landfill gas

SWANA SOAR Technical Conference, Kansas City

June 14, 2021

Join SWANA for SOAR, their new technical spring conference, Jun 14-17, 2021 at the Kansas City Convention Center.

SOAR stands for Sustainability, Operations, Action, Resources, and is convening to find technical solutions for resource management. For the first time, SOAR brings together professionals and experts from ALL disciplines of the resource management community, offering technical education, networking events, peer-to-peer learning, and actionable, fact-based solutions to advance the future of resource management.

Built on the essence of SWANApalooza, driving the power and connection of the entire solid waste community, SOAR pulls from the best of SWANA’s technical conferences and offers content tracks and symposia that will provide actionable solutions for your facilities. The conference is a must-attend event for professionals in:

  • Landfill Gas & Biogas
  • Landfill Management
  • Waste Conversion & Energy Recovery
  • Sustainable Materials Management

Click for details and registration information

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am

EPA Webinar: Landfill Surface Emissions Monitoring and Measurement Virtual Workshop

January 28, 2021

EPA will host two virtual half-day sessions on Tuesday, January 26, and Thursday, January 28, 2021, to explore recent air emissions measurement and monitoring developments from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills.

The sessions are designed to provide an opportunity to share and learn more about surface emissions monitoring and measuring technologies. This virtual workshop is open to the public, with the primary audience including MSW landfill owners/operators, federal and state regulatory agencies, and environmental consultants.

Register Here

If you have any questions, please contact Shannon Banner at or John Evans at .

Session II – Thursday January 28, 2021; 1:00 to 4:30 PM (EDT) 

The final rule applies to both major and area sources and contains the same requirements as the Emission Guidelines and New Source Performance Standards (EG/NSPS), promulgated in 1996. The final rule adds startup, shutdown, and malfunction (SSM) requirements, adds operating condition deviations for out-of-bounds monitoring parameters, requires timely control of bioreactor landfills, and changes the reporting frequency for one type of report.

The hazardous air pollutants (HAP) emitted by municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills include, but are not limited to, vinyl chloride, ethyl benzene, toluene, and benzene. Each of the HAP emitted from MSW landfills can cause adverse health effects provided sufficient exposure.

 

NSPS/NESHAP Compliance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 1:00 pm

EPA Webinar: Landfill Surface Emissions Monitoring and Measurement Virtual Workshop

January 26, 2021

EPA will host two virtual half-day sessions on Tuesday, January 26, and Thursday, January 28, 2021, to explore recent air emissions measurement and monitoring developments from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills.

The sessions are designed to provide an opportunity to share and learn more about surface emissions monitoring and measuring technologies. This virtual workshop is open to the public, with the primary audience including MSW landfill owners/operators, federal and state regulatory agencies, and environmental consultants.

Register Here

If you have any questions, please contact Shannon Banner at or John Evans at . Register once for both sessions.

Session I – Tuesday January 26, 2021; 1:00PM to 4:30 PM (EDT)

Session II – Thursday January 28, 2021; 1:00 to 4:30 PM (EDT) 

 

The final rule is applicable to both major and area sources and contains the same requirements as the Emission Guidelines and New Source Performance Standards (EG/NSPS), promulgated in 1996. The final rule adds startup, shutdown, and malfunction (SSM) requirements, adds operating condition deviations for out-of-bounds monitoring parameters, requires timely control of bioreactor landfills, and changes the reporting frequency for one type of report.

The hazardous air pollutants (HAP) emitted by municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills include, but are not limited to, vinyl chloride, ethyl benzene, toluene, and benzene. Each of the HAP emitted from MSW landfills can cause adverse health effects provided sufficient exposure.

 

NSPS/NESHAP Compliance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 1:00 pm

U.S. EPA Landfill Surface Emissions Monitoring and Measurement Virtual Workshop

January 11, 2021

SCS Engiineers provides regulatory updates for industrial clients

EPA is hosting a free workshop in January on landfill monitoring and emissions. The workshops are scheduled twice, over half-day sessions. These sessions will include presentations highlighting the latest technological developments for monitoring and measuring landfill gas emissions.

Dates and Times: Register once for both sessions.

