epa compliance

USEPA Effluent Guidelines Program Plan, Including PFAS Limits & Nutrient Study

February 2, 2023

EPA Effluent Guidelines Program Plan, Including PFAS Limits & Nutrient Study

USEPA recently issued Effluent Guidelines Program Plan 15, which includes a focus on PFAS discharges from multiple categories.  In conjunction with Plan 15, EPA has determined that revisions to the effluent guidelines and standards for the Landfills Category (40 CFR part 445) are warranted.  See Section 6.3.3 of the Plan.  Here are a few excerpts regarding landfill leachate:

  • EPA evaluated discharge data from over 200 landfills from across the country and found PFAS present in the leachate at over 95 percent of the landfills. PFAS detections included 63 different PFAS with average concentrations for an individual compound as high as 14,000 parts-per-trillion (ppt) (ERG, 2022c).
  • Based on information and data collected through the Landfill Leachate Detailed Study, the development of effluent guidelines and pretreatment standards for landfills that discharge their leachate is warranted. Therefore, EPA intends to revise the existing Landfills Point Source Category (40 CFR part 445) ELG to address PFAS discharge from these landfills pending resource availability. Once EPA develops the schedule for this rulemaking, it will be published in EPA’s Regulatory Agenda.

 

Additional details on the USEPA Effluent Guidelines Program Plan are available at https://www.epa.gov/eg/landfills-effluent-guidelines

 

Landfill leachate and wastewater treatment planning and resource information are available here.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Liquids Reporting Under EPA Subpart OOO Due June 21st

May 9, 2022

Important 2022 Regulatory Announcement from SCS Engineers

The deadline for Liquids Reporting Under EPA Subpart OOO is June 21, 2022. This EPA regulation is for sites that recirculate leachate and-or dispose liquid waste, as defined in the rule.

 

(l) Liquids addition. The owner or operator of a designated facility with a design capacity equal to or greater than 2.5 million megagrams and 2.5 million cubic meters that has employed leachate recirculation or added liquids based on a Research, Development, and Demonstration permit (issued through Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), subtitle D, part 258) within the last 10 years must submit to the Administrator, annually, following the procedure specified in paragraph (j)(2) of this section, the following information:

(1) Volume of leachate recirculated (gallons per year) and the reported basis of those estimates (records or engineering estimates).

(2) Total volume of all other liquids added (gallons per year) and the reported basis of those estimates (records or engineering estimates).

(3) Surface area (acres) over which the leachate is recirculated (or otherwise applied).

(4) Surface area (acres) over which any other liquids are applied.

(5) The total waste disposed (megagrams) in the areas with recirculated leachate and/or added liquids based on on-site records to the extent data are available, or engineering estimates and the reported basis of those estimates.

(6) The annual waste acceptance rates (megagrams per year) in the areas with recirculated leachate and/or added liquids, based on on-site records to the extent data are available, or engineering estimates.

(7) The initial report must contain items in paragraph (l)(1) through (6) of this section per year for the most recent 365 days as well as for each of the previous 10 years, to the extent historical data are available in on-site records, and the report must be submitted no later than June 21, 2022.

(8) Subsequent annual reports must contain items in paragraph (l)(1) through (6) of this section for the 365-day period following the 365-day period included in the previous annual report, and the report must be submitted no later than 365 days after the date the previous report was submitted.

(9) Landfills in the closed landfill subcategory are exempt from reporting requirements contained in paragraphs (l)(1) through (7) of this section.

(10) Landfills may cease annual reporting of items in paragraphs (l)(1) through (6) of this section once they have submitted the closure report in § 62.16724(f).

 

If you need assitance meeting the regulations, please contact your project manager or send a request to  

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Prepare Now for Changes Coming to Cal-EPA Supplemental Vapor Intrusion Guidance

February 8, 2022

 

Recent changes to regulatory guidance in California are arguably making obtaining closure on sites with vapor intrusion health risk concerns more difficult to achieve. The Draft Cal-EPA Supplemental Vapor Intrusion Guidance (DSVIG) suggests changes to the methods in which vapor phase transport and potential health risks are modeled and calculated for occupants of buildings with known soil or groundwater contamination beneath them. These changes, which result from a multi-year working group collaboration, recommend a more extensive and site-specific data collection effort. They include indoor air quality calculation methods relying on EPA work and guidance and empirically derived attenuation factors (AFs) which some would argue lead to overestimating potential health risks.

