landfill gas

SWANA Virtual Landfill Challenges Summit

June 17, 2021

The Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) is hosting a virtual Landfill Challenges Summit on Thursday, June 17.

This half-day, virtual event will bring together landfill, landfill gas, and biogas professionals from throughout the United States and Canada. Industry experts from the public and private sectors will discuss current and future challenges that are expected to impact landfill operations and landfill gas production, and what lessons can be applied as we move forward.

The virtual summit will be followed by an on-line networking event.

Visit the summit site for details and registration information

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 1:00 pm

SCS Webinar: Using GIS Technology on Landfills, Facilities, and Development Projects

June 10, 2021

Live Thursday, June 10 at 2:00 pm ET

GIS improves operational efficiency at waste facilities, landfills and helps keep development projects on schedule. GIS technology transforms volumes of collected data into maps and easy-to-understand dashboards – making staff assignments and decisions more precise and timely.

Our panelists use case studies to demonstrate how they use this proven technology in new ways to improve forensic, diagnostic, and planning activities. Join us to learn how your operation may also leverage GIS to address these challenges:

 

Landfills: Operators make diagnostic and forensic use of GIS to address maintenance tasks faster. We’ll cover modeling 3D wells and liquid level data, showing how GIS embedded dashboards and infographics pinpoint exactly where to assign staff. At the same time, supervisors monitor completed assignments seeing real-time results and what still needs attention.

Siting Facilities: Decision-makers use multi-criteria decision analysis incorporated into a geographic information system to account for relevant technical data, environmental, social, and economic factors during the site selection of a waste transfer station. The resulting maps and infographics are useful at public meetings too.

Property Development: Time is money on development projects. Environmental engineers use GIS to more accurately pinpoint potential contamination sources, conduct site assessments, strategize remediation solutions, and see sampling results weeks faster. Infographics and dashboards show if and exactly where to continue sampling without waiting weeks or months for reports.

 

Click to Register and Reserve Your Seat

You will receive a Zoom email with your link to attend. Do not share this link.

 

DATE: Thursday, June 10, 2021

TIME: 2 pm ET, 1 CT, Noon MT, 11 PT

 

Do You Need Help?

For help registering or questions about the topic, contact our host via email at . SCS records the webinar making it available on-demand in the SCS Knowledge Center, where we share environmental educational videos.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 2:00 pm

Regulatory Alert: MSW Landfills Federal Plan to Implement the Emission Guidelines (EG) and Compliance Times

May 14, 2021

SCS Engineers periodically prepares Technical Bulletins to highlight items of interest to our clients who have signed up to receive them. We also publish these on our website and social media accounts as well.

 

(40 CFR Part 60, Subpart OOO)

EPA is submitting a pre-publication copy of the final MSW Landfills Federal Plan to implement the Emission Guidelines (EG) and Compliance Times issued on May 10, 2021. The Final Plan becomes effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, impacting any remaining landfills without approved EG Cf rules.

EPA’s federal plan includes an inventory of designated facilities and an estimate of emissions from those designated facilities. The Agency estimates 1,590 landfills will potentially be covered in 42 states and the US territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and one tribal entity.

SCS Engineers is preparing a Technical Bulletin for distribution to our mailing list and on social media. The Bulletin will consolidate 133 pages into several pages highlighting significant dates and impacts for you.

 

EPA Actions: Final Federal Plan Requirements for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

 

Affected are MSW landfills that commenced construction on or before July 17, 2014, and have not been modified or reconstructed since July 17, 2014.

EPA is implementing emission guideline requirements for existing MSW landfills located in states and Indian country where state plans or tribal plans are not currently in effect because they were not submitted or approved.

 

The Final 2016 Emission Guidelines for MSW Landfills require existing landfills that reach a landfill gas emissions threshold of 34 metric tons of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC) or more per year to install a system to collect and control landfill gas (GCCS).

It also implements the emission limits, compliance schedules, testing, monitoring, reporting and recordkeeping requirements established in the Emission Guidelines for MSW Landfills.

Unless the landfill is a legacy controlled landfill, owners or operators of MSW landfills subject to the MSW Landfills Federal Plan must submit a design capacity report within 90 days after the effective date of the Federal plan (40 CFR 62.16724(a)).

Should the design capacity report indicate a capacity equal to or greater than 2.5 million Mg and 2.5 million m3 of solid waste a landfill can accept; then, an annual NMOC emission rate report must also be submitted within 90 days after the effective date of the Federal plan, and then every 12 months until the landfill installs a GCCS (40 CFR 62.16724(c)).

You may find a copy here on EPA’s website.