  • Session I – Tuesday, January 26, 2021; 1:00PM to 4:30 PM (EDT)
    • 1:00 to 1:15 – Introduction Day One and Workshop Details
    • 1:15 to 1:45 – EPA Presentation – Current Landfill Monitoring and Measuring Regulatory Requirements
    • 1:45 to 2:30 – Bridger Photonics
    • 2:30 to 2:40 – BREAK / STRETCH
    • 2:40 to 3:25 – Sniffer Robotics
    • 3:25 to 4:10 – Elkin Earthworks
    • 4:10 to 4:30 – Q&A and Closing
  • Session II – Thursday, January 28, 2021; 1:00 to 4:30 PM (EDT) 
    • 1:00 to 1:10 – Introduction Day 2
    • 1:10 to 1:55 – Scientific Aviation
    • 1:55 to 2:40 –  GHGSat
    • 2:40 to 2:45 – BREAK/STRETCH
    • 2:45 to 3:30 – mAIRsure
    • 3:30 to 4:20 – LI-COR
    • 4:20 to 4:30 – Closing

 

Register Here

If you have any questions, please contact Shannon Banner at or John Evans at .

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SCS Advice from the Field: The Importance of Capturing Landfill Field Notes

October 8, 2020

its a beautiful thing turning methane into energy

The unsung hero at landfills with a landfill gas collection system is the humble Wellfield Technician. The position of Wellfield Technician is multifaceted; this individual needs to be well equipped to deal with constant changes. A good technician is capable of:

  • monitoring the wellfield,
  • interpreting the data,
  • making various valve adjustments,
  • troubleshooting irregularities,
  • performing preventative maintenance,
  • raising wells, pulling pumps, troubleshooting flare panels, and

All while communicating effectively with those on their team, during all kinds of weather and changing conditions.

One practice that most good Technicians embrace is keeping effective field notes. Those not engaging in this practice should consider doing so. Field notes and comments added to a row of monitoring data can be of great future value to the technician and the rest of the team. Accurate and detailed field notes contain information that can help the project team when it comes time to diagnose, repair, or troubleshoot various wellfield issues.

Whether it’s a handwritten entry in a logbook, a comment stored in a field instrument, or notes saved in a smartphone, tablet, or computer, the information recorded in field notes is indispensable for the proper, efficient maintenance of the wellfield.

Technicians are hard-pressed to recall every detail during the hectic daily push to get the wellfield read, while multitasking and keeping up with items that pop up at a moment’s notice. By keeping track of this information through note-taking or SCSeTools®, the technician can be more efficient over time  – they won’t be scratching their head, trying to remember a detail important to a task.

Examples of items we track in our database include: wellhead valve positions, surging in vacuum supply risers at wellheads, required maintenance of sample ports, flex hoses, audible wellhead leaks, ponding water around wells, surface cracks around a well, and borehole backfill material settlement.

Regardless of how recorded, save field notes as valuable points of reference.

Handwritten notes are entered into a preventative maintenance program or a wellfield database so that they are accessible for use in planning repairs or troubleshooting problems. Another option is to capture them automatically, even noting the GSI coordinates into a database such as SCSeTools, to save time and lessen transcription errors.

Once completing wellfield monitoring and tuning, technicians then use comments or notes as a punch-list to return to the wellfield − ready to perform maintenance or repairs. These are the actions that keep the landfill gas collection components operating efficiently, and clients’ happy.


 

About the Author: Ken Brynda is an SCS Field Services OM&M Compliance Manager in North Carolina. He is an active member of SWANA’s Landfill Gas and Biogas Technical Division, Field Practices Committee serving clients for over 30 years. Ken’s expertise includes the design, construction, operation and maintenance, evaluation, troubleshooting, and assessment of landfill gas collection and control systems and LFG-to-energy production facilities.

Learn more about Landfill Services here.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Elevated Temperature Conditions in Landfills: Sharing Innovative Designs and Strategies

July 20, 2020

The large majority of landfills in the country show no signs of special conditions indicating too much heat. Under certain conditions, elevated temperatures may occur inside a landfill, and the excess heat changes the character of chemical reactions taking place in the landfill, such as the decomposition process of the organic matter. Read and follow SCS Advice from the Field blogs for landfill best management practices.