The consequences of the DSVIG are potentially significant if adopted as is and appear likely to result in more sites being “screened in” with vapor intrusion issues and more sites requiring mitigation. The impact, resultant costs, and possibly detrimental secondary effects include decreases in affordable housing production, particularly in urban infill areas. And while none would argue with appropriate protection of health risk, the question is whether the studies and empirical data used to support the DSVIG represents the best available science and is truly representative and predictive of risk.

The DSVIG adopts an attenuation rate of 0.03 for the flux of both soil and sub-slab vapor to indoor air based on a previous 2012 EPA Study comprised of empirical data collected from buildings arguably not representative of modern construction in California. The development of a reliable screening level attenuation factor for California based on high-quality, recent, California-specific data:

1) Will be protective of human health, as no toxicological imperative or basis supports a call for accelerated or immediate action (as evidenced by the fact that the DSVIG workgroup commenced its work in 2014 and issued the review draft in 2020).

2) Will ensure California’s environmental policy satisfies the gold standard for data quality and insightful analysis in which the state once took pride.

3) Will not unnecessarily decimate the California housing development market. The empirically derived screening level AF in the DSVIG is overly conservative based on the available data. More accurate empirical data and measurement methods for site-specific measurement are available.

Oversimplifying the VI health risk assessment methods has constrained the environmental community’s ability to apply science-based health risk screenings, often resulting in costs associated with additional environmental assessment and mitigation. An additional revision to the DSVIG to utilize a screening level AF more reflective of the current California data and building specifications could save state resources, increase infill development by reducing urban sprawl, promote housing development, all while protecting human health.

Take a deeper dive into this topic in the Daily Transcript article Vapor intrusion rules hamper infill projects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 5:58 am

EPA Alternative Test Method for NESHAP MSW Landfill CO Monitoring in Landfill Gas Wells Approved | SCS Engineers

September 15, 2021

 

Approved
The EPA issued a newly approved alternative test method (ALT-143) for compliance with the enhanced monitoring provisions in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) for MSW Landfills (40 CFR 63 Subpart AAAA updated March 26, 2020). The approved alternative method instead of Method 10 allows for direct monitoring of CO at a landfill gas well using a portable gas analyzer. The NESHAP requires weekly monitoring of CO at the landfill gas well if the gas temperature is over 145F and the regulatory agency has approved no higher operating value under the NSPS/EG rules or NESHAPs. The Solid Waste Working Group (SWWG) coordinated with landfill gas meter manufacturers (QED, Elkins Earthworks) to prepare this method.

EIL approved sharing a flow chart and Excel file that can be used for monitoring/documentation purposes when using this approved alternative “field instrument method.” Don’t hesitate to get in touch with your SCS air emissions/compliance expert or contact us at for details.

EPA will post the alternative test method to the Broadly Applicable Approved Alternative Test Methods | US EPA website page. Take note that the hyperlink in EPA’s letter is out of date.

Pending Approval
The Solid Waste Working Group (SWWG) also submitted two alternative methods in lieu of Method 10 to EPA for approval using grab sample (canister, foil bag) and laboratory analysis, one with GC/FID and the other GC/TCD instrumentation. The SWWG coordinated with several national laboratories on the methods. EPA is completing its review of the two proposed methods, anticipating EPA approval before September 27, 2021, the effective date of the enhanced monitoring provisions.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 4:53 pm

Summer of Compliance – Articles, Videos, and Expert Advice at Your Fingertips

July 26, 2021

 

The EPA  and, in some cases, states are rolling out new emissions guidelines at least as stringent. The EPA estimates that the plans could cover about 1,600 landfills. These landfills are in 41 states, tribal entities, and the U.S. territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

MSW landfills without Gas Collection and Control Systems (GCCS) that reach a specific threshold will need to add these systems and have 30 months to install or update control systems to meet new standards.  As you’ve noticed by now, we’ve greatly oversimplified what is happening.

The new regulations and timetables are difficult to understand and untangle. SCS Engineers, in concert with SCS Field Services, have prepared resources to help during the transition period and afterward when landfills are likely to need more monitoring and measurement, thus creating millions of more bits of data to store, analyze, and report.

We hope you find these resources useful. We will be publishing more soon.

