Tag Archives: landfill gas

SCS Engineers Landfill and Solid Waste Seminar – Roanoke, VA

March 13, 2020

Join SCS Engineers for our 27th Annual Virginia Landfill & Solid Waste Seminar!

This half-day seminar will provide updates on the latest regulatory, policy, and technological developments in solid waste, landfill, and landfill gas industries. The $100 registration fee includes continental breakfast, seminar materials, lunch, and certificate of completion.

Participants described the seminars as “well organized and beneficial”; with “good coverage of the issues in the industry and real-world examples,” and “thought-provoking presentations.”

To register, download the Flyer and Registration Form.

AGENDA

  • Welcome and Introductions by Paul Mandeville, PE
  • Liquids Management: What Are Our Options? with Darrin Dillah, Ph.D., PE & Parita Shah
  • Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) 2020 Regulatory Update with Kathryn Perszyk, VDEQ
  • Best Available Control (BACT) for Landfill Gas Collection Systems: What Does This Look Like in 2020? with Alex Mandeville, EIT & Bob Dick, PE, BCEE
  • Efficiency Assessments for Landfill & Other Solid Waste Facility Operations with Daniel Jansen
  • Groundwater Sampling: Do You Know What’s Being Done at Your Site? by Jennifer Robb
  • How Recycling Programs Have Adapted and Improved in Response to Difficult Market Conditions with Stacey Demers, LEED AP

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
The seminar is intended for solid waste management professionals, landfill managers, waste/recycling managers, supervisors, and operators. For attendees already possessing landfill experience, topics will provide a fresh perspective and cover important regulatory and technological updates. For those new to the field, topics will cover essential information on all aspects of landfill development, operations, monitoring, and management.

CONTINUING EDUCATION
Full event attendance provides four (4) CPE/T contact hours toward DPOR requirements for Class I and Class II license renewal, as well as three (3) Continuing Education Units for the SWANA Certification Program.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am
Tag Archives: landfill gas

SCS Engineers Landfill and Solid Waste Seminar – Richmond, VA

March 6, 2020

Join SCS Engineers for our 27th Annual Virginia Landfill & Solid Waste Seminar!

This half-day seminar will provide updates on the latest regulatory, policy, and technological developments in solid waste, landfill, and landfill gas industries. The $100 registration fee includes continental breakfast, seminar materials, lunch, and certificate of completion.

Participants described the seminars as “well organized and beneficial”; with “good coverage of the issues in the industry and real-world examples,” and “thought-provoking presentations.”

To register, download the Flyer and Registration Form.

AGENDA

  • Welcome and Introductions by Paul Mandeville, PE
  • Liquids Management: What Are Our Options? with Darrin Dillah, Ph.D., PE & Parita Shah
  • Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) 2020 Regulatory Update with Kathryn Perszyk, VDEQ
  • Best Available Control (BACT) for Landfill Gas Collection Systems: What Does This Look Like in 2020? with Alex Mandeville, EIT & Bob Dick, PE, BCEE
  • Efficiency Assessments for Landfill & Other Solid Waste Facility Operations with Daniel Jansen
  • Groundwater Sampling: Do You Know What’s Being Done at Your Site? by Jennifer Robb
  • How Recycling Programs Have Adapted and Improved in Response to Difficult Market Conditions with Stacey Demers, LEED AP

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
The seminar is intended for solid waste management professionals, landfill managers, waste/recycling managers, supervisors, and operators. For attendees already possessing landfill experience, topics will provide a fresh perspective and cover important regulatory and technological updates. For those new to the field, topics will cover essential information on all aspects of landfill development, operations, monitoring, and management.

CONTINUING EDUCATION
Full event attendance provides four (4) CPE/T contact hours toward DPOR requirements for Class I and Class II license renewal, as well as three (3) Continuing Education Units for the SWANA Certification Program.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am
Tag Archives: landfill gas

Landfill Gas Header: Location and Benefits

January 13, 2020

SCS Advice From the Field Blog Series

 

Lessons learned from previously constructed gas collection and control systems teach solid waste professionals valuable lessons about designing for long-term survivability and reducing the maintenance cost of gas system components. The location impacts operating and maintenance costs for various components of gas collection and control systems such as condensate force main, condensate sumps,  force main for well liquids, air lines to pumps in gas wells, and gas headers long into the future. As often as possible, design the gas header in the landfill perimeter berm along with the condensate sumps. Landfill perimeter berms constructed in an engineered manner with well- compacted soils and a well-defined geometry provide a long-term cost-effective alternative to earlier designs outside the berm.