 

SCS Advice from the Field

Landfill operators have known about elevated temperature conditions in landfills for nearly a decade. Some operators have already incurred numerous expenses to control adverse environmental and operational issues at these landfills, and some operators have set aside large amounts of money in their books to address future liabilities associated with such landfills. Due to the complexities of controlling elevated temperature conditions and the compliance issues arising from such conditions, it can force operators to temporarily, or permanently close their landfills.

Can design address elevated temperature conditions?

The operators of larger landfills have been monitoring and analyzing data to identify triggering factors, while others continue controlling the environmental impacts. Environmental Research & Education Foundation (EREF) initiated several research projects to identify the triggering factors with the excellent scientific work of highly qualified researchers. These are on-going projects.

In the meanwhile, operators of larger landfills are developing strategies, basing strategic-decisions on the data and conditions collected during operations over long periods. After analyses, they have the means to reduce the impacts by making changes in their operations and landfill designs. The most effective changes include eliminating certain waste types from the waste stream and improving the movement of liquid and gas through the waste column with new designs.

Are design innovations consistently implemented?

The pioneering designs feature preventative measures, intending to avert the formation of elevated temperature conditions in future disposal cells. Implementing these new design features requires careful consideration and functional analyses, as some of the recommendations can be costly, affecting the bottom line. The urgency in controlling compliance issues associated with elevated temperatures and the associated financial impacts of such conditions objectively prescribe that local managers work closely with their designers and field expertise to bring non-compliance issues under control.

Is this an executive risk management strategy?

Until the on-going research more clearly identifies the triggering factors and the means to prevent the development of elevated temperature conditions, it seems logical to invest in implementing preventative measures that are currently available. When more research results are accessible, then the local managers will be able to make decisions that are even more informed. Those wanting to address the likelihood of future liabilities proactively will need executive-level funding and superior technical support, all of which are possible.

Is there much sharing of newer designs and strategies within the solid waste industry?

Yes, there is a fair amount of collaboration among the technical community and within solid waste associations. Most operators share their preventative designs within the engineering community and help contribute to funded research. Their actions and results will help to strengthen an industry application until such time that research results and the means to prevent the development of elevated temperature conditions are well understood. We all know that progress in technology and science depends on sharing new knowledge.

Let’s continue with the combination of serious research, innovative designs, proactive operational changes, and sharing knowledge among our industry professionals that will lead to more precise solutions in the near future. Here are a few resources available now:

 


 

About the Author:  Ali Khatami, Ph.D., PE, LEP, CGC, is a Project Director and a Vice President of SCS Engineers. He is also our National Expert for Elevated Temperature Landfills, plus Landfill Design and Construction Quality Assurance. He has nearly 40 years of research and professional experience in mechanical, structural, and civil engineering.

Learn more at Elevated Temperature Landfills 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

New Source Review Preconstruction Permitting Regulations

April 9, 2020

EPA’s Interpretation of “Begin Actual Construction” Under the New Source Review Preconstruction Permitting Regulations

This EPA guidance addresses EPA’s interpretation of when an owner or operator must obtain an NSR permit for a major stationary source or major modification before the start of actual construction on the facility. Currently, EPA considers almost every physical on-site construction activity that is of a permanent nature to constitute the beginning of “actual construction,” even where that activity does not involve construction “on an emissions unit.”

The interpretation fails to give meaning to the distinction between an emissions unit and a major stationary source. As such, it tends to prevent source owners/operators from engaging in a wide range of preparatory activities they might otherwise desire to undertake before obtaining an NSR permit. For this reason, EPA is adopting a revised interpretation that is more consistent with the regulatory text.

The proposed revised interpretation will stipulate that a source owner or operator may, prior to obtaining an NSR permit, undertake physical on-site activities – including activities that may be costly, that may significantly alter the site, and/or are permanent in nature – provided that those activities do not constitute physical construction on an emissions unit.

Begin actual construction means, in general, initiation of physical on-site construction activities on an emissions unit, which are of a permanent nature. Such activities include, but are not limited to, installation of building supports and foundations, laying underground pipework and construction of permanent storage structures.