These resources may help you with future monitoring and maintenance:

  • VideoUsing GIS Technology on Landfills for efficient monitoring, maintenance, and compliance.
  • Waste Today Article: Landfill Operators discuss using eTools, a web-based application platform for landfill gas data.
  • EM Magazine: Remote Monitoring and Control and SCADA on landfills

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

NESHAP and NSPS/EG Transition Resources On-Demand at SCS Engineers

July 16, 2021

OOO, AAAA, NSPS, EG, and NESHAP alphabet soup.

 

Thank you to the many folks attending SCS’s live webinar on July 15th about managing the NESHAP, NSPS/EG transition period. As promised, we’ve created a library of resources for you to use and share with your colleagues.

 

These resources may help you with future monitoring and maintenance:

  • Video: Using GIS Technology on Landfills for efficient monitoring, maintenance, and compliance.
  • Web page: SCSeTools is a web-based application platform that collects, monitors, views, charts, graphs, and manages data.
  • Find an Expert: Search feature on our website to find assistance with the service area Clean Air Act.

 

We’re here to help. Please find an expert or contact us at .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 4:33 pm

Two EPA Announcements – CWA Section 401 Certification Rule and the Risk Management Plan (RMP) Rule

June 1, 2021

epa rmp

 

May 27, 2021, from two separate U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announcements:

EPA intends to reconsider and revise the 2020 CWA Section 401 Certification Rule

Congress provided authority to states and Tribes under CWA Section 401 to protect the quality of their waters from adverse impacts resulting from federally licensed or permitted projects. Under Section 401, a federal agency may not issue a license or permit to conduct any activity that may result in any discharge into navigable waters unless the affected state or Tribe certifies that the discharge is in compliance with the Clean Water Act and state law, or waives certification.

EPA intends to reconsider and revise the 2020 CWA Section 401 Certification Rule to restore the balance of state, Tribal, and federal authorities while retaining elements that support efficient and effective implementation of Section 401. While EPA engages with stakeholders and develops a revised rule, the 2020 rule will remain in place. The agency will continue listening to states and Tribes about their concerns with implementing the 2020 rule to evaluate potential administrative approaches to help address these near-term challenges.

The agency’s process of reconsidering and revising the 2020 CWA Section 401 Certification Rule will provide an opportunity for public and stakeholder input to inform the development of a proposed regulation, and will include sustained dialogue with state and Tribal co-regulator partners and local governments around these issues. EPA will begin a stakeholder engagement process in June to hear perspectives on this topic and how to move forward. More information will be available at: www.epa.gov/cwa-401.

 

EPA, Region 7, public listening sessions on the RMP Rule

Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act Amendments requires EPA to publish regulations and guidance for chemical accident prevention at facilities that use certain hazardous substances. These regulations and guidance are in the Risk Management Plan (RMP) rule, which requires facilities using extremely hazardous substances to develop a Risk Management Plan that:

  • identifies the potential effects of a chemical accident,
  • identifies steps the facility is taking to prevent an accident, and
  • spells out emergency response procedures should an accident occur.

These plans provide information to local fire, police, and emergency response personnel to prepare for and respond to chemical emergencies in their community.

The Region 7 EPA announced two upcoming virtual public listening sessions on the Agency’s Risk Management Plan (RMP) rule. The RMP rule has been identified as an action for review under Executive Order 13990: Protecting Public Health and the Environment and Restoring Science To Tackle the Climate Crisis.

The listening sessions will give people the opportunity to present information, and provide comments or views pertaining to revisions made to the RMP rule since 2017. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will also participate in the listening sessions and receive comments on their Process Safety Management (PSM) standard, which contains similar requirements to the RMP rule.

Virtual public listening sessions will be held on:

  • June 16, 2021, from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET.
  • July 8, 2021, from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET.

For more information on the public listening sessions:

https://www.epa.gov/rmp/forms/virtual-public-listening-sessions-risk-management-program-rule.

Submit written comments via the docket at: http://www.regulations.gov,  Docket ID: EPA-HQ-OLEM-2021-0312 until July 15, 2021.

EPA Region 7 serves Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Nine Tribal Nations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 11:17 am

SCS Engineers Technical Bulletin Published – Federal Plan for Landfill EG Rule – May 24, 2021

May 24, 2021

SCS Engineers Technical Bulletins

 

SCS Engineers periodically prepares SCS Technical Bulletins – short, clear summaries of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and plans. On May 21, 2021, the EPA published a Federal Plan to implement the new Emission Guideline (EG) rule for municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The Federal Plan is published under Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 62, Subpart OOO.

