Tag Archives: scs

NEWMOA Science of PFAS Conference

December 1, 2020

Meet SCS Professionals, including Christine Stokes – Project Manager in our Suffern, NY, office, at NEWMOA’s Science of PFAS Conference: Public Health & The Environment, at the Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center in Framingham, MA, December 1 and 2.

The conference will also feature poster sessions, exhibits, and plenty of networking opportunities.

The conference is hosted by the Northeast Waste Management Officials’ Association (NEWMOA), a non-profit, non-partisan interstate association composed of state environment agency programs that address pollution prevention, toxics use reduction, sustainability, materials management, hazardous waste, solid waste, emergency response, waste site cleanup, underground storage tanks, and related environmental challenges in the northeast states.

Click for more conference details and registration information

 

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am
Tag Archives: scs

Free SCS Webinar: Built to Last – Design, Build and Operate Landfills for Extreme Weather Resiliency

November 19, 2020

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration report that the U.S. has sustained a total cost exceeding $1.790 trillion from extreme weather and climate disasters since 1980. 2019 also marks the fifth consecutive year (2015-19) in which ten or more separate billion-dollar disaster events impacted the U.S.

Each U.S. region faces unique weather and climate events. Solid waste facilities and landfills are particularly vulnerable to extreme weather since these facilities are exposed 24/7 to the environment. Extreme weather can disrupt safe and cost-effective operations, increase maintenance needs, and may compromise landfill stability.

Rather than reacting to the costly aftermath of extreme weather, landfill owners, operators, and designers can adopt landfill operations and maintenance, fundamental design, construction, and closure measures that can help protect facilities from damage during their operational life and for decades after closure.

Register for SCS Engineers’ November webinar to learn how to increase your facility’s longevity and ability to survive extreme weather. This is a free, live webinar with Q&A – open to solid waste professionals. Then, followed by an on-demand recording in the SCS Knowledge Center, where SCS shares environmental educational videos.

The presentation and discussion focus on the considerations landfill engineers integrate when planning, including the landfill locations’ potential for wildfires or drought, intense rainfall and flooding, high temperature, strong wind, and landfalling storms such as hurricanes.

Assessing the potential impacts to operations are considered for long-term financial sustainability, including excessive runoff, soil erosion and sedimentation, slope instability, overflowing of ponds and drainage features, excessive leachate generation and side seeps, as well as disruptions to landfill gas collection and control systems, and excessive waste settlement.

Robert Gardner, Sr. VP & Natl Expert on Solid Waste Collection – Routing & Solid Waste Finance & Rate Studies                                  .
Robert Isenberg, Sr. VP, Natl Expert on Geotechnical – Landfill Design and CQA

Our panelists bring decades of expertise to the table, including landfill design and solid waste master planning. They will provide strategies and resources based on successful solutions that help support your facility as you prepare for, and likely will experience disruptions from severe weather. The second half of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange. This educational webinar and Q&A forum are free and open to all who want to:

  • Predict weather impacts on facilities and operations
  • Avoid costly repairs and environmental risks
  • Continue to provide services to customers
  • Remain responsive to constituents’ concerns
  • Share and learn ideas, strategies among peers without a sales pitch.

 

When: Thursday, November 19, 2020, 11:00 AM Eastern

Click to Register for our Free Webinar

 

Important security note about registration: After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information and your personal link to join the webinar. This link in your confirmation email will only work for you; it cannot be shared with others. If you’d like to suggest the webinar to your colleagues and other department heads, share this email or the registration URL above.

SCS Engineers respects your privacy and will not share or sell your information. You may cancel your reservation at any time.

We hope to see you soon.

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 11:00 am
Tag Archives: scs

Congratulations to Sandy Ripplinger, SCS Engineers’ New Director of Health and Safety

November 19, 2020

 

On Tuesday, November 10th, SCS Engineers announced the promotion of Sandra Ripplinger to Director of Health & Safety. Sandy will oversee all industrial health and safety guidance and training for the SCS employee-owners in her expanded role, reporting to the Board of Directors and Chief Financial Officer Curtis Jang.