EPA does not find it plausible that NSR permit applicants undertaking significant on-site construction activities prior to permit issuance will allow them to gain leverage with respect to the outcome of the permitting process. Stationary source owners or operators cannot expect that any site activities prior to permitting will alter or influence the BACT analysis for an emissions unit or other elements of a permitting decision. Permit applicants that choose to undertake on-site construction activities in advance of permit issuance do so at their own risk.

EPA is providing an opportunity for interested stakeholders to review and comment on the draft guidance titled, Interpretation of “Begin Actual Construction” Under the New Source Review Preconstruction Permitting Regulations through May 11, 2020. For any questions concerning this memorandum, please contact Juan Santiago, Associate Division Director of the Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards at (919) 541-1084 or .

Read the draft guidance:  Interpretation of “Begin Actual Construction” Under the New Source Review Preconstruction Permitting Regulations

Submit comments using the form at https://www.epa.gov/nsr/forms/draft-guidance-interpretation-begin-actual-construction-under-new-source-review. EPA will consider the comments received and complete a revised version of the guidance.

More information at Clean Air Act Services  or  Oil & Gas Permitting

SCS Customer Support: 

800-767-4727

Local Offices  or  Find a Specialist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SCS Engineers Landfill and Solid Waste Seminar – Roanoke, VA

March 13, 2020

Join SCS Engineers for our 27th Annual Virginia Landfill & Solid Waste Seminar!

This half-day seminar will provide updates on the latest regulatory, policy, and technological developments in solid waste, landfill, and landfill gas industries. The $100 registration fee includes continental breakfast, seminar materials, lunch, and certificate of completion.

Participants described the seminars as “well organized and beneficial”; with “good coverage of the issues in the industry and real-world examples,” and “thought-provoking presentations.”

To register, download the Flyer and Registration Form.

AGENDA

  • Welcome and Introductions by Paul Mandeville, PE
  • Liquids Management: What Are Our Options? with Darrin Dillah, Ph.D., PE & Parita Shah
  • Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) 2020 Regulatory Update with Kathryn Perszyk, VDEQ
  • Best Available Control (BACT) for Landfill Gas Collection Systems: What Does This Look Like in 2020? with Alex Mandeville, EIT & Bob Dick, PE, BCEE
  • Efficiency Assessments for Landfill & Other Solid Waste Facility Operations with Daniel Jansen
  • Groundwater Sampling: Do You Know What’s Being Done at Your Site? by Jennifer Robb
  • How Recycling Programs Have Adapted and Improved in Response to Difficult Market Conditions with Stacey Demers, LEED AP

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
The seminar is intended for solid waste management professionals, landfill managers, waste/recycling managers, supervisors, and operators. For attendees already possessing landfill experience, topics will provide a fresh perspective and cover important regulatory and technological updates. For those new to the field, topics will cover essential information on all aspects of landfill development, operations, monitoring, and management.

CONTINUING EDUCATION
Full event attendance provides four (4) CPE/T contact hours toward DPOR requirements for Class I and Class II license renewal, as well as three (3) Continuing Education Units for the SWANA Certification Program.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am

SCS Engineers Landfill and Solid Waste Seminar – Richmond, VA

March 6, 2020

Join SCS Engineers for our 27th Annual Virginia Landfill & Solid Waste Seminar!

This half-day seminar will provide updates on the latest regulatory, policy, and technological developments in solid waste, landfill, and landfill gas industries. The $100 registration fee includes continental breakfast, seminar materials, lunch, and certificate of completion.

Participants described the seminars as “well organized and beneficial”; with “good coverage of the issues in the industry and real-world examples,” and “thought-provoking presentations.”

To register, download the Flyer and Registration Form.

AGENDA

  • Welcome and Introductions by Paul Mandeville, PE
  • Liquids Management: What Are Our Options? with Darrin Dillah, Ph.D., PE & Parita Shah
  • Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) 2020 Regulatory Update with Kathryn Perszyk, VDEQ
  • Best Available Control (BACT) for Landfill Gas Collection Systems: What Does This Look Like in 2020? with Alex Mandeville, EIT & Bob Dick, PE, BCEE
  • Efficiency Assessments for Landfill & Other Solid Waste Facility Operations with Daniel Jansen
  • Groundwater Sampling: Do You Know What’s Being Done at Your Site? by Jennifer Robb
  • How Recycling Programs Have Adapted and Improved in Response to Difficult Market Conditions with Stacey Demers, LEED AP

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
The seminar is intended for solid waste management professionals, landfill managers, waste/recycling managers, supervisors, and operators. For attendees already possessing landfill experience, topics will provide a fresh perspective and cover important regulatory and technological updates. For those new to the field, topics will cover essential information on all aspects of landfill development, operations, monitoring, and management.

