clean air act

Air & Waste Management Association’s ACE 2021 is Virtual

June 14, 2021

The Air & Waste Management Association’s 114th Annual Conference and Exhibition (ACE) will be held virtually, June 14-17, 2021.  The conference theme is “Environmental Resiliency for Tomorrow”.

The conference was originally scheduled to take place in Orlando, however in the interest of safety, conference organizers have created a fully-virtual, interactive format with unparalleled technical content delivered through many livestream sessions, on-demand videos, and recorded presentations, as well as interactive Q&A and networking opportunities for authors, attendees, sponsors, and exhibitors.  There are also special events for women, students, and young professionals.

ACE 2021 will unite professionals from major industry, private sector, consulting, government and education for an exciting event that will explore the ever-expanding environmental challenges and provide solutions to becoming and remaining resilient for tomorrow. This is an ideal opportunity for professionals to share their knowledge to advance the industry, and for environmental companies to showcase their products, services, and solutions with professionals motivated to build a more resilient and sustainable world.

The livestream program will feature 23 technical sessions, including:

  • EPA Priorities 2021‐2022
  • PFAS Emerging Contaminant Regulatory Trends, Research and Remediation Updates
  • New Source Review (NSR): Issues and Recent Developments
  • Energy-Water-Waste Nexus
  • Regional Haze and Aerosol Optical Properties
  • Electric Power industry ‐ Clean Air Act Accomplishments
  • PM2.5 Implementation Issues
  • AERMOD Modeling System Updates with U.S. EPA
  • Corporate Sustainability: Plans, Programs, Metrics, and Analytics
  • Climate Risk, Modelling, and MET data
  • E‐Enterprise for the Environment
  • How Does it Work? Recycling
  • Innovative Uses of Earth observations within NASA HAQAST v2.0
  • Waste Issues Roundtable
  • PM, VOC, NOx and Mercury Control Technologies

Technical program highlights:   

  • The live Keynote Plenary Session will feature high level representatives from the Biden administration that will discuss their plans to tackle climate change as well as industry representatives that will share their vision on facing the climate challenges of the future.
  • 51st Annual Critical Review (live) on Cancer and PFOA, by Scott M. Bartell and Verónica M. Vieira, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of California, Irvine.
  • The Mini-Symposium on Environmental Resiliency  
  • Over 25 panels featuring experts who will discuss the latest issues in technology and regulation including:
    • Per and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS)
    • EPA Priorities 2021-2022
    • New Source Review
    • GHG/CO2 Control Technologies & Strategies
    • Regional Haze and Aerosol Optical Properties
    • COVID-19 Impacts
    • Clean Air Act Accomplishments for the Electric Power Industry
    • Air Permitting, Legislation, and Policy Developments
  • How Does It Work? Introductory Sessions for young professionals and students 
    • How Does It Work? Solid Waste and Recycling
    • How Does It Work? Energy Production
    • How Does It Work? Environmental, Social, Governance
    • How Does It Work? Stack Testing
  • Combined technical and student poster session with audio and video recordings, live Q & A and more

Register today!  Registration is open and conference details are taking shape.  Click for updates and registration information.

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 12:00 am

New Emissions Guidelines for MSW Landfills in Virginia – SCS Engineers Technical Bulletin

June 23, 2020

SCS periodically prepares Technical Bulletins to highlight items of interest to our clients and friends who have signed up to receive them.  We also publish these on our website.

Our most recent Bulletin summarizes the 2020 Virginia State Plan for New Landfill EG approved by the USEPA on June 23, 2020.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved a Clean Air Act (CAA) section 111(d) plan submitted by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VADEQ). This plan was submitted to fulfill the requirements of the CAA and in response to EPA’s promulgation of Emissions Guidelines and Compliance Times for municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills.

The Virginia plan establishes emission limits for existing MSW landfills and provides for the implementation and enforcement of those limits. Highlights of the plan are explained in a newly published SCS Technical Bulletin.