For many years, gas headers were designed and constructed outside of the landfill perimeter berm, on the landfill surface. Of course, landfill surface changes as waste elevation increases over time, resulting in many gas headers that now may be 30 feet or more below the current waste surface. Deeply buried gas headers are unreliable at best, and the operator loses access to them as soon as 20 feet of waste covers the header.

Collapsed gas headers buried deep in waste are an expensive challenge when operating a large number of gas wells connected to the gas header, and could cause serious compliance issues. Upon discovery of a collapsed buried gas header, installing a new header is a lengthy process with significant costs, not to mention the hurdles the operator will have to jump addressing noncompliance with their state agency.

The benefits of placing gas headers in the landfill perimeter are:

  • Constructing gas headers once without the need to be re-constructed again at a high cost
  • Constructing condensate sumps in line with the gas header in the landfill perimeter berm, provide technicians quick access for maintenance
  • Avoiding ground settlement around condensate sumps
  • Avoiding sagging of the gas header over time due to settlement
  • The slope of the gas header toward the condensate sumps in perimeter berms is much less than those on the landfill slope
  • There is little surcharge loading on the gas header, thereby no crushing of the pipe
  • The gas header is accessible for any additional connections if required in the future.

Since the condensate force main follows the gas header in the perimeter berm to flow to a tank or discharge point, there are additional maintenance benefits.

  • Electrical lines to electric pumps or compressed air lines to air pumps in condensate sumps are located in the landfill perimeter berm
  • Cleanouts to the condensate force main are built along the perimeter berm and accessible for maintenance
  • Flow meters, air release valves, and sampling points on the condensate force main are constructed at necessary spots along the landfill perimeter berm and easily accessible to technicians
  • Stub outs on the gas header are constructed at locations specified in the design plans along the landfill perimeter berm for connecting the gas header to vacuum lines extending up the landfill slope
  • Compressed air lines to air pumps in gas wells are constructed in the landfill perimeter berm with stub outs for extensions on to the landfill slopes and to the wells.

By continuing to design gas header construction on landfill slopes, all of the components end up on the landfill slope as well. You can imagine what type of complications the landfill operator will face since all of these components are in areas vulnerable to erosion, settlement, future filling or future construction. Additionally, any maintenance requiring digging and re-piping necessitates placing equipment on the landfill slope and disturbing the landfill slope surface for an extended period.

 

For more information about these benefits and more, please refer to the MSW Magazine article series Considerations for the Piping Network, the author, or contact SCS Engineers at service@scsengineers.com.

 



About the Author:  Ali Khatami, Ph.D., PE, LEP, CGC, is a Project Director and a Vice President of SCS Engineers. He is also our National Expert for Landfill Design and Construction Quality Assurance. He has nearly 40 years of research and professional experience in mechanical, structural, and civil engineering.

Learn more at Landfill Engineering

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:03 am
Tag Archives: landfill gas

EPA Alert: Further Actions to Improve the NSR Permitting Program

December 18, 2019

REPRINT OF USEPA PRESS RELEASE

WASHINGTON (Dec. 3, 2019) — Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing several actions to clarify and improve New Source Review (NSR) permitting requirements. These Clean Air Act actions are part of a suite of measures EPA is taking to modernize and streamline the NSR process, without impeding the Agency’s ongoing efforts to maintain and enhance the nation’s air quality. These actions will improve regulatory certainty and remove unnecessary obstacles to projects aiming to improve the reliability, efficiency, and safety of facilities while maintaining air quality standards.

“NSR reforms are a key component of President Trump’s agenda to revitalize American manufacturing and grow our economy while continuing to protect and improve the environment,” said EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler. “NSR regularly discouraged companies from investing in and deploying the cleanest and most efficient technologies. Through the Trump Administration’s efforts, EPA is providing clarity to permitting requirements, improving the overall process, and incentivizing investments in the latest energy technologies.”

