groundwater

Potential Geochemical Effects of CO2 and Brine Leakage – Implications for CCUS Testing and Monitoring

August 3, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting

 

Potential Geochemical Effects of CO2 and Brine Leakage on a Dilute Aquifer and Implications for CCUS Testing and Monitoring Plans

 

Establishing a site-specific groundwater monitoring protocol sensitive to changes in the groundwater chemistry related to potential leakage and also sensitive to natural variability will be imperative for developing cost-effective and robust testing and monitoring plans.

In CCUS projects, a site-specific testing and monitoring plan is mandatory to ensure the protection of underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) from Class VI injection well practices. As these projects have long durations with multiple phases, it is imperative for the groundwater monitoring program to be cost-effective with a robust sensitivity to detect any leakage.

Previously demonstrated changes in pH, carbonate chemistry, and certain trace elements (i.e., those that form strong-complexing anions) are geochemical indicators of initial CO2 leakage in relatively dilute aquifers. In this case study, SCS Engineers examine the sensitivity of dilute aquifer chemistry (major and minor cations and anions) to the leakage of CO2 and brines from the injection formation. We use an inverse thermodynamic modeling approach to simulate the effect of the progressive intrusion of CO2 and brines from the injection zone on the geochemical composition of the overlying dilute aquifer waters. From this, we can infer which geochemical parameters are most likely to be affected by the potential intrusion of CO2 and brines.

To attend this live presentation of Geochemical Effects of CO2, register for the upcoming National Carbon Capture Conference on November 8-9 in Des Moines, Iowa. Visit SCS Engineers at booth 120. Meet Kacey Garber.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 7:00 am

Optimize Protection of USDWs

August 1, 2022

 

Optimize Protection of USDWs – Minimize the Sitewide False Positive Rate

 

EPA permit requirements for Class VI injection wells explicitly include incorporating a Testing and Monitoring Plan to optimize protection of USDWs – Underground Sources of Drinking Water. The regulatory requirement is for periodic monitoring of groundwater quality above the confining zone that may result from injection fluid movement through the confining zone. Testing and monitoring plans usually implement an antidegradation strategy. Take sufficient background data to characterize the statistical distributions of groundwater quality parameters before operation. Then the same water quality parameters are sampled periodically during and after injection and compared to the background. Any statistically significant increases over the background are investigated as a possible result of injectate migration above the confining zone.

To make the detection monitoring program more robust, there is a tendency to increase the number of well/parameter pairs in the monitoring network. This is done by adding additional wells to decrease well spacing and by adding monitoring parameters to make sure that nothing gets missed. Paradoxically, this tendency decreases the statistical power of the groundwater monitoring network by increasing the sitewide false positive rate (i.e., the number of false positive detections increases, often to an unreasonable degree). Each apparent statistically significant increase involves a costly investigation with greatly increased complexity. In this talk, we examine the sitewide false positive rate for sitewide groundwater monitoring networks and its relationship to the number of well/parameter pairs and discuss how hydrologic and geochemical knowledge and characterization can be used to build a more robust and cost-effective groundwater monitoring plan that is protective of USDWs near Class VI injection wells.

 

To attend this live presentation, register for the upcoming National Carbon Capture Conference November 8-9 in Des Moines, Iowa. Visit SCS Engineers at booth 120. Meet Charles Hostetler.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 11:06 am

Managing PFAS in Landfill Leachate and Sludge In a Changing Regulatory Climate

July 21, 2022

Managing PFAS in Landfill Leachate and Sludge In a Changing Regulatory Climate 

Did you miss the free client webinar? No problem; it’s now available for you on-demand.  Feel free to share this link with others who may be interested too.

 

 

Landfill operators must contend with incoming PFAS-laden waste streams while managing leachate and sludges potentially contaminated with concentrated levels of PFAS. Sifting through incoming waste, C&D, and special wastes is not feasible. Staying abreast of the rapidly changing regulatory climate and treatment options will help you plan for the ultimate outcomes.

In July’s client webinar, our panelists aim to clarify the flurry of recent plans, health advisories, and announcements while discussing where the analytical methods fall short. We’ll cut through the intimidating headlines in the media and focus on the EPA Action Plan and recent regulatory and proposed changes that are worth monitoring.

