leachate

SCS Webinar: Black Goo, Pluggage, and Scaling in Landfill Gas and Leachate Infrastructure

May 19, 2022

FREE ON-DEMAND WEBINAR & Q/A

Prresented Live on Thursday, May 19, 2022
2:00 pm Eastern Time for 1 hour

 

Landfills across the country are experiencing a trend ─ black goo, pluggage, and scaling in their leachate and gas collection systems. These organic and inorganic deposits are difficult to treat once they’ve seeped into liquid and GCCS systems, clogging equipment and pipes, and impacting the extraction of liquids and landfill gas.

Our panelists this month discuss best practices for identifying, treating, and possibly even preventing these chemical deposits before and after they occur within your infrastructure. We’ll also include what landfill field operations can do to identify and treat conditions that appear symptomatic of possible future issues.

No one has all the answers ─ each site’s conditions are unique. Our team of engineers, scientists, and landfill-landfill gas operations experts will provide a comprehensive discussion in May of what we are seeing and piloting in the field.

  • Samuel Cooke, PE, Chemical Engineering, Leachate & Industrial Wastewater Treatment
  • Brian Kelley, Field Services, LFG Control, Recovery, Emissions
  • Nathan Hamm, PE, Liquids Management, Industrial Wastewater & Leachate Treatment
  • Marc Lefebvre, PE, Chemical Engineering, Industrial Wastewater Treatment Studies & Designs
  • Mark Pearson, PE, Environmental Engineering, Water & Wastewater Treatment Plant Process Designs

As with all SCS Client Webinars, we’re here to answer your questions throughout the forum and afterward. Using case studies and field experience, our panelists take us through the science, environmental conditions, and technical considerations to prevent or treat this emerging challenge before it gets costly.

This educational, non-commercial webinar with a Q&A forum throughout is free and open to all who want to learn more about landfill pluggage concerns and preventative treatments to consider. We recommend this month’s discussion for landfill owners/operators, landfill gas technicians, environmental engineers, and environmental agency staff. A Certificate of Attendance is available on request following the live session.

 

EREF FUNDED RESEARCH

The University of Wisconsin – Madison is currently studying landfill black goo under an EREF grant. With permission of the landfill owner/operator the research team is requesting 1 liter samples of goo be sent to them. You may want to send more than one sample; often the goo characteristics vary across a landfill or cells. Please send samples with a point of contact and identifiers to:

Mr. Xiaodong Wang
2241 Engineering Hall
1415 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706

If your local university is sponsoring a study, the Wisconsin researchers look forward to collaborating with your team.

Posted by Diane Samuels at 2:00 pm

Preventing Black Goo, Pluggage & Scaling in Landfill Infrastructure

May 11, 2022

 

Landfills across the country are experiencing a trend ─ black goo, pluggage, and scaling in their leachate and gas collection systems. These organic and inorganic deposits are difficult to treat once they’ve seeped into liquid and GCCS systems, the pluggage slows equipment and pipes, impacting the extraction of liquids and landfill gas.

Our team of engineers, scientists, and landfill-landfill gas operations experts will provide a comprehensive discussion in May of what we are seeing and piloting in the field.

Live on Thursday, May 19, 2022

2:00 pm Eastern Time for 1 hour

Register to receive on-demand access following the live forum.

 

Register Here for Preventing Black Goo, Pluggage, and Scaling in Landfill Gas and Leachate Infrastructure

 

Prevent chemical deposits and pluggage before your pipes slow landfill gas and leachate collection.

This educational, non-commercial webinar with a Q&A forum throughout is free and open to all who want to learn more about landfill pluggage concerns and preventative treatments to consider. We recommend this month’s discussion for landfill owners/operators, landfill gas technicians, environmental engineers, and environmental agency staff. A Certificate of Attendance is available on request following the live session.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

FREE: Preventing Chemical Deposits in Landfill Infrastructure

May 2, 2022

chemical deposits clog landfill systems preventing efficient collection

 

Our panelists this month discuss best practices for identifying, treating, and possibly even preventing chemical deposits (black goo, scaling, foaming) before and after they occur within your infrastructure. We’ll also include what landfill field operations can do to identify and treat conditions that appear symptomatic of possible future issues.