Ms. Ripplinger is a Board Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) and Safety Professional (CSP) with three decades of experience providing occupational and environmental health and safety services. She is currently also a Project Director with SCS’s Environmental Health Services Practice in Henderson, Nevada.

Her experience includes providing industrial hygiene expertise for industrial facility health and safety audits, process safety management audits, training, environmental evaluations preventing worker exposure. “Sandy has done a great job strengthening our clients’ safety programs and evaluating the risks to prevent accidents,” said Curtis Jang. “She is a strong leader, and I’m confident she will guide our employees with ever-smarter Industrial Health and Safety (IHS) protocols.”

“I am looking forward to working with our team of business unit directors and IHS professionals, continuing to make improvements that benefit our staff and clients,” Ripplinger said. “Safety and industrial safety are an important part of people’s lives, and SCS is committed to continuing delivery of our services in line with legal compliance, industry guidelines, and our clients’ business needs.”

Sensational, Sandy! 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: scs

SCS Webinar: Design, Build and Operate Landfills for Extreme Weather Resiliency

November 17, 2020

Each U.S. region faces unique weather and climate events. Solid waste facilities and landfills are particularly vulnerable to extreme weather since these facilities are exposed 24/7 to the environment. Extreme weather can disrupt safe and cost-effective operations, increase maintenance needs, and may compromise landfill stability.

Register for SCS Engineers’ November webinar to learn how to increase your facility’s longevity and ability to survive extreme weather. This is a free, live webinar with Q&A – open to solid waste professionals.

Our panelists,  Robert Gardner and Bob Isenberg bring decades of expertise to the table, including landfill design and solid waste master planning. They will provide strategies and resources based on successful solutions that help support your facility as you prepare for, and likely will experience disruptions from severe weather. The second half of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange.

 

When: Thursday, November 19, 2020, 11:00 AM Eastern

Click to Register Here

 

This educational webinar will help you:

  • Predict the impact of extreme weather on facilities and operational costs
  • Avoid costly repairs and environmental risks with planning and preparation
  • Continue to provide services to customers
  • Remain responsive to constituents’ concerns
  • Share and learn ideas and strategies among their peers without a sales pitch.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: scs

SCS Advice from the Field: Long Term Performance of Landfill Final Covers

November 16, 2020

With the proper design and planning, partial final covers can provide multiple benefits and long-term performance from the active life and well beyond.

About the Author: Ali Khatami, Ph.D., P.E.

There are several hundreds of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills in the United States. Many of these landfills are anticipated to remain active for decades to come, and Federal and state rules require slopes reaching permitted final elevations to be closed within 180 days. This means partial closure of slopes is part of the operational requirements of MSW landfills.

Federal and State Rules

Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), enacted on October 21, 1976, requires the final cover of MSW landfills to include a barrier layer with hydraulic conductivity that is substantially equivalent to or less than the hydraulic conductivity of the bottom liner. State-level regulations developed following the enactment of the federal law also required similar standards for MSW landfills. Many states, pursuing the federal guidelines, require at a minimum, the bottom lining system of MSW landfills include at least one primary barrier layer consisting of Polyvinyl chloride (PVC), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE). Naturally, the final cover barrier layer should also be PVC, HDPE, LLDPE as well.

According to the Federal and state regulations, following the completion and closure of a MSW landfill, the facility owner maintains the landfill for a minimum of 30 years beyond the final closing date. Extension of the long-term care period beyond the 30-year post-closure period is a hot subject among solid waste professionals. Some states have already implemented matrices for such time extensions; it is anticipated that the remaining states will require similar extensions for MSW landfills over the next several years. Even if regulatory agencies approve completion of the post-closure period for a specific landfill, the landfill’s final cover system is expected to perform for many more years to come. Otherwise, environmental issues associated with a lack of performance may force the regulatory agency to spend money for repairs no longer available through a financial instrument.

