audits, and environmental site assessments and due diligence associated with real estate transactions and corporate acquisitions.  

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: printers

EPA’s Toxic Release Inventory

August 22, 2016

 

Author: Ann O’Brien

Alert: Toxic Release Inventory Form A and Form R Reports were due July 1, 2016

The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) was created by EPA in response to several events that raised public concern about local preparedness for chemical emergencies and the availability of information on hazardous substances.

Printing is one of the industry sectors required to annually report releases of certain chemicals.  A printing facility with 10 or more full-time equivalent employees is required to report if the facility exceeds established chemical thresholds.  Note that TRI reporting is not based on the amount of emissions to atmosphere or how much waste is generated. Instead, a company that manufactures or processes more than 25,000 pounds or otherwise uses more than 10,000 pounds of a TRI-listed chemical were required to report releases of these chemicals by July 1, 2016.

There are currently over 650 chemicals covered by the TRI program including chemicals commonly used by printers, such as toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene,  glycol ethers, solvents, and metals. Of particular interest to lithographic printers is the wide use of glycol ethers in fountain solutions and more recently in cleaning solutions, to take the place of solvents with high vapor pressures.  It is important to mention that “glycol ethers” is a chemical category and within this category there are hundreds of individual chemicals that are reportable.  Safety Data Sheets (SDS) do not indicate the presence of “glycol ethers” as a constituent of a raw material so a printer must look up each listed constituent and compare it to the list of TRI chemicals to determine whether is it reportable.

For more information, contact Ann O’Brien () or Cheryl Moran () at SCS Engineers.

 

Ann O’Brien is a Project Manager with SCS Engineers.  During her 32-year career in the printing industry she was responsible for environmental compliance programs, including, but not limited to, air and water quality permitting, environmental recordkeeping, reporting and monitoring programs, hazardous waste management, environmental compliance audits, and environmental site assessments and due diligence associated with real estate transactions and corporate acquisitions.  

Cheryl Moran is a Project Manager with SCS Engineers with more than 20 years of experience in the printing industry. She is a Certified Hazardous Materials Manager (CHMM) and has worked with air, water, and waste issues including permitting, environmental recordkeeping, reporting and monitoring programs, hazardous waste management, environmental compliance audits, and sustainability programs.

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am