“For too long, New Source Review permitting requirements stifled job creation, hampered innovation and slowed the ability to modernize critical energy infrastructure. Worse, in previous administrations, the permits were weaponized, so liberal activists could delay key projects,” said U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe (OK). “New Source Review hasn’t been updated in over four decades—making it hard to integrate new technologies into our energy infrastructure. I’ve worked for years to modernize the review process, and applaud today’s action by President Trump and Administrator Wheeler to streamline the NSR permitting process.”

“One of my consistent frustrations with New Source Review is what seems to be a perverse incentive away from innovation. Thank you to Administrator Wheeler and the Trump Administration for recognizing this and finalizing these positive reforms,” said U.S. Senator Kevin Cramer (ND). “The EPA’s actions provide certainty while restoring the proper scope of the Clean Air Act.”

“I applaud the EPA for taking further steps to reform the New Source Review permitting program. NSR’s burdensome process can impede upgrades that would actually increase efficiency and improve air quality. The EPA is moving toward a better NSR program that streamlines the process without sacrificing environmental protections,” said U.S. Representative Morgan Griffith (VA-09). 

“I applaud Administrator Wheeler for implementing a strong regulatory reform agenda at the EPA. Today’s actions are a solid first step in the right direction to reform the NSR permitting program. I look forward to continue working with the Trump Administration to further reform NSR and allow America’s industry to make their units more reliable and efficient, while maintaining strong environmental standards,” said U.S. Representative Andy Biggs (AZ-05).

“President Donald Trump continues to deliver on his promise to cut burdensome regulations that strangle American manufacturing and energy development. These improvements to the New Source Review (NSR) permitting requirements will protect our air quality, while incentivizing businesses to grow and expand. I look forward to continuing to work with President Trump and Administrator Wheeler to cut needless regulations and create American jobs,” said U.S. Representative Alex X. Mooney (WV-02).

“This Administration is clearing the path for manufacturers to invest in more energy efficient technologies that conserve energy, reduce emissions, and keep U.S. manufacturers competitive,” said Portland Cement Association President and CEO Mike Ireland. “For energy-intensive industries like cement, strategic investment in energy efficiency and emissions reduction are key components of any long-term climate and sustainability strategy, and EPA’s New Source Review reforms announced today help unlock new opportunities for sustainable operation.”

Final Guidance: Revised Policy on Exclusions from “Ambient Air”

After considering public comments, EPA is issuing final guidance, identifying the sort of measures which EPA may take account of in determining whether a source owner or operator has precluded the general public from having access to its property. Where access is precluded, the portion of the atmosphere above that property is not considered “ambient air” for the purpose of conducting air quality analyses under the Clean Air Act. The guidance updates EPA’s policy to recognize that a variety of measures may be considered effective in keeping the public off a source owner/operator’s property. These measures, which account for advances in surveillance and monitoring, depend on site-specific circumstances and continue to include, but are now not solely limited to, fences or other physical barriers. State, local and tribal permitting authorities have the discretion to apply this guidance on a case-by-case basis. The regulatory definition of “ambient air,” as stated in 40 CFR § 50.1(e) to mean “that portion of the atmosphere, external to buildings, to which the general public has access,” remains unchanged.

Final Guidance: Interpreting “Adjacent” for New Source Review and Title V Source Determinations in All Industries other than Oil and Gas

EPA has also recently issued a final guidance that revises the agency’s interpretation of when multiple air pollution-emitting activities are located on sufficiently “adjacent” properties to one another that they should be considered a single source for the purposes of permitting. To determine what activities comprise a single source under the NSR and Title V air permitting programs, three factors must be satisfied: the activities must be under common control; they must be located on contiguous or adjacent properties; and they must fall under the same major group standard industrial classification (SIC) code. In this guidance, for all industries other than oil and natural gas production and processing for which there is a separate set of rules and to which this guidance does not apply, EPA adopts an interpretation of “adjacent” that is based on physical proximity only. The concept of “functional interrelatedness” would not be considered by EPA when determining whether activities are located on adjacent properties. This interpretation should help clarify and streamline the permitting process.