Read, share, download the Federal Plan for Landfill EG Rule Tech Bulletin here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 5:22 pm

Regulatory Alert: MSW Landfills Federal Plan to Implement the Emission Guidelines (EG) and Compliance Times

May 14, 2021

SCS Engineers periodically prepares Technical Bulletins to highlight items of interest to our clients who have signed up to receive them. We also publish these on our website and social media accounts as well.

 

(40 CFR Part 60, Subpart OOO)

EPA is submitting a pre-publication copy of the final MSW Landfills Federal Plan to implement the Emission Guidelines (EG) and Compliance Times issued on May 10, 2021. The Final Plan becomes effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, impacting any remaining landfills without approved EG Cf rules.

EPA’s federal plan includes an inventory of designated facilities and an estimate of emissions from those designated facilities. The Agency estimates 1,590 landfills will potentially be covered in 42 states and the US territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and one tribal entity.

SCS Engineers is preparing a Technical Bulletin for distribution to our mailing list and on social media. The Bulletin will consolidate 133 pages into several pages highlighting significant dates and impacts for you.

 

EPA Actions: Final Federal Plan Requirements for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

 

Affected are MSW landfills that commenced construction on or before July 17, 2014, and have not been modified or reconstructed since July 17, 2014.

EPA is implementing emission guideline requirements for existing MSW landfills located in states and Indian country where state plans or tribal plans are not currently in effect because they were not submitted or approved.

 

The Final 2016 Emission Guidelines for MSW Landfills require existing landfills that reach a landfill gas emissions threshold of 34 metric tons of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC) or more per year to install a system to collect and control landfill gas (GCCS).

It also implements the emission limits, compliance schedules, testing, monitoring, reporting and recordkeeping requirements established in the Emission Guidelines for MSW Landfills.

Unless the landfill is a legacy controlled landfill, owners or operators of MSW landfills subject to the MSW Landfills Federal Plan must submit a design capacity report within 90 days after the effective date of the Federal plan (40 CFR 62.16724(a)).

Should the design capacity report indicate a capacity equal to or greater than 2.5 million Mg and 2.5 million m3 of solid waste a landfill can accept; then, an annual NMOC emission rate report must also be submitted within 90 days after the effective date of the Federal plan, and then every 12 months until the landfill installs a GCCS (40 CFR 62.16724(c)).

You may find a copy here on EPA’s website.

 

Contact your SCS project manager or for assistance. Follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook to receive EPA alerts and SCS Technical Bulletins, along with other news.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SCS Engineers Expands Environmental Services in the Midwest

May 12, 2021

 

SCS Engineers is expanding its environmental expertise hiring Richard Southorn, PE and PG, as Project Director in the firm’s St. Charles, Illinois office. Richard is a Professional Engineer in 13 states and a Professional Geologist in Illinois and Delaware. He will support SCS clients with their coal combustion residual (CCR) and municipal solid waste projects, including facilities for composting and the safe management of hazardous wastes.

Richard D. Southorn, PE, PG, SCS Engineers-Chicago

As a Project Director, he runs teams providing comprehensive services ranging from construction plan development to full-scale design services. His client responsibilities include the coordination and supervision of the project teams made up of professional engineers, geologists, technicians, planners, and support staff.

Richard has expertise in developing site layouts and analyzing designs for multiple landfill facilities.  These designs fit within the comprehensive environmental services landfill operators need to manage these complex, integrated systems. Richard’s design approach for landfill infrastructure integrates the elements that all play a role in environmental due diligence, including the landfill base and final cover liner systems, leachate extraction and cleanout systems, landfill gas control systems, and stormwater management controls.

As a licensed Professional Geologist, Southorn also oversees geotechnical stability evaluations, stormwater modeling, and the design and evaluation of landfill gas systems that minimize greenhouse gases. He has overseen many hydrogeological investigations that characterize subsurface stratigraphy, hydrology and hydrogeology, protecting groundwater for safer and more efficient facilities.

As with all SCS Engineers employee-owners, Richard engages in industry associations and his community. Learn about Richard Southorn and how SCSs’ work protects all citizens

About SCS Engineers

SCS Engineers’ environmental solutions and technology directly result from our experience and dedication to industries responsible for safeguarding the environment as they deliver services and products. For information about SCS, watch a documentary, or follow us on your favorite social media. You can reach us at .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am