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ISWA World Congress 2022

September 22, 2022

“Don’t Waste Our Future”

In recent years, sustainability is all about going “circular”. Across all industries, big or small, businesses are adopting sustainability strategy to stay competitive, but weaving our economic system into one harmonious, never-ending bundle of reduce, reuse and recovery is no easy task. And in this endemic situation, as we reopen borders and economies, “don’t waste our future” is a perfect opportunity and platform for business leaders and entrepreneurs, technology developers, solutions providers as well as policymakers to gather and discuss, What are the key trends and the opportunities for investors and businesses in Asia? How can we reinvent resource recovery and regeneration to promote decarbonization and climate change? How can we leverage technology, innovation, and sustainable solutions in order to rebuild faster and better? And also, how can we unleash young talents to contribute to future business sustainability?

Internal ISWA meetings will take place 2 days prior to the ISWA World Congress. Details to follow.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:00 am

Managing PFAS in Landfill Leachate and Sludge In a Changing Regulatory Climate

July 21, 2022

Managing PFAS in Landfill Leachate and Sludge In a Changing Regulatory Climate 

Did you miss the free client webinar? No problem; it’s now available for you on-demand.  Feel free to share this link with others who may be interested too.

 

 

Landfill operators must contend with incoming PFAS-laden waste streams while managing leachate and sludges potentially contaminated with concentrated levels of PFAS. Sifting through incoming waste, C&D, and special wastes is not feasible. Staying abreast of the rapidly changing regulatory climate and treatment options will help you plan for the ultimate outcomes.

In July’s client webinar, our panelists aim to clarify the flurry of recent plans, health advisories, and announcements while discussing where the analytical methods fall short. We’ll cut through the intimidating headlines in the media and focus on the EPA Action Plan and recent regulatory and proposed changes that are worth monitoring.

Following trends across North American landfills, we will discuss available and promising leachate treatment options. SCS’s engineers, scientists, and landfill operations experts will be at your service throughout the forum and afterward.

                                                              

This educational, non-commercial webinar with a Q&A forum throughout is free and open to all who want to learn more about landfill PFAS regulations and leachate treatments. We recommend this month’s discussion for landfill owners/operators, solid waste planners, environmental engineers, municipalities, and environmental agency staff.

Certificates of Attendance are available for attendees who register on Zoom and attend the live session. Sharing another person’s link to join the live session does not register your name. SCS does not sell or share any data collected at Zoom registration.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 2:00 pm

Methane Measuring, Monitoring, Modeling and Methods

July 20, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting
As technologies and policies evolve, so have the ways SCS Engineers take measurements depending on each landfill’s unique characteristics and infrastructure.

 

Many landfills are still using hand-held monitoring of methane “hot spots” for compliance purposes while relying on models to estimate LFG emissions. Although technological developments in optical remote sensing and other methods offer significant improvements to measuring actual surface emissions from landfills, no single technology or method has risen to the top of the scientific hierarchy, gained universal acceptance, and achieved regulatory approval. Clearly, the technological advances provide more comprehensive methods for measuring methane concentration, identifying methane hot spots and leaks, and providing better coverage of the entire landfill surface. However, some technology falls short in their ability to provide accurate, consistent, and repeatable methane flux or emissions measurements.

As monitoring technology evolves, so have the various ways SCS takes measurements, from source level, drones, and high-altitude aircraft, to satellites. This paper presented at A&WMA by Patrick Sullivan and Raymond Huff summarises and provides details on the following methods:

• First order decay (FOD) modeling for landfills without active LFG collection systems.
• Non-FOD modeling for landfills without active LFG collection systems.
• FOD modeling with measured LFG collection.
• Non-FOD models with various site-specific data input.
• Measured LFG collection with estimated collection efficiency.
• Surface emission monitoring for compliance purposes.
• Ground-based or low-altitude imaging for concentration or hot spot measurement.
• Satellite and aerial imaging for concentration or hot spot measurement.
• Flux chamber testing.
• Ground-level plume measurement.
• Micrometeorology.
• Stationary path measurement.
• Reverse air dispersion modeling.
• Tracer studies.
• Low or high-altitude imaging.
• Hybrid methods.