Additional NSR Proposals

EPA also recently issued a proposal to address minor errors that have accumulated over time in four NSR regulations. While these minor errors, such as outdated cross references and typographical errors, have not materially impeded the effective operation of the NSR program, EPA believes that it is important to remove such errors from the regulations in order to provide regulatory certainty and clarity. The proposed corrections are all considered to be non-substantive and are intended to provide clarity and precision to the NSR regulations without altering any NSR policy or changing the NSR program as a whole.

EPA is also proposing to remove from the NSR regulations various provisions, such as certain “grandfathering” provisions, that, with the passage of time, no longer serve any practical function or purpose. EPA will be taking comment on this proposal, which will be published in the Federal Register.

More information on these actions and other NSR improvements are available at: https://www.epa.gov/nsr

Coming Soon: Revisions to Petition Provisions of Title V Permitting Program

EPA is currently working to take final action on a 2016 proposal for revisions to the title V regulations. This proposal would streamline and clarify processes related to the submittal and review of title V petitions.

The proposed rule would bring more certainty for all stakeholders, including the sources required to obtain and maintain title V permits; more focused petitions; better title V permit records which are expected to result in fewer petitions; and reduced administrative burden in the EPA’s review of petitions in a tight timeframe.

Background

Congress established New Source Review as a preconstruction permitting program in the 1977 Clean Air Act Amendments. The program intended to ensure the maintenance of air quality standards around the country and that state of the art technology is installed at new plants or existing plants undergoing major modifications.

Under the NSR program, before constructing a new stationary emission source or major modification of an existing source, the source operator must determine whether the new source will emit or the project will increase air emissions above certain thresholds. If so, the operator may need to get a permit from a state government or EPA that may require installation of pollution control technology or other measures.

 

Contract your SCS project manager, or service@scsengineers.com  if you have questions about the impact of these recent actions.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:03 am
Tag Archives: landfill gas

Federal Judge Rules Against EPA on the Landfill EG Lawsuit

May 10, 2019

Before the Court: EPA admits that it has failed to meet its nondiscretionary obligations to implement the Landfill Emissions Guidelines, as compelled by the CAA. The only questions before the Court were whether the Plaintiffs have standing and, if so, how long to give EPA to comply with its overdue nondiscretionary duties under the Landfill Emissions Guidelines. The Plaintiffs are the States of Illinois, Maryland, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, California, Vermont, and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Ruling: Plaintiffs have standing, and the EPA must approve existing submitted plans by September 6 and issue the federal plan by November 6.

Impact on Landfill Owners/Operators: This will create some confusion, as landfills will be working on getting revised rules in place while at the same time start complying with the old EG rule. We are already doing that with XXX sites, but this ruling adds complexity. If EPA keeps to the schedule and we have final approved revised rules by March 2020, landfills won’t have to do as much under the old rules before new ones take effect.

Stay tuned.

Contact your SCS Project Manager for more information, email us at service@scsengineers.com, or follow SCS on your preferred social media.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: landfill gas

Landfill Gas Collection and Control Systems – GCCS Article Series in MSW Magazine

September 24, 2018

To generate a return on investment of site-specific GCCS, you need OMM staff who understand the strengths and weaknesses of your site. From that understanding, successful OMM teams and facility owners can design, perform, and fine-tune their program.

SCS’s BMP’s uses a “beyond the compliance OMM model” because the practice leads to strengthening relationships with regulatory agencies and LFG energy providers. Our clients expect to move toward a field optimization program when both OMM procedures and regulatory requirements are fine-tuned to work in concert. That investment pays dividends by increasing compliance and improving gas recovery. When developed OMM principles are defined clearly, and evolved along with GCCS design and construction, teams rise to the challenge, and the reward is a consistent track record of excellent GCCS operation.

Part 1 of the series discusses design considerations for landfill gas collection and control systems (GCCS); Part 2 takes into account construction quality assurance (CQA) measures during construction of GCCS; and Part 3 covers BMP’s for GCCS Operation, Monitoring, and Maintenance (OMM) in the September/October issue of MSW Magazine. The SCS Team covers:

  • Safety
  • Monitoring Plans
  • LFG Well Start-up
  • Wellfield Tuning and Maintenance
  • Compliance

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:05 am
Tag Archives: landfill gas

Region 2000 Services Authority Wins SWANA Regional Program Achievement Award for Landfill Operations

May 29, 2018

The 2018 Solid Waste Association of North America, Old Dominion Chapter award recognizes significant accomplishments in the solid waste industry.