SCS Engineers will continue to post timely information, resources, and presentations to keep you well informed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 4:50 pm

EPA Alert: Further Actions to Improve the NSR Permitting Program

December 18, 2019

REPRINT OF USEPA PRESS RELEASE

WASHINGTON (Dec. 3, 2019) — Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing several actions to clarify and improve New Source Review (NSR) permitting requirements. These Clean Air Act actions are part of a suite of measures EPA is taking to modernize and streamline the NSR process, without impeding the Agency’s ongoing efforts to maintain and enhance the nation’s air quality. These actions will improve regulatory certainty and remove unnecessary obstacles to projects aiming to improve the reliability, efficiency, and safety of facilities while maintaining air quality standards.

“NSR reforms are a key component of President Trump’s agenda to revitalize American manufacturing and grow our economy while continuing to protect and improve the environment,” said EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler. “NSR regularly discouraged companies from investing in and deploying the cleanest and most efficient technologies. Through the Trump Administration’s efforts, EPA is providing clarity to permitting requirements, improving the overall process, and incentivizing investments in the latest energy technologies.”

“For too long, New Source Review permitting requirements stifled job creation, hampered innovation and slowed the ability to modernize critical energy infrastructure. Worse, in previous administrations, the permits were weaponized, so liberal activists could delay key projects,” said U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe (OK). “New Source Review hasn’t been updated in over four decades—making it hard to integrate new technologies into our energy infrastructure. I’ve worked for years to modernize the review process, and applaud today’s action by President Trump and Administrator Wheeler to streamline the NSR permitting process.”

“One of my consistent frustrations with New Source Review is what seems to be a perverse incentive away from innovation. Thank you to Administrator Wheeler and the Trump Administration for recognizing this and finalizing these positive reforms,” said U.S. Senator Kevin Cramer (ND). “The EPA’s actions provide certainty while restoring the proper scope of the Clean Air Act.”

“I applaud the EPA for taking further steps to reform the New Source Review permitting program. NSR’s burdensome process can impede upgrades that would actually increase efficiency and improve air quality. The EPA is moving toward a better NSR program that streamlines the process without sacrificing environmental protections,” said U.S. Representative Morgan Griffith (VA-09). 

“I applaud Administrator Wheeler for implementing a strong regulatory reform agenda at the EPA. Today’s actions are a solid first step in the right direction to reform the NSR permitting program. I look forward to continue working with the Trump Administration to further reform NSR and allow America’s industry to make their units more reliable and efficient, while maintaining strong environmental standards,” said U.S. Representative Andy Biggs (AZ-05).

“President Donald Trump continues to deliver on his promise to cut burdensome regulations that strangle American manufacturing and energy development. These improvements to the New Source Review (NSR) permitting requirements will protect our air quality, while incentivizing businesses to grow and expand. I look forward to continuing to work with President Trump and Administrator Wheeler to cut needless regulations and create American jobs,” said U.S. Representative Alex X. Mooney (WV-02).

“This Administration is clearing the path for manufacturers to invest in more energy efficient technologies that conserve energy, reduce emissions, and keep U.S. manufacturers competitive,” said Portland Cement Association President and CEO Mike Ireland. “For energy-intensive industries like cement, strategic investment in energy efficiency and emissions reduction are key components of any long-term climate and sustainability strategy, and EPA’s New Source Review reforms announced today help unlock new opportunities for sustainable operation.”