 

Click to read The Evolution of Methane Emissions Measurements at Landfills: Where are We Now?

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:02 am

2022 NAAMC – National Ambient Air Monitoring Conference

July 19, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting
The 2022 NAAMC, sponsored by US EPA in conjunction with the Association of Air Pollution Control Agencies and the National Association of Clean Air Agencies, is a must-attend event for federal, state, local, and tribal air pollution organizations involved with operating, planning, or managing air monitoring networks and reporting data to AQS, and AIRNOW.

In addition to essential training on air monitoring topics, these SCS Engineers professionals will present the following sessions:

Sergio Valenzuela – Quantifying Salton Sea’s Harmful PM During High Wind Events

This study analyzes the correlated TEOM data (centric to high wind event days) and PQ200 data in comparison with TEOM data during “clear” (≤5-mph) days to determine the concentration levels of PM created during high wind events. Also, the incorporation of wind rose diagrams, created using wind speed/direction data collected at meteorological towers, aids in understanding varying PM concentrations relative to their deployment site properties. This study provides an essential tool for understanding the amount of exposure that neighboring communities are experiencing during high wind events and how IID’s implemented mitigation efforts will look moving forward. Read the abstract.

Jose Landeros – Air Monitoring in Mexicali, Mexico. The Evolution of Air Pollution Monitoring in a Border City.

Advancements in technology have influenced the way air pollution is measured and how air pollution data is received, shared, and acted upon by stakeholders. Using Mexicali, México as an example, this presentation will review the evolution of the air pollution monitoring technologies used to measure and inform stakeholder actions. Stakeholders now can access real-time air quality data from platforms that integrate information from low-cost sensors and regulatory sites. The evolution of technology for measuring and presenting data has been remarkable – from large, manual, analog equipment to small, automated, digital equipment with communication systems that allow for real-time data access. Read the abstract.

Additional Resources:

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Governor Reappoints SCS’s Mike Miller to Keep Nebraska Beautiful

July 14, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting

Governor Pete Ricketts has recently made appointments to fill Nebraska’s boards and commissions, including Michael J. Miller to the Governor’s Council to Keep Nebraska Beautiful (KNB). This is Miller’s third term on the nonprofit’s Board of Directors.

Mike Miller is a Vice President and Project Director in SCS Engineers’ Omaha, Nebraska office. As an environmental due diligence expert, he provides environmental management and consulting to the private and federal sectors. These services help municipalities, businesses, and industries operate efficiently and cleanly. He develops and implements environmental health & safety programs and solutions at industrial facilities in the agricultural processing, chemical processing, distribution/transportation, metals, and pharmaceutical manufacturing sectors.

An avid outdoorsman, Mike is a big fan of the School Chemical Clean-Out program and is impressed that KNB has affected projects at hundreds of schools. There is a big need for technical and financial support, and this program provides both for schools large and small, urban and rural, public and private.

Miller has this to say about getting his start on the Keep Nebraska Beautiful Council in 2013,

A landfill client of mine got me involved with KNB through its annual golf event. As an environmental consultant to the solid waste sector, I was very impressed by and supportive of his and his company’s support of KNB and the Mission to ‘take actions to improve and beautify our communities’ to promote healthy environments to live, work, and play within.

Nebraska is making great strides toward cleaner, greener, and more beautiful places to live through Keep Nebraska Beautiful. The nonprofit coordinates events in the State of Nebraska, such as the Great American Cleanup, America Recycles Day, Recycle Bowl, and National Planting Day. This effective community partnership includes representation from the public, private, and civic sectors.

Over the years, local affiliates throughout the state have joined Keep Nebraska Beautiful as Keep America Beautiful affiliates. These include educational and community-improvement programs addressing local needs such as litter awareness, cleanups, beautification, reuse and recycling programs, and neighborhood revitalization.