 

Contact your SCS project manager or for assistance. Follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook to receive EPA alerts and SCS Technical Bulletins, along with other news.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

SCS Webinar: Using Drones for Operational Efficiency at Landfills, on Pipelines and Infrastructure

March 23, 2021

 Free Webinar

Drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with sensors capture a multitude of readings in a single swoop, monitoring and observing locations difficult to access on foot or by vehicle. The combination of UAV-mounted technologies produces photogrammetric and aerial photographic imagery, offering the ability to take measurements from photographs. This technology enables large-scale assessments providing a comprehensive view of a landfill’s overall health.

Mitigation is faster using collected geotagged data, which enables identifying potential problematic areas such as leachate collection headers, landfill gas headers, flares, wellheads, tanks, pipelines, equipment, even buildings. You can zero in on hot spots, unidentified tanks, or terrain that could be causing runoff problems reducing the time normally spent to locate, diagnose, and mitigate.

The same technology also helps energy firms, contractors, and other businesses inspect and monitor long horizontal projects, such as power lines and pipelines, or tall vertical structures, such as bridges and high rises. Performing autonomous flights over time provides historical data assessment and visualization of work’s progress, location of workers and equipment, and assessing and documenting weather or other impacts.

SCS Engineers’ March webinar is now online! Learn more about drone-mounted technology and how to achieve the most benefit. This webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess technology’s potential for addressing operational issues now and in the future. This is a free, live webinar with Q&A – open to solid waste, landfill, landfill gas professionals, contractors, municipalities, and the energy sector.

 

 

 

Our panelists bring comprehensive expertise to the discussion, including solid waste expertise and landfill management; a licensed pilot − flying and assessing over 120 landfills, pipelines, and other infrastructure; Remote Monitoring and Control (RMC) systems including Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), air quality compliance and pollutant dispersion and air measurement programs. The team answers questions throughout the presentation, and the second portion of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 2:00 pm

Free Webinar – Using Drones for Operational Efficiency at Landfills, on Pipelines and Infrastructure

March 18, 2021

 

Today, UAVs come mounted with various software that detects gas leaks, captures and maps progress, detects corrosion, and has many other uses. Mitigation is faster using collected geotagged data, which enables identifying potential problem areas such as leachate collection headers, landfill gas headers, flares, wellheads, tanks, pipelines, equipment, even buildings. You can zero in on hot spots, unidentified tanks, or terrain that could be causing runoff problems reducing the time normally spent to locate, diagnose, and mitigate. We’ll focus on the technologies and uses that bring the most value and benefits with plenty of time for questions.

This educational and non-commercial webinar and Q&A forum are free and open to all who want to learn more about UAV use as a diagnostic and monitoring tool.

 

Using Drones for Operational Efficiency at Landfills, on Pipelines and Infrastructure

 

DATE: Tuesday, March 23, 2021

TIME: 2 p.m. ET, 1 CT, Noon MT, 11 PT

 

Click to Register

You will receive an email with your private link to attend. Do not share this link.

 

Our panelists bring comprehensive expertise to the discussion, including solid waste expertise and landfill management; a licensed pilot − flying and assessing over 120 landfills, pipelines, and other infrastructure; Remote Monitoring and Control (RMC) systems including Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), air quality compliance and pollutant dispersion and air measurement programs. The team answers questions throughout the presentation, and the second portion of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Kennamer Joins SCS Engineers, P.C. Environmental Team in North Carolina

March 17, 2021

environmental consulting

SCS Engineers, a top-tier ENR environmental consulting and construction firm, welcomes Professional Engineer Mary Kennamer to its environmental services team in Raleigh, N.C. As a Senior Project Professional, Mary is responsible for designing and engineering solutions to help landfills, manufacturers, and businesses comply with federal and state environmental regulations.

environmental consultants
Mary Kennamer, PE

As a chemical engineer, Mary’s background and degree are useful to help North Carolina landfill owners prepare to meet more stringent federal and local air regulations. She will advise on air compliance issues, air permitting, compliance reporting, and consulting for landfills and manufacturing.

“Mary’s previous consulting experience and work with the US EPA is a tremendous asset and value for our landfill and manufacturing clients,” states Kenton Yang, the Raleigh office’s project director. “We’re excited to add another bright star to the Raleigh office.”

In order to permit new or expanding plants and facilities, there are complex environmental policies to meet. As an environmental and chemical engineer, Mary researches, plans, and completes the technical work for air permitting and compliance, SPCC, and due diligence that keeps owners in compliance and projects moving forward.

About SCS Engineers

SCS Engineers’ environmental solutions and technology directly result from our experience and dedication to solid waste management and other industries responsible for safeguarding the environment. For more information about SCS, please visit our website at www.scsengineers.com/, contact , follow us on your preferred social media, or watch our 50th Anniversary video.