No one has all the answers ─ each site’s conditions are unique. Our team of engineers, scientists, and landfill-landfill gas operations experts will provide a comprehensive discussion in May of what we are seeing and piloting in the field.

Live on Thursday, May 19, 2022

2:00 pm Eastern Time for 1 hour

 

Register Here for Preventing Black Goo, Pluggage, and Scaling in Landfill Gas and Leachate Infrastructure

 

Prevent chemical deposits (black goo, scaling, foaming) bofore your pipes plug or slow landfill gas and leachate collection. RSVP to receive a copy of the recording for on-demand access.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

FREE: Preventing Black Goo, Pluggage, & Scaling in LFG & Leachate Infrastructure

April 27, 2022

 

It isn’t often that you have the oppotunity to have a full bench of experts at your disposal for free. At SCS, it happens monthly. Join us for our next free forum covering sticky situations that clog your landfill gas and leachate pipes. Keep the gas and liquids flowing with our scientists, engineers, and field experts. Ask questions anonymously for privacy, and learn the latest strategies for preventing and mitigating pluggage.

Live on Thursday, May 19, 2022

2:00 pm Eastern Time for 1 hour 

Register Here

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 3:41 pm

Leachate Treatment and Disposal Preplanning: Preparing and Uncovering Options for Landfills

December 16, 2021

On December 16, SCS Engineers presented another free technical discussion and QA about how preplanning helps you prepare and uncover leachate treatment and disposal options at landfills.

If you missed it, click here for the recording that includes the Q&A!

The waste industry works hard to stay on top of a diverse and complex mix of leachate contaminants — heavy metals, ammonia, and biochemical oxygen demand, among them. Lately, we have even more to think about, including keeping concentrations of these contaminants within the wastewater treatment plant’s tightening discharge limits and addressing compliance pressures as the list of constituents on regulators’ radar grows.

Exploring leachate treatment options to find the most fitting and cost-effective one takes vetting. Our panelists for December’s discussion and Q&A: Leachate Treatment and Disposal Preplanning: Preparing and Uncovering Options for Landfills have decades of expertise helping landfills, manufacturers, and waste facilities find the most sustainable solutions.

 

 

Watch this month’s forum about leachate treatment and disposal preplanning to inform your alternatives analysis in order to achieve the best results, including:

  • Positioning your facility or landfill to be as independent as possible using proven treatment technology
  • Compiling crucial information around current leachate generation and future projections with site-specific characteristics of the liquids to reduce risk
  • Vetting multiple leachate treatment systems and disposal options, sizing up each one to properly address your sites’ individual needs
  • Identify an interim solution if necessary.

This SCS forum is suitable for waste management, landfill, and compliance staff, managers, and engineers of all levels.

Sessions are interactive with Q&A throughout, and as always, these are non-commercial. Your privacy is protected.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 2:00 pm

New Jersey SWANA Annual Spring Conference

May 17, 2021

The SWANA New Jersey Chapter is hosting its Annual Spring Conference as a virtual event, May 17, 18, 20, and 21.

The conference is divided into four 2.5 hour sessions over four days:

Monday, May 17, 2021, 2:00 to 4:30 PM – Organic Waste Recycling Industry Update

Tuesday, May 18, 2021, 2:00 to 4:30 PM – Recycling and Innovation

Thursday, May 20, 2021, 9:00 to 11:30 AM – NJDEP Rules and Proposals

  • Featuring a presentation by SCS Engineers Senior Vice President of Environmental Services, Mike McLaughlin, PE, JD, on the NJDEP Rule Proposal Environmental Justice

Friday, May 21, 2021, 2:00 to 4:30 PM – Innovative Technologies

Click to Register

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 2:00 pm

EPA’s PFAS Interim Strategy for Certain EPA-Issued Wastewater Permits

December 23, 2020

SCS Engiineers provides regulatory updates for industrial clients

On November 30, 2020, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it is aggressively addressing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment. The agency announced two steps that it states would help ensure that federally enforceable wastewater monitoring for PFAS can begin as soon as validated analytical methods are finalized.