Following trends across North American landfills, we will discuss available and promising leachate treatment options. SCS’s engineers, scientists, and landfill operations experts will be at your service throughout the forum and afterward.

                                                              

This educational, non-commercial webinar with a Q&A forum throughout is free and open to all who want to learn more about landfill PFAS regulations and leachate treatments. We recommend this month’s discussion for landfill owners/operators, solid waste planners, environmental engineers, municipalities, and environmental agency staff.

Certificates of Attendance are available for attendees who register on Zoom and attend the live session. Sharing another person’s link to join the live session does not register your name. SCS does not sell or share any data collected at Zoom registration.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 2:00 pm

Permitting Requirements for Groundwater Monitoring for Carbon Sequestration and Storage

June 22, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting
Permitting for Groundwater Monitoring for Carbon Sequestration

 

Did you miss the 2022 Annual GWPC & UIC Conference in Salt Lake City? We welcome you to view SCS Engineers’ presentation by Kacey Garber entitled “Sensitivity of Aquifer Chemistry to Changes in Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure: Implications for Design of Groundwater Monitoring Protocols,” where Kacey discusses permitting requirements for groundwater monitoring for carbon sequestration and storage sites.

In her technical presentation, Kacey Garber of SCS Engineers discusses the great care taken in the design and operation of the injection of carbon compounds to ensure that the sequestration is effective and permanent. Each injection site also has permitting requirements for groundwater monitoring in any overlying aquifer as a protective measure. Because the injection and sequestration periods are long, CSS solutions need a cost-effective groundwater monitoring program with a robust sensitivity to detect any leakage. By establishing a groundwater monitoring protocol specific to the site, sensitive to changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and relatively insensitive to natural variability and hydrochemical facies changes, implementing optimal and cost-effective groundwater protection is possible. Using a case study, Kacey tells us how her team did this in detail.

Watch permitting requirements for groundwater monitoring for carbon sequestration here.

 

Kacey Garber is an experienced groundwater project manager for active and closed landfills, including routine groundwater monitoring and statistical analyses; reports and permit applications; designing sampling and analysis plans; special groundwater studies; and conducting groundwater well construction planning and design.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

2022 Annual GWPC & UIC Conference

June 21, 2022

Join SCS Engineers at the 2022 Annual GWPC & UIC Conference where we focus on groundwater protection and underground injection control (UIC). The conference features live sessions, interactive round tables,  discussion groups, and networking opportunities with both in-person and virtual attendance options. Look for these experts’ sessions, including:

 

Thursday, June 23 at 8:30-10:00 Class VI UIC
Sensitivity of Aquifer Chemistry to Changes in Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure: Implications for Design of Groundwater Monitoring Protocols,” with Kacey Garber. Using a case study, Kacey takes us through the great care taken in the design, operation, and permitting of injection of carbon compounds to ensure that the sequestration is effective and permanent. She takes us through the implementation of an optimal and cost-effective groundwater protection plan by establishing a groundwater monitoring protocol that is specific to the site, sensitive to changes in the partial pressure of protection, and relative insensitive to natural variability and hydrochemical facies changes.

 

Stephanie HillThursday, June 23 at 10:30 – 12:00 Class I UIC
Microbially Influenced Corrosion in Injection Wells: A Case Study in a Class I Well for Coal Combustion Residuals,” with Stephanie Hill. Stephanie takes us through a case study of MIC-related failure used for leachate disposal from a CCR facility. She will walk through the investigation process which included annular pressure testing, downhole caliper logging, casing thickness detection, injection fluid analysis, and metallurgical analysis to identify the cause of failure. Stephanie will cover the corrections made using a customized plan to prevent future MIC-related issues.

 

Take me to the agenda and registration for the GWPC and UIC Conference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:00 am

SCS’s Michael Simms Appointed to the Louisiana Board of Professional Geoscientists

December 3, 2021

Michael Simms – Appointed by the Governor to the Louisiana Board of Professional Geoscientists

The Louisiana Board of Professional Geoscientists oversees the approvals of hydrogeologists and like scientific professionals in the state. This is quite an honor for Mike, a hydrogeologist with more than 30 years of experience. He learned of the appointment earlier this month and just had his first meeting.

Hydrogeologists are attempting to solve some of the big questions facing the world today, including sustainable water supply, food and energy production; environmental protection; and coping with climate change. They work closely with a wide range of industries to protect groundwater and much, much more.