Long-Term Performance Designs

For the past few decades, SCS has specifically designed and permitted final cover systems with special features to prolong the final cover system’s performance beyond the post-closure period of the landfill. The final cover system designs:

  • Maximize available airspace in the landfill,
  • Simplify waste placement in the vicinity of the exterior landfill slopes,
  • Simplify stormwater management components over landfill slopes,
  • Effectively collect and remove rainwater percolating through the final cover soils,
  • Collect lateral leachate seeps below the final cover barrier layer, and
  • Effectively encapsulate landfill gas at the landfill perimeter.

Less Maintenance

The first partial final cover with these features was constructed in 1998, and since then, many more partial closures with these types of features have been constructed. All partial closures are performing satisfactorily without failure. Regular maintenance of the final cover vegetation and occasional cleaning of drainage swales, which are common maintenance activities, have been the only measures taken by the operators of the facilities with these final cover systems.

The features incorporated into the final cover systems were:

  • Straight 3H:1V slopes to the top of the landfill with no benches or terraces, providing benefits such as maximizing airspace; eliminating complications during filling of the landfill near exterior slopes; allowing final surface water drainage swales to be constructed during the construction of the final cover which provides flexibility for the swale locations, swale slopes, drainage points of swales on the slopes; and downchute pipes that do not require complicated geometric features at the point of connection to drainage swales on the slope;
  • A leachate toe drain system (LTDS) collecting and disposing of leachate seeps below the final cover geomembrane reaching the bottom of the landfill slope; and
  • A rainwater toe drain system (RTDS) collecting and draining out of the final cover the rainwater that percolates through the final cover reaching the cover system geocomposite drainage layer.

The features above have financial, performance, and stability benefits for the facility for many years to come. So far, such final covers have been constructed on 3H:1V slopes as long as 550 ft. in length with no terraces. Several of the completed final covers were partial closures on a 3H:1V slope, where the next phase was constructed directly above a previous phase with the two phases tied together at the phase boundary.

Proper design and planning for the construction of partial final covers are significantly important for the long-term performance of landfills during the active life, post-closure period, and beyond.

 


 

Want more advice from our designers? Select articles and blogs for further reading:

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: scs

Wishing all Veterans a Safe and Happy Veteran’s Day

November 11, 2020

Meet Brian Eigenberger of our Charlotte, NC office. Brian is an Associate Scientist and an Air Force Veteran recently joining the SCS Engineers team in August! Brian’s love for the outdoors sparked his interest in geology and environmental services, leading to his Bachelor of Science in Geology from the University of North Carolina in May 2019.

Brian joined the United States Air Force in September 2010, working as a maintenance scheduler for 23 F-15 fighter jets. His responsibilities were to track jet maintenance, reporting his findings to the production superintendent managing the aircraft unit, then creating maintenance schedules for each aircraft while tracking its flying hours. The work requires meticulous record-keeping and knowledge of the aircraft itself.

Brian monitoring a landfill well. SCS designs landfills to prevent leachate contamination of groundwater or surface waters. Geologists monitor regularly to gather and verify accurate data while operating within a regulatory framework.

As an SCS Associate Scientist, using his USAF experience and degree, Brian now works in the office and the field. He observes landfill well installations, collects gas, soil, and liquid samples, and then prepares the scientific data findings for his clients. The information informs groundwater reports ensuring that water resources remain pristine and meet all local and federal compliance standards.

 

Brian enjoys working with his clients, traveling to meet with them, while working outdoors, especially relishing seasons’ change. 

 

Hired during the COVID-19 pandemic, Brian said he feels lucky to work in a professional capacity on a technical team but that many of his peers are having trouble finding specialized positions. Brian had never been on a landfill before SCS. He feels the learning and mentoring bring new and exciting perspectives to his career. He knows there is much more to learn, but he is excited to be part of SCS Engineers.