 

First, EPA issued a memorandum detailing an interim National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting strategy for addressing PFAS in EPA-issued wastewater permits.

EPA’s interim NPDES permitting strategy for PFAS advises EPA permit writers to consider including PFAS monitoring at facilities where these chemicals are expected to be present in wastewater discharges, including from municipal separate storm sewer systems and industrial stormwater permits. The PFAS that could be considered for monitoring will have validated EPA analytical methods for wastewater testing. The agency anticipates being available on a phased-in schedule as multi-lab validated wastewater analytical methods are finalized. The agency’s interim strategy encourages the use of best management practices where appropriate to control or abate the discharge of PFAS and includes recommendations to facilitate information sharing to foster adoption of best practices across states and localities.

 

Second, EPA released information on progress in developing new analytical methods to test for PFAS compounds in wastewater and other environmental media.

In coordination with the interim NPDES permitting strategy, EPA is developing analytical methods in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Defense to test for PFAS in wastewater and other environmental media, such as soils. The agency is releasing a list of 40 PFAS chemicals that are the subject of analytical method development. This method would be in addition to Method 533 and Method 537.1 that are already approved and can measure 29 PFAS chemicals in drinking water. EPA anticipates that multi-lab validated testing for PFAS will be finalized in 2021. For more information on testing method validation, see https://www.epa.gov/cwa-methods.

 


 

EPA continues to expand its PFAS Action Plan to protect the environment and human health.  To date, it has assisted more than 30 states in helping address PFAS, and the agency is continuing to build on this support. Across the nation, the EPA has addressed PFAS using a variety of enforcement tools under SDWA, TSCA, RCRA, and CERCLA (where appropriate), and will continue to protect public health and the environment.

The agency is also validating analytical methods for surface water, groundwater, wastewater, soils, sediments, and biosolids; developing new methods to test for PFAS in air and emissions; and improving laboratory methods to discover unknown PFAS. EPA is developing exposure models to understand how PFAS moves through the environment to impact people and ecosystems.

Related Information

  • EPA published a validated method to test for and measure 29 chemicals in drinking water accurately.
  • EPA implemented the agency’s PFAS Action Plan by proposing to regulate PFOA and PFOS drinking water, asked for information and data on other PFAS substances, and sought comment on potential monitoring requirements and regulatory approaches. The EPA anticipates proposing nationwide drinking water monitoring for PFAS that uses new methods to detect PFAS at lower concentrations than previously possible.
  • EPA is working on the proposed rule to designate PFOA and PFOS as hazardous substances under CERCLA. In the absence of the rule, EPA has used its existing authorities to compel cleanups.
  • EPA issued a final regulation that added a list of 172 PFAS chemicals to Toxics Release Inventory reporting as required by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020.
  • EPA issued a final regulation that can stop products containing PFAS from entering or reentering the marketplace without EPA’s explicit permission.

 


 

Additional information about PFAS at www.epa.gov/pfas or on the SCS Industrial Wastewater Pre-treatment website.

 

This blog references information issued from the US EPA, Office of Public Engagement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Launching Now, SCS MobileTools® App for Smarter Landfill Operations

December 15, 2020

Landfill Operations App

SCS Engineers’ newest environmental technology application is for use at solid waste facilities and landfills. These sites require specific monitoring and analyses of groundwater and liquids, landfill gas – LFG, and surface emissions critical to facility infrastructure and the environment.