Congratulations, Mike!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

If a picture is worth a 1,000 words, imagine what a snapshot of your well field is worth! | SCS Engineers

September 1, 2021

SCSeTools - landfill and landfill gas technology

Landfill data collection and analysis are more tactical than ever, and landfill technology provides methods to manage and use the data to create efficiencies. With the implementation of the NESHAP, NSPS/EG requirements, Landfill Operators will monitor more often and maintain more records. Data collection mechanisms will likely broaden soon to include drone and satellite data collection as acceptable for agency requirements.

Our September 23, 2021, SCS’s Client Webinar focuses on landfill gas maintenance and how Operators find efficiencies by monitoring and collecting LFG data. Using SCS eTools, the webinar includes common scenarios at landfills and answers several questions, including:

  • How are landfill operators managing these millions of bits of data for operations, compliance reporting, and managing their landfill staff on single and multiple sites?
  • What features are most important to have in data monitoring and collection systems?
  • How does mobile technology increase efficiencies?

Demonstrations include:

  • Locating new LFG wells,
  • The cause of odors or surface emission monitoring hits by inspectors,
  • The cause of LFG migration to probes,
  • Identify obstructions in the header network,
  • Getting more gas for a power plant and preventing migration,
  • Identifying elevated temperature conditions,
  • Creating report libraries for regulatory compliance.

 

Register here for SCS’s Client Webinar: Using Data to Maximize Landfill Gas Efficiencies

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

How building on landfills could change the country’s future.

August 12, 2021

Adobe stock image licensed by SCS Engineers.
Hard to believe that once this was an open dump – these transformations are happening as we remediate properties located in prime locations for new uses as stadiums, mixed-use communities, parks, homes, offices, even ski slopes!

 

Popular Mechanics recently published an article entitled The Pungent History of America’s Garbage Mountains. The article starts with a little-known ferryman on Lake Michigan when a storm beached his craft on an offshore sandbar in July 1886. Thus started Chicago’s open dump on today’s Lake Shore Drive, home to landmarks such as the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Wrigley Building, the Chicago Tribune Tower, Northwestern University, and the Magnificent Mile – all on turn-of-the-century garbage.

Transportation centers, stadiums, and even entire neighborhoods are now built on landfills. This is a fascinating, well-written article on the history and possibilities of building on remediated properties and brownfields.

“Landfill redevelopment projects tend to be real estate projects, and you know what matters in real estate: location, location, location,” says Mike McLaughlin of SCS Engineers, who specializes in brownfields and landfill redevelopment. “A landfill in an urban area might be the only piece of open land in that area. People go to extraordinary lengths to redevelop because the property is so valuable.”

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

2021 FES | ACEC-FL Annual Conference

August 4, 2021

The Florida Engineering Society (FES) and the American Council of Engineering Companies of Florida (ACEC-FL) promote professional engineers in Florida. FES and ACEC support engineering education, advocate licensure, promote the ethical and competent practice of engineering, and further the public’s knowledge and understanding of the profession’s importance.

These firms create innovative solutions while upholding their responsibility to the public’s health, safety, and wellbeing.

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 8:00 am

TCEQ Updates Rules for CCR Management – Compliance Deadline is January 24, 2021

July 22, 2021

 

SCS periodically prepares Technical Bulletins to highlight items of interest to our clients and friends.  We publish these on our website.

Our most recent Bulletin summarizes and updates the TCEQ’S New Rules Implementing Compliance and Registration Requirements for Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) Management. In addition, this Bulletin covers TCEQ’s development of a program for implementing the Federal rules governing CCR facilities in Texas. While TCEQ’s CCR program needs to be as protective as the federal CCR rules, there are important distinctions in Chapter 352.

CCR facilities are required to submit a detailed application in 2021 to obtain a TCEQ registration by January 24, 2021. 

 

SCS’ Texas-based professionals are experts on TCEQ’s new program for registering coal combustion residue (CCR) sites. We are currently working to support multiple sites needing to meet the application deadline. Our engineers and geologists know how to use site-specific design and related technical documents to complete TCEQ’s detailed application for a registration consistent with TCEQ’s new regulatory program.

For additional information on the updated regulations, deadlines, and compliance requirements, contact:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am