Brian enjoys spending time with his golden retriever, Axel. He adopted Axel before joining the Air Force, and both were overjoyed at their reunion when he turned home from his service. The two frequently go hiking; another way Brian enjoys good company and the great outdoors!

 

To Brian and all of our SCS Veterans – we are grateful for your service and dedication to our wellbeing. We are proud that your work as an SCS employee-owner continues to benefit our nation.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:02 am
Tag Archives: scs

Marion County Hires SCS Engineers for the Baseline Landfill Cell Closure

November 9, 2020

Marion County has awarded SCS the planning, designing, permitting, bid phase services, construction quality assurance (CQA) services, and construction contract management for the approximately 50-acre baseline landfill cell No. 3 closure. The County sought a firm specializing in solid waste, with landfill closure experience in Florida to provide the required design and permitting services, and with the in-house capability to conduct the construction quality assurance (CQA) services required during construction. The entire project is estimated to take three years to complete, with construction spanning multiple rainy seasons.

Weather-related issues during closure construction are one of the critical factors to address. An overly aggressive contractor could strip too large of an existing vegetative area, try to place too much protective cover material over the barrier layer system; either can potentially cause significant erosion during rain events.

The County’s concern about CQA is to prevent placing the protective cover material over the newly installed barrier layer system. Should an unqualified contractor replace the protective cover material on the barrier layer, it will increase construction time and increase the potential for damage to the system. This damage is often not found until the contractor has demobilized from the site, and the facility begins to conduct the required surface emissions monitoring. The resulting repairs to the barrier layer are often a cost the owner incurs, not the contractor.

Based on decades of experience designing, building, and operating landfills, the SCS CQA professionals prevent these types of construction mistakes. Working closely with contractors to ensure construction events are thought through to the operations phases while providing recommendations if the construction plan may encounter potential issues.

“Our entire team is excited to have the opportunity to continue serving Marion County, especially with a project of this magnitude and importance to Marion County,” said Shane Fischer, a vice president with the SCS team. “Our professionals are committed to delivering the highest quality engineering and construction services possible for the long-term success of the project.”


 

Additional information at:

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: scs

Built to Last: Design, Build and Operate Landfills for Extreme Weather Resiliency

November 5, 2020

Each U.S. region faces unique weather and climate events. Solid waste facilities and landfills are particularly vulnerable to extreme weather since these facilities are exposed 24/7 to the environment. Extreme weather can disrupt safe and cost-effective operations, increase maintenance needs, and may compromise landfill stability.

Register for SCS Engineers’ November webinar to learn how to increase your facility’s longevity and ability to survive extreme weather. This is a free, live webinar with Q&A – open to solid waste professionals.

Our panelists,  Robert Gardner and Bob Isenberg bring decades of expertise to the table, including landfill design and solid waste master planning. They will provide strategies and resources based on successful solutions that help support your facility as you prepare for, and likely will experience disruptions from severe weather. The second half of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange.

 

When: Thursday, November 19, 2020, 11:00 AM Eastern

Click to Register Here

 

This educational webinar will help you:

  • Predict the impact of extreme weather on facilities and operational costs
  • Avoid costly repairs and environmental risks with planning and preparation
  • Continue to provide services to customers
  • Remain responsive to constituents’ concerns
  • Share and learn ideas and strategies among their peers without a sales pitch.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: scs

Unperplexing PFAS and Liquids Management

November 2, 2020

Complementing the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council’sITRC, PFAS Technical and Regulatory Guidance, the website now has ITRC Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances – PFAS, and Risk Communication Fact Sheets available. The site and updated content replace older fact sheets with more detailed information and useful for those who wish to understand the discovery and manufacturing of PFAS, information about emerging health and environmental concerns, and PFAS releases to the environment with naming conventions and federal and state regulatory programs.