Final Guidance: Revised Policy on Exclusions from “Ambient Air”

After considering public comments, EPA is issuing final guidance, identifying the sort of measures which EPA may take account of in determining whether a source owner or operator has precluded the general public from having access to its property. Where access is precluded, the portion of the atmosphere above that property is not considered “ambient air” for the purpose of conducting air quality analyses under the Clean Air Act. The guidance updates EPA’s policy to recognize that a variety of measures may be considered effective in keeping the public off a source owner/operator’s property. These measures, which account for advances in surveillance and monitoring, depend on site-specific circumstances and continue to include, but are now not solely limited to, fences or other physical barriers. State, local and tribal permitting authorities have the discretion to apply this guidance on a case-by-case basis. The regulatory definition of “ambient air,” as stated in 40 CFR § 50.1(e) to mean “that portion of the atmosphere, external to buildings, to which the general public has access,” remains unchanged.

Final Guidance: Interpreting “Adjacent” for New Source Review and Title V Source Determinations in All Industries other than Oil and Gas

EPA has also recently issued a final guidance that revises the agency’s interpretation of when multiple air pollution-emitting activities are located on sufficiently “adjacent” properties to one another that they should be considered a single source for the purposes of permitting. To determine what activities comprise a single source under the NSR and Title V air permitting programs, three factors must be satisfied: the activities must be under common control; they must be located on contiguous or adjacent properties; and they must fall under the same major group standard industrial classification (SIC) code. In this guidance, for all industries other than oil and natural gas production and processing for which there is a separate set of rules and to which this guidance does not apply, EPA adopts an interpretation of “adjacent” that is based on physical proximity only. The concept of “functional interrelatedness” would not be considered by EPA when determining whether activities are located on adjacent properties. This interpretation should help clarify and streamline the permitting process.

Additional NSR Proposals

EPA also recently issued a proposal to address minor errors that have accumulated over time in four NSR regulations. While these minor errors, such as outdated cross references and typographical errors, have not materially impeded the effective operation of the NSR program, EPA believes that it is important to remove such errors from the regulations in order to provide regulatory certainty and clarity. The proposed corrections are all considered to be non-substantive and are intended to provide clarity and precision to the NSR regulations without altering any NSR policy or changing the NSR program as a whole.

EPA is also proposing to remove from the NSR regulations various provisions, such as certain “grandfathering” provisions, that, with the passage of time, no longer serve any practical function or purpose. EPA will be taking comment on this proposal, which will be published in the Federal Register.

More information on these actions and other NSR improvements are available at: https://www.epa.gov/nsr

Coming Soon: Revisions to Petition Provisions of Title V Permitting Program

EPA is currently working to take final action on a 2016 proposal for revisions to the title V regulations. This proposal would streamline and clarify processes related to the submittal and review of title V petitions.

The proposed rule would bring more certainty for all stakeholders, including the sources required to obtain and maintain title V permits; more focused petitions; better title V permit records which are expected to result in fewer petitions; and reduced administrative burden in the EPA’s review of petitions in a tight timeframe.

Background

Congress established New Source Review as a preconstruction permitting program in the 1977 Clean Air Act Amendments. The program intended to ensure the maintenance of air quality standards around the country and that state of the art technology is installed at new plants or existing plants undergoing major modifications.

Under the NSR program, before constructing a new stationary emission source or major modification of an existing source, the source operator must determine whether the new source will emit or the project will increase air emissions above certain thresholds. If so, the operator may need to get a permit from a state government or EPA that may require installation of pollution control technology or other measures.

 

Contract your SCS project manager, or   if you have questions about the impact of these recent actions.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:03 am

Deep Decarbonization in the U.S., a New Resource for Reducing Your Carbon Footprint

February 27, 2019

An aggressive carbon abatement goal often referred to as deep decarbonization, requires systemic changes to the energy economy. The scale and complexity of these projects are enormous, but achievable in our children’s lifetime. Legal Pathways recently published a legal toolkit Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States containing key recommendations and information from its larger publication to be released later this year. Both are a treasure trove for public and private decision-makers who desire pathways to a smaller carbon footprint.

The slimmer version works as a legal guide for businesses and municipalities interested in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the U.S. While each entity may draw on some, but not all, of the publication, it is a significant resource for public and private decision-makers who desire, or are working toward meeting stricter regulatory policies.