CONTINUING EDUCATION
Full event attendance provides four (4) CPE/T contact hours toward DPOR requirements for Class I and Class II license renewal, as well as three (3) Continuing Education Units for the SWANA Certification Program.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am

Landfill Gas Header: Location and Benefits

January 13, 2020

SCS Advice From the Field Blog Series

 

Lessons learned from previously constructed gas collection and control systems teach solid waste professionals valuable lessons about designing for long-term survivability and reducing the maintenance cost of gas system components. The location impacts operating and maintenance costs for various components of gas collection and control systems such as condensate force main, condensate sumps,  force main for well liquids, air lines to pumps in gas wells, and gas headers long into the future. As often as possible, design the gas header in the landfill perimeter berm along with the condensate sumps. Landfill perimeter berms constructed in an engineered manner with well- compacted soils and a well-defined geometry provide a long-term cost-effective alternative to earlier designs outside the berm.

For many years, gas headers were designed and constructed outside of the landfill perimeter berm, on the landfill surface. Of course, landfill surface changes as waste elevation increases over time, resulting in many gas headers that now may be 30 feet or more below the current waste surface. Deeply buried gas headers are unreliable at best, and the operator loses access to them as soon as 20 feet of waste covers the header.

Collapsed gas headers buried deep in waste are an expensive challenge when operating a large number of gas wells connected to the gas header, and could cause serious compliance issues. Upon discovery of a collapsed buried gas header, installing a new header is a lengthy process with significant costs, not to mention the hurdles the operator will have to jump addressing noncompliance with their state agency.

The benefits of placing gas headers in the landfill perimeter are:

  • Constructing gas headers once without the need to be re-constructed again at a high cost
  • Constructing condensate sumps in line with the gas header in the landfill perimeter berm, provide technicians quick access for maintenance
  • Avoiding ground settlement around condensate sumps
  • Avoiding sagging of the gas header over time due to settlement
  • The slope of the gas header toward the condensate sumps in perimeter berms is much less than those on the landfill slope
  • There is little surcharge loading on the gas header, thereby no crushing of the pipe
  • The gas header is accessible for any additional connections if required in the future.

Since the condensate force main follows the gas header in the perimeter berm to flow to a tank or discharge point, there are additional maintenance benefits.

  • Electrical lines to electric pumps or compressed air lines to air pumps in condensate sumps are located in the landfill perimeter berm
  • Cleanouts to the condensate force main are built along the perimeter berm and accessible for maintenance
  • Flow meters, air release valves, and sampling points on the condensate force main are constructed at necessary spots along the landfill perimeter berm and easily accessible to technicians
  • Stub outs on the gas header are constructed at locations specified in the design plans along the landfill perimeter berm for connecting the gas header to vacuum lines extending up the landfill slope
  • Compressed air lines to air pumps in gas wells are constructed in the landfill perimeter berm with stub outs for extensions on to the landfill slopes and to the wells.

By continuing to design gas header construction on landfill slopes, all of the components end up on the landfill slope as well. You can imagine what type of complications the landfill operator will face since all of these components are in areas vulnerable to erosion, settlement, future filling or future construction. Additionally, any maintenance requiring digging and re-piping necessitates placing equipment on the landfill slope and disturbing the landfill slope surface for an extended period.

 

For more information about these benefits and more, please refer to the MSW Magazine article series Considerations for the Piping Network, the author, or contact SCS Engineers at .

 



About the Author:  Ali Khatami, Ph.D., PE, LEP, CGC, is a Project Director and a Vice President of SCS Engineers. He is also our National Expert for Landfill Design and Construction Quality Assurance. He has nearly 40 years of research and professional experience in mechanical, structural, and civil engineering.

Learn more at Landfill Engineering

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:03 am