Pete Carrico - SCS Field Services“We work side-by-side with our clients at hundreds of facilities nationwide. SCS MobileTools® supports operating decisions, whether our client is managing one site or hundreds,” states Pete Carrico, senior vice president and assistant director of SCS Field Services.” The App’s interface gives clients quick access to information that drives critical operating decisions and provides data for corporate directives and landfill gas OM&M programs for regional or national operations.

SCS MobileTools® is the iOS and Android mobile interface for the SCSeTools® platform. Access to data to make informed decisions is especially valuable when technicians are in the field, or operators are working remotely. Landfill and solid waste facility owners, operators, and technicians use the new application to observe system and environmental activity securely and in real-time on a mobile phone or device.

SCSETools

Featuring state-of-the-art technology, SCS MobileTools® provides users the ability to interact with a site or facility data, including site-specific monitoring and exceedance metrics for landfill gas, liquid levels, and surface emissions. Responsive, touch-enabled flow data charting is accessible, illustrating flow targets, reading dates, flow rates, and historical flow data analysis.

Generation and Disposal Trends

When compared year-over-year, generation and disposal trends produce information critical to assessing optimal options and solutions that represent significant savings for landfill gas Operations, Maintenance & Monitoring – OM&M programs. For this reason, the savings compound for regional or national operators.

For instance, monitoring and analyzing landfill gas generation and collection data against modeled estimates are valuable information. SCS MobileTools® handles the input, analysis, review, and export of landfill gas flow and related information, specifically flow rates, impacts on gas collection (e.g., extraction well liquid levels), and analytical data for data collection points.

Downloads and Demonstrations

In SCS’s release pipeline, SCS MobileTools® will include mapping and visualization functions in early 2021. SCS MobileTools® is available for download on the Apple App Store for iPhones and iPads, Google Play for Android.

 

For additional information and demonstrations of productivity-enhancing technology, contact .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Ten Years of RD&D in Wisconsin – What have we learned?

February 22, 2018

It’s been 10 years since the first Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Plans were approved allowing liquids to be applied to municipal solid waste landfills in Wisconsin. What have we learned?

Under an approved RD&D Plan, landfill operators can apply liquids other than recirculated leachate to the waste at municipal solid waste landfills. The RD&D Rule was published by US EPA in 2004, and states had the option of adopting the rule and issuing RD&D approvals. Wisconsin was an early adopter, and 13 of the approximately 30 landfill sites in the US with RD&D approvals are in Wisconsin.

This presentation will look at data from the Wisconsin landfills with RD&D Plans. Each site is required to report annually on a very detailed basis. For this presentation we will zoom out and look at the data on an aggregated basis to address big-picture questions. What are the trends in volumes applied for leachate recirculation versus RD&D Liquids? How do these volumes compare with precipitation? What liquid waste streams have been accepted and how have they been applied? How has RD&D liquid application affected landfill gas generation?

We will also provide an update on the regulatory status of the RD&D rule. On May 10, 2016, a final federal rule was published that revised the maximum permit term from 12 years to 21 years; however, WDNR will have to adopt this change in order for it to be available to Wisconsin landfills.

See event details here.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Advice from the Field: Plan for and design a landfill gas collection system with particular attention to landfill bottom liners.

November 21, 2017

We continue SCS’s Advice from the Field blog series with guidance from an article in MSW Magazine by Daniel R. Cooper, Jason Timmons, and Stephanie Liptak.

Planning a landfill gas collection system before collection is required can increase the long-term benefits for multiple stakeholders.

The authors of a recent article in MSW Management Magazine present engineering ideas that provide for more efficient construction of a GCCS.  Gas system operators will benefit by having fewer pumps to operate and maintain and shallower headers that are more easily accessible. Odor management will be easier along with other benefits.

Read the full article here to learn about the design elements for maximizing long-term benefits, impacting: bottom liners, location of the blower/flare station, leachate risers, extraction well targets, and external header piping.

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am