SCS Engineers’ professionals recommend further reading to understand specific chemicals or subgroups of chemicals under study to comprehend PFAA behavior in the environment. There are appropriate tools to develop a site-specific sampling and analysis program and considerations for site characterizations following a PFAS release.

We combine ITRC resources and our own to compile an updated library that we hope you find helpful. You can always contact one of our local Liquids Management or Landfill professionals too.

PFAS Behavior in the Environment

PFAS Concerns

PFAS Evaluations     

PFAS Remediation

 

The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC) is a state-led coalition working to reduce barriers to the use of innovative air, water, waste, and remediation environmental technologies and processes. ITRC documents and training can support quality regulatory decision making while protecting human health and the environment. ITRC has public and private sector members from all 50 states and the District of Columbia and is a program of the Environmental Research Institute of the States (ERIS), a 501(c)(3) organization incorporated in the District of Columbia and managed by the Environmental Council of the States (ECOS).

ITRC Goals

  • National paradigm shifts for using new technology
  • Harmonized approaches to using innovative technology across the nation
  • Increased regulatory consistency for similar cleanup problems in different states

SCS Engineers 

  • Reduce the review and permitting times for innovative and proven approaches to environmental prevention and mitigation programs
  • provides Prevention with Risk Management, Process Safety, and Spill Prevention Plans
  • Can help reduce the possible impact on environmental insurance
  • Faster cleanup with less environmental impacts
  • Decrease compliance costs
  • Provides technical and regulatory expertise for public outreach
  • Regularly engages with state and federal regulators and compliance enforcement as a trusted engineering firm.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: scs

Accounting For Emissions in Solid Waste Planning

October 29, 2020

 

Reducing Short-Lived Climate Pollutants

The International Solid Waste Association – ISWA, published a comprehensive report completed by SCS Engineers for ISWA under the Climate and Clean Air – CCAC, on reducing Short-Lived Climate Pollutants. A CCAC Solid Waste Emissions Estimation Tool – called SWEET, was used to investigate waste sector emissions of short-lived climate pollutants -termed SLCPs, and other greenhouse gases – GHGs.

Data was collected where multiple waste management scenarios in Tyre Caza, Lebanon. Publications on waste management in Lebanon, including an Integrated Waste Management Plan and Updated Master Plan for the closure and rehabilitation of uncontrolled dumpsites throughout Lebanon, provided data that were used in this study along with updated information provided by Lebanon’s Office of the Minister of State for Administrative Reform.

Different management options for reducing emissions of SLCPs over the short- and medium-term. Comparing emissions reductions achieved by implementing a range of programs over a meaningful time horizon provide greater clarity of vision to see which strategies produce the most climate benefits and are worth a high level of effort and the commitment of resources to achieve.

Solid Waste Emissions Estimation Tool

SWEET is designed to be used by solid waste planning professionals worldwide. It allows some degree of flexibility in selecting key inputs, which gives it greater control and ability to reflect local conditions but adds a level of complexity that may be difficult for some users to navigate. While offering users control of some model assumptions, SWEET includes many calculations and assumptions that are necessarily fixed and can produce unintended results given the model’s limitations. In addition, the assignment of input data that appropriately reflects actual and expected conditions can be challenging, especially when there is a large amount of information to be considered.

The reports on solid waste management in Lebanon and Tyre Caza following the waste management crisis provided multiple sources of data that required evaluation and processing before being used in SWEET.

Click here to read, share, and download the report, ESTIMATION OF WASTE SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS IN TYRE CAZA, LEBANON, USING THE SOLID WASTE EMISSIONS ESTIMATION TOOL (SWEET)

Training

ISWA and CCAC will be sponsoring a training workshop on the use of SWEET in the future. For advice and guidance using SWEET contact Alex Stege, SCS Engineers Senior Project Advisor, and Expert on Landfill Gas Modeling.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am