SCS Engineers – Raleigh specializes in permitting and meeting comprehensive clean air, water, and soil goals and provides a range of services such as PFAS treatment, solid waste master planning, landfill technology, risk management, groundwater monitoring, pre-closure and landfill closures, and Brownfields remediation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Free Webinar – Using Drones for Operational Efficiency at Landfills, on Pipelines and Infrastructure

March 12, 2021

Today, UAVs come mounted with various software that detects gas leaks, captures and maps progress, detects corrosion, and has many other uses. In our March 23 webinar, SCS Engineers discusses how the combination of technologies mounted on a drone produces photogrammetric and aerial photographic imagery offering facilities and businesses the ability to take measurements from photographs. We’ll focus on the technologies and uses that bring the most value and benefits.

This is a free, non-commercial, live webinar with Q&A – open to solid waste, landfill, landfill gas professionals, contractors, and the energy and real estate sectors.

 

Using Drones for Operational Efficiency at Landfills, on Pipelines and Infrastructure

 

DATE: Tuesday, March 23, 2021

TIME: 2 p.m. ET, 1 CT, Noon MT, 11 PT

 

Click to Register

You will receive an email with your private link to attend. Do not share this link.

The benefits of drones are:

  • Real-time and more accurate air samples help determine and measure methane or greenhouse gas emissions,
  • Digital surface modeling (DSM) depicts elevations of reflective surfaces, such as facilities, infrastructure, landfill, and vegetation,
  • High-quality orthomosaic maps, digital terrain models (DTM), and waste volumetrics provide valuable information for owners, managers, engineers, and operators,
  • Surveys and inspections are much faster than when using a land vehicle,
  • Labor costs are lower, especially when regular site inspections are required over large and hard to navigate areas,
  • Using drones instead of human labor is safer on dangerous or difficult to navigate sites.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Troubleshooting Landfill Gas Migration Faster

March 3, 2021

landfill gas migration
SCS keeps his eye on a landfill’s range map for under extraction and system pressure maps for undersized headers and laterals.

 

When Doug Doerr got a call from a Colorado-based landfill operator with a hot gas probe at his site’s boundary, Doerr’s day kicked into high gear. Chasing down gas migration problems is nothing new in an SCS client manager’s life, but that reality makes the job no less complex. And in this scenario, he was dealing with a site that he occasionally got called to visit, so to understand the problem fast, he needed the site’s historical data and the current information to fully picture what was happening.

Doerr started with basic landfill gas information from the client: the monitoring probe’s location and a drawing of the gas collection system to determine where the probe was in relation to the gas system. But as you know, that is one small slice of a king-sized pie.

“All the LFG data that I would typically wade through to identify the problem can be overwhelming, but I had a recourse enabling me to get up to speed quickly. It didn’t take long to assess the problem,” he says.  That recourse is a combination of quick teamwork from his peers nationwide and sophisticated technology developed by SCS practitioners for landfill owners and operators.

“I queried our in-house landfill gas technical group (engineers, geotechnical experts, and field personnel). And got over 25 responses within several hours with suggestions, one of which came from Ken Brynda in SCS Field Services, who leveraged DataServices to help me identify and narrow down the potential cause of the problem,” recalls Doerr.

DataServices, a module of the SCS eTools® digital platform, collects, stores, manages and analyzes large volumes of continuously accumulating landfill gas data for individual sites or multiple landfills. The module provides a quick method to view landfill gas scenarios.

The beauty of it is that it generates maps and charts to visualize every well and every probe. These system components are viewed in relation to one another and in relation to the perimeter, where the methane on that Colorado site flowed. Further, SCS Field Services’ landfill gas gurus, such as Ken Brynda, plug-in specific parameters that keep a close watch on any well or a group of wells.

“I logged into DataServices and pulled data from the five wells closest to the hot probe, which showed we had vacuum, flow, and gas quality, indicating the wells were pulling hard enough. I shared the results with our landfill gas technical group responders in a table and range map I’d created. And they started chiming in,” Brynda recalls.

As responders viewed initial results from their respective bases around the country, Brynda churned out more information in a few hours, running point charts to capture the balance gas, methane, flow, temperature, supply vacuum, and the vacuum applied to each well. He looked for trends that narrow down cause and point to solutions.

 

Eliminating the Possibilities – Rule Out Well System Malfunctions

“It can take days if we’d had to do it the old school way with spreadsheets laid out in a lot of rows. But we could identify the potential problem in a matter of hours, backed by a comprehensive evaluation for the landfill operator in eight hours,” Doerr says.

When Field Services staff work to solve a problem with a probe, they look for an outlier, something from a group of wells that’s not behaving like the other wells. In this case, Brynda determined that the wells near the hot probe were functioning properly. DataServices eliminated potential problems by slicing through and analyzing large chunks of data confirming the system was working efficiently.