Successful organizations like these are sustainable through the generous support of their members and supporters like Mike Miller and you. Join in, or see what’s happening in your community.

 

We’re proud of Mike and all the staff at SCS Engineers who serve our communities and clients.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SCS Webinar: Untangling the Proposed PFAS Regulations

July 11, 2022

proposed PFAS regulation impacts some landfill leachate and sludge

 

SCS Engineers is hosting a panel on proposed PFAS regulations as EPA continues to work on its goal of adding PFOA and PFOS as hazardous constituents under CERCLA – aka Superfund. EPA is also considering adding certain PFAS as hazardous constituents under Appendix VIII of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act or RCRA, giving EPA authority to require RCRA corrective action for PFAS at RCRA sites. With data for about 14 PFAS constituents, including some of the newer ones commonly known as GenX, and based on toxicity data, the EPA supports the development of standards for risk-based concentration levels and risk screening levels for ingesting PFAS.

In July’s client webinar, our panelists aim to bring clarity and advice to those operating landfills that may become subject to regulations. The free webinar features a panel of speakers clarifying the recent plans, headlines and health advisories surrounding PFAS, as well as sharing some promising leachate treatment options. SCS’s engineers, scientists and landfill operations experts will speak during the forum and answer your questions. They are also available for follow-up after the 2 p.m. July 21 webinar.

Landfill operators who manage waste streams, leachate and sludges possibly laden with PFAS can attend this event and learn about the latest regulatory changes and proposals surrounding PFAS.

 

Reserve your spot, or learn more about proposed PFAS regulations

Managing PFAS in Landfill Leachate and Sludge In a Changing Regulatory Climate.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Untangling the Proposed PFAS Regulations – SCS Webinar

July 6, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting
Landfill operators must contend with incoming PFAS-laden waste streams while managing leachate and sludges potentially contaminated with concentrated levels of PFAS.

 

Reprint from a Recycling Today article by Managing Editor Bob Gaetjens.

SCS Engineers to host panel on proposed PFAS regulations

As the EPA considers regulating PFAS, SCS Engineers helps bring clarity and advice to those operating landfills that may become subject to regulations.

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are under the sharp gaze of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which plans to determine how toxic the substance is.

There now is data for about 14 PFAS constituents, including some of the newer ones commonly known as GenX. Based on toxicity data, the EPA supports the development of standards for risk-based concentration levels and risk screening levels for ingesting PFAS. The state of Maine announced earlier this year a ban on PFAS in landfill leachate.

The EPA is considering whether to propose that perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanicsulfonic acid (PFOS) be classified as hazardous PFAS constituents under Appendix VIII of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), giving the federal agency the authority to require corrective action for PFAS and RCRA sites.

It is with this background that SCS Engineers is hosting a webinar featuring a panel of speakers clarifying the recent plans, headlines and health advisories surrounding PFAS, as well as sharing some promising leachate treatment options. SCS’s engineers, scientists and landfill operations experts will be featured during the forum and can be available for follow-up after the 2 p.m. July 21 webinar.

Landfill operators who manage waste streams, leachate and sludges possibly laden with PFAS can attend this event and learn about the latest regulatory changes and proposals surrounding PFAS.

Certificates of attendance are available for attendees who registered on Zoom and attended the live session.

 

Reserve your spot, or learn more about Managing PFAS in Landfill Leachate and Sludge In a Changing Regulatory Climate here.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SCS Engineers Welcomes Our 17 Interns!

July 5, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting

 

WELCOME TO OUR NEWEST SCS ENGINEERS STAFF!

 

Congratulations on joining SCS Engineers! You’ll work on projects alongside our employees and management in the next months. Jump in, ask questions, and take advantage of working with some of the finest environmental engineers, geologists, scientists, and consultants in the U.S.  You are now part of a national team solving some of the most challenging problems for our planet and our society. You’ve got the smarts and the desire, and we’re here to help build your skills.

Best wishes from your colleagues!

