WIRMC

Wisconsin Integrated Resource Management Conference Goes Virtual in February 2021

February 22, 2021

The Wisconsin Integrated Resource Management Conference (WIRMC) is the place to market your business to Wisconsin solid waste and recycling professionals.  WIRMC 2021 will take place as a virtual conference from February 22-25, 2021.  Several SCS professionals will be presenter, and SCS Engineers is a Gold Level sponsor of this important event.  Please stop by our Virtual booth!

Featured Hot Topics and Speakers include:

 

2020 Wisconsin Statewide Waste Characterization Study (Monday, Feb 22)
Speaker: Casey Lamensky, WDNR and Betsy Powers, SCS Engineers

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) has sponsored statewide waste sorts in 2002, 2009, and 2020. The 2020 study is being performed in October through December 2020 by SCS Engineers. This presentation will hit on the highlights of the project (participating facilities and methodology), share challenges and how they were addressed, and present some preliminary results and how the DNR hopes to use the information. We will discuss patterns that are standing out and lessons that can be shared.

School Sustainability Programs: Thriving in Changing Times – Panel (Tuesday, Feb 23)

Panelists include: Angeline Koch, Milwaukee Public Schools, Claire Oleksiak, Sustain Dane, Chris Jimieson, Madison Metropolitan School District, Janet Whited, Recycling Specialist, San Diego USD, moderator Debbi Dodson, Carton Council

Landfill Technology Innovations: YPs Improving Operations and Management (Tuesday, Feb 23)
Speakers: David Hostetter, Joy Stephens, Melissa Russo, and Sam Rice all of SCS Engineers

The technologies for operating and monitoring landfills are expanding and changing rapidly.  Hear from several SCS Young Professionals about the exciting developments currently underway.

Food Recycling and Rescue – A Major City’s Three-Pronged Approach (Wednesday, Feb 22)
Speaker: Michelle Leonard, Vice President, SCS Engineers

Los Angeles County’s unincorporated area is home to almost 1 million people, and each year its communities dispose of approximately 128,000 tons of food. At the same time, approximately 1 in 7 individuals are food insecure, lacking regular access to quality nutritious meals. In the last three years, Los Angeles County Public Works has launched a number of programs to reduce wasted food. These include in-house recycling, food scraps collection, and edible food recovery. These programs have saved millions of pounds of food from going to waste. We will provide attendees with detailed information on food recycling and donation. Details will include how the programs were envisioned, the planning process undertaken by the County, the program results, and the County’s next steps, and will provide suggestions for how other communities can implement a successful food recycling and donation program.

Changing Air Rules for Landfills (Thursday, Feb 25)
Speaker: Mark Hammers, SCS Engineers

On March 26, 2020, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) finalized amendments to the 2003 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. The NESHAP rules affect air permits and landfill gas system operating requirements for most active landfills. Some of the changes, like revised wellhead operational standards, may be welcomed by permittees. Other changes include additional monitoring requirements for wells operating at higher temperatures, and correction and clarification of Startup, Shutdown, and Malfunction (SSM) requirements. State agencies with air permitting authority are now incorporating the new NESHAP requirements into Title V permits. The interaction between the recently amended NESHAP rules and existing New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) rules (Subpart WWW and Subpart XXX) is creating some unique challenges. Learn about these unique challenges along with the history, applicability, timelines, and primary requirements of the revised NESHAP.

 

Click for more information and to register

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 12:00 pm

Ten Years of RD&D in Wisconsin – What have we learned?

February 22, 2018

It’s been 10 years since the first Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Plans were approved allowing liquids to be applied to municipal solid waste landfills in Wisconsin. What have we learned?

Under an approved RD&D Plan, landfill operators can apply liquids other than recirculated leachate to the waste at municipal solid waste landfills. The RD&D Rule was published by US EPA in 2004, and states had the option of adopting the rule and issuing RD&D approvals. Wisconsin was an early adopter, and 13 of the approximately 30 landfill sites in the US with RD&D approvals are in Wisconsin.

This presentation will look at data from the Wisconsin landfills with RD&D Plans. Each site is required to report annually on a very detailed basis. For this presentation we will zoom out and look at the data on an aggregated basis to address big-picture questions. What are the trends in volumes applied for leachate recirculation versus RD&D Liquids? How do these volumes compare with precipitation? What liquid waste streams have been accepted and how have they been applied? How has RD&D liquid application affected landfill gas generation?

We will also provide an update on the regulatory status of the RD&D rule. On May 10, 2016, a final federal rule was published that revised the maximum permit term from 12 years to 21 years; however, WDNR will have to adopt this change in order for it to be available to Wisconsin landfills.

See event details here.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am