Next, we observed that the wells are likely too far away to pull gas back from waste, adjacent to the probe in question, where there are no wells.

“DataServices helped rule out malfunctions, and that’s a big deal because if you can confirm the landfill system is working properly, you have narrowed your focus and can look toward other possibilities, ultimately leading to corrective options,” Doerr says. Brynda and Doerr suggested putting in temporary wells in that area to avoid odor migration and health and safety issues.

Doerr continues watching the situation and is prepared with a several-point action plan to mitigate exceedances and avoid falling out of compliance. “We continue watching the data to ensure the gas collection system continues to function well. Should there be issues again, we’re able to fully identify the gas migration pathways and anything in the system that looks out of the ordinary,” Doerr says.

If the client decides to add wells in time, data from the expanded infrastructure will be added to the app and monitored. “As the number of wells grows, DataServices grows with it, adding any, and as much, monitoring and collection data as the operator wants. DataServices will always be in the background to monitor, collect and analyze LFG data in real-time, whenever we need it,” he says. Being able to store, organize, dissect and analyze unlimited volumes of information from one location is powerful. And not just because it helps operators identify problems as they are happening, but because it and our teams can support them in looking for trends over time. Keeping an eye on the activities that keep the systems in balance is less costly.

For Doerr, who spends time in the field but longer hours with his clients, DataServices and the ability to interact quickly with experts like Brynda help SCS deliver more value to clients. “As much as I’d love to master DataServices, I need to focus all of my time on my clients’ business and goals; having support from Field Services and DataServices makes us all more efficient.”

 

Landfill Technologies and Comprehensive Expertise

SCS eTools® and SCS DataServices®, now with SCS MobileTools® for viewing data and charts anywhere; available to pull landfill data into DataServices for analyzing. You can customize and focus on exactly what you need fast. As Doug and Ken emphasize, it’s info that you likely already have, but may not be able to use quickly for troubleshooting.

SCS RMC®, remote monitoring and control of landfill equipment and systems.

Comprehensive Landfill Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

EPA Webinar: Landfill Surface Emissions Monitoring and Measurement Virtual Workshop

January 28, 2021

EPA will host two virtual half-day sessions on Tuesday, January 26, and Thursday, January 28, 2021, to explore recent air emissions measurement and monitoring developments from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills.

The sessions are designed to provide an opportunity to share and learn more about surface emissions monitoring and measuring technologies. This virtual workshop is open to the public, with the primary audience including MSW landfill owners/operators, federal and state regulatory agencies, and environmental consultants.

Register Here

If you have any questions, please contact Shannon Banner at or John Evans at .

Session II – Thursday January 28, 2021; 1:00 to 4:30 PM (EDT) 

The final rule applies to both major and area sources and contains the same requirements as the Emission Guidelines and New Source Performance Standards (EG/NSPS), promulgated in 1996. The final rule adds startup, shutdown, and malfunction (SSM) requirements, adds operating condition deviations for out-of-bounds monitoring parameters, requires timely control of bioreactor landfills, and changes the reporting frequency for one type of report.

The hazardous air pollutants (HAP) emitted by municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills include, but are not limited to, vinyl chloride, ethyl benzene, toluene, and benzene. Each of the HAP emitted from MSW landfills can cause adverse health effects provided sufficient exposure.

 

NSPS/NESHAP Compliance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 1:00 pm

EPA Webinar: Landfill Surface Emissions Monitoring and Measurement Virtual Workshop

January 26, 2021

EPA will host two virtual half-day sessions on Tuesday, January 26, and Thursday, January 28, 2021, to explore recent air emissions measurement and monitoring developments from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills.

The sessions are designed to provide an opportunity to share and learn more about surface emissions monitoring and measuring technologies. This virtual workshop is open to the public, with the primary audience including MSW landfill owners/operators, federal and state regulatory agencies, and environmental consultants.

Register Here

If you have any questions, please contact Shannon Banner at or John Evans at . Register once for both sessions.

Session I – Tuesday January 26, 2021; 1:00PM to 4:30 PM (EDT)

Session II – Thursday January 28, 2021; 1:00 to 4:30 PM (EDT) 

 

The final rule is applicable to both major and area sources and contains the same requirements as the Emission Guidelines and New Source Performance Standards (EG/NSPS), promulgated in 1996. The final rule adds startup, shutdown, and malfunction (SSM) requirements, adds operating condition deviations for out-of-bounds monitoring parameters, requires timely control of bioreactor landfills, and changes the reporting frequency for one type of report.

The hazardous air pollutants (HAP) emitted by municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills include, but are not limited to, vinyl chloride, ethyl benzene, toluene, and benzene. Each of the HAP emitted from MSW landfills can cause adverse health effects provided sufficient exposure.

 

NSPS/NESHAP Compliance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 1:00 pm