The authors identify all the legal options for enabling the U.S. to start addressing a monumental environmental challenge. Decision-makers can use combinations of resources to achieve their desired goals by employing these legal tools.

Thirty-four chapters cover energy efficiency, conservation, and fuel switching; electricity decarbonization; fuel decarbonization; carbon capture and negative emissions; non-carbon dioxide climate pollutants, and a variety of crosscutting issues.1 Each topic area identifies the main legal issues; then covers the options involving federal, state, and local laws.

With enough detail for readers to comprehend pathways best suited for them, the book is written for those who do not have legal or environmental engineering backgrounds. The authors include options even if they are not politically realistic now, recognizing that some may have value over time by becoming a legal pathway.

Get started by downloading this informative Environmental Law Institute publication.

Integrated planning leads to success; these are SCS Engineers’ low carbon technologies and renewable energy services.

 

Notes and Citations

1 “Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States,” by M. Gerrard and J. Dernbach, Editors, 2019, Retrieved from https://www.eli.org/eli-press-books/legal-pathways-deep-decarbonization-united-states

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

EPA Proposed Updates to the Renewable Fuel Standard

June 7, 2016

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently proposed increases in renewable fuel volume requirements across all types of biofuels under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program. The proposed increases would boost renewable fuel production and provide for ambitious yet achievable growth.

The Clean Air Act requires EPA to set annual RFS volume requirements for four categories of biofuels: cellulosic biofuel, biomass-based diesel, advanced biofuel, and total renewable fuel. EPA implements the program in consultation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Energy.

EPA will hold a public hearing on this proposal on June 9, 2016, in Kansas City, Missouri. The period for public input and comment will be open through July 11, 2016.

For more information on the proposal, see www.epa.gov/renewable-fuel-standard-program/proposed-renewable-fuel-standards-2017-and-biomass-based-diesel.

For more information on the public hearing, see www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-05-25/pdf/2016-12358.pdf.

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

The NWRA and SWANA React to EPA Region 2 Common Control Issue

January 29, 2016

The National Waste & Recycling Association (NWRA) and the Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) returned comments and recommendations on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) draft Part 71 Operating Permit for Ocean County Landfill and MRPC Holdings LFGTE Operations, Permit Number: P71-0CMH-001 (Draft Permit) to EPA  Region 2 Permitting Section, Air Programs Branch. The letter was sent on January 28, 2016, to Mr. Steven C. Riva of the EPA.

NWRA and SWANA expressed concerned that the EPA’s issuance of the Draft Permit, and the circumstances under which it has been prepared, represent a significant departure from practical permitting policies and will constitute a disincentive to expand existing and develop future landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) projects around the country.

The jointly submitted comments from both not-for-profit Associations on the Draft Permit were intended to convey their members’ strong interest in these projects, which represent an economic investment in alternative renewable energy sources and the reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Both Groups have expressed concern that the EPA’s actions should not undermine those investments and the benefits derived from these LFGTE projects.

The main points of the letter cover the Associations’ disagreement with the EPA’s approach to common control. NWRA and SWANA support the position that the OCL and MRPC are two separate sources that are not under common control, and they oppose the position proposed by EPA Region 2 in the Draft Permit. Both Groups are urging EPA to re-evaluate this decision and utilize an environmentally beneficial approach when making common control determinations for landfills and third-party LFGTE plants both now and in the future. Other portions of the letter address the uncertainty that EPA’s position would create for affected facilities and how it could re-open already settled compliance expectations.

Members of NWRA and SWANA have access to the letter and may continue directing comments and questions through either Association.

Questions directed to SCS Engineers should be addressed to Pat Sullivan, Senior Vice President and the SCS National Expert on the Clean Air Act.

Learn more about SCS Clean Air Act Services, or Greenhouse Gas Services, or
Landfill Gas to Energy Services

Posted by Diane Samuels at 5:18 pm