 

If you are interested in making a difference, find your fit here!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Using Technology for the Environment and Children Leaving Tracks

June 30, 2022

Children Leaving Tracks – Organization for Child Mobility

While performing methane reduction operations and monitoring at the Anchorage Regional Landfill in Alaska, members of the SCS RMC drone team met some pretty amazing people, including Shane Christiansen who works for the Municipality of Anchorage. The RMC team got to know Shane and learned how he and his business partner, Tim Harrington, are helping disabled children.

Shane and Tim run an organization called Children Leaving Tracks (CLT) that has the mission of providing mobile technologies to young people with limited mobility, allowing them to participate more fully in everyday activities with their peers. They believe that providing improved mobility can expand the physical and mental well-being of these kids and offer them greater freedom and quality of life.

Moved by Shane and Tim’s passion and dedication, SCS made a donation, which will provide “Electric All-Terrain Trikes” to three children! “Everyone deserves to have these experiences in life, but unfortunately this kind of technology is not always covered by insurance companies,” says Shane. “This means that some people go their entire life without getting to enjoy all that it has to offer. They don’t have the freedom to [move about] as they please.”

Although still in the early stages, Children Leaving Tracks seeks financial and in-kind donations from sponsors and networking partners. They are working toward creating a corporate/private collaboration that has the single mission of helping disabled children become more mobile for their health and personal growth.

CLT uses funding to run the organization to supply and finance Track Chairs and Electric Trikes. Donations cover the costs of purchasing and shipping these chairs to the kids who need them. Shane and Tim are registering Children Leaving Tracks as a 501c3 non-profit company; they are also starting a parent company aimed to be the primary funding arm that will supply a percentage of revenues from more recreational products it plans to develop.

The ultimate goal is to change the lives of hundreds of children by opening up their world through greater mobility and freedom. The organization helps youngsters gain confidence, better mental and physical health, and create greater opportunities to expand their individual talents. Kudos to Children Leaving Tracks!

Learn more about how this inspirational organization uses new technology to make life better; or to help, please contact Shane Christiansen at 1-907-529-5153.

If you would like to know more about using technology to improve the environment, ask SCS click here.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Applauding Commitment and Teamwork – SCS Veterans and Reserve Staff

June 27, 2022

SCS Engineers Environmental Consulting and Contracting
At SCS, we value the commitment and teamwork it takes to execute essential services.

 

Meet Major Carlos Restrepo, whose work exemplifies commitment and teamwork. Major Restrepo is a Project Manager in our Tampa, Florida office and the Detachment Officer-in-Charge of the Army’s 604th Forward Engineer Support Team – Advance (FEST-A). His team was deployed to Kuwait to support Operation Enduring Freedom (Spartan Shield and Inherent Resolve).

While deployed, Carlos managed a multidisciplinary team of professional and technical engineers in a high-paced contingency environment. He managed all aspects of command with special emphasis on engineering support capabilities. His responsibilities included project management, base camp and site development planning, engineer design, cost estimates, and required facility, infrastructure, and environmental assessments at bases and camps throughout Kuwait, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and Qatar.

Carlos’s team completed more than 50 missions with a project value of more than $15 million. Under his guidance and leadership, his team performed complex multidisciplinary engineer assessments and designs at all assigned locations. His ability to anticipate problems, provide sound recommendations, and collaborate with external organizations fostered positive relationships and extended the influence of FEST-A capabilities across the theater, which was critical to enhancing the Theater Engineer Brigade’s ability to deliver essential engineer solutions.

Despite numerous challenges presented by the ever-changing and dynamic operational environment, Carlos skillfully positioned the right personnel and resources to key locations at the right time to ensure the timely delivery of engineering design solutions to meet the various needs of all supported organizations across the theater without sacrificing quality or cost. His superb organizational management abilities were instrumental in streamlining numerous processes, making project execution more efficient for the supported organizations.

We are grateful to Major Restepro and his mighty team for their work. At SCS, we value the commitment and teamwork it takes to execute essential services. For a rewarding career, consider becoming an employee-owner at SCS Engineers.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 1:31 pm