The Region 2000 Services Authority (Authority), was awarded a SWANA program achievement award on May 9, 2018, for landfill operations at the Region 2000 Regional Landfill – Livestock Road Facility, in Campbell County, Virginia. Clarke W. Gibson, P.E., Director; Larry Hall, Operations Manager; and Robert Arthur, Environmental Compliance and Safety Manager head the Authority’s operations team.

SCS Engineers nominated the team for their achievements through the Authority’s Odor Management Program, which reflects the success of the Authority’s technical strategies as well as their collaboration with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) and proactive community outreach efforts.

Livestock Road became a regional landfill in 2012 when the Concord Turnpike Regional Landfill closed. Livestock Road began serving the citizens of the City of Lynchburg and the counties of Appomattox, Campbell, and Nelson with approximately 165,000 citizens living in these communities. More solid waste means more cell development, and more odors to control.

Odor management is a foremost challenge at any landfill, but particularly challenging as Livestock Road was receiving a significant increase in solid waste just as the surrounding area was developing a subdivision adjacent to the landfill. The Authority took action, and today has documented a 98 percent decrease in odor complaints as of March 2018. The results enhance the quality of life of the citizens residing in adjacent communities.

“Effective landfill odor control takes a multi-pronged and diligent approach, we wanted to implement the best management practices and the best technology to address landfill odors. As a result, we believe we have significantly improved the odor problem at our landfill and have greatly improved the quality of life for our neighbors,” stated Clarke Gibson, Director at Region 2000 Services Authority.

The comprehensive Odor Management Program was developed and implemented with the support of SCS Engineers, and is comprised of odor abatement, mitigation, and controls. Numerous elements including systems, investigations, monitoring/analyses, protocols, and practices are part of these three major elements commissioned on a voluntary basis.

“The Authority’s operations team demonstrates excellence in environmental stewardship and community relations through their program,” stated Robert Dick, Vice President, and the SCS Project Director.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:10 am
Tag Archives: landfill gas

25th Annual SCS Engineers Landfill and Solid Waste Seminar – Register Now

March 23, 2018

About the Seminar
The half-day landfill and solid waste seminar provides updates on the latest regulatory, policy, and technological developments in the solid waste, landfill and landfill gas industries.

Registration
A $100 registration fee includes continental breakfast, seminar materials, lunch, and certificate of completion. To register, please complete and return the registration form located on the SCS website for download. Additional instructions will follow with your confirmation.

Who Should Attend?
Solid waste management professionals, landfill managers, supervisors, and operators. For attendees already possessing landfill experience, topics will provide a fresh perspective and cover important regulatory and technological updates. For those new to the field, topics will cover essential information on all aspects of landfill development, operations, monitoring, and management.

Continuing Education Credits
Full event attendance provides four (4) CPE/T contact hours toward DPOR requirements
for Class I and Class II license renewal, as well as three (3) Continuing Education Units for SWANA Certification Program.

About SCS Engineers
Founded in 1970, SCS is an employee-owned environmental consulting firm specializing in solid waste management and environmental engineering services. SCS opened its Reston, VA office in 1971. Our other VA locations include: Richmond, Virginia Beach, and Winchester. Presently, we have over 800 employees throughout the United States.

Roanoke | April 5, 2018
Richmond | April 13, 2018
Seminar fee is $100. Complete a separate form for each registrant and kindly attach registrant’s business card.

Questions? Contact Heather Blake for answers.

Thanks for attending!

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: landfill gas

Where Do the New Landfill Air Regulations Stand?

March 19, 2018

A look at the confusion stemming from regulatory uncertainty of new rules limiting air emissions from municipal solid waste landfills by David Greene, P.E., SCS Engineers – Asheville, NC.

The landfill industry continues to work with EPA Administration to get a longer-term stay to work out needed NSPS/EG rule changes. At this time, industry representatives are hopeful both these related goals can be achieved.

While the new NSPS/EG rules became effective back in 2016, the concerns with the rules raised at the time still remain unresolved. Despite this, we can expect resolution though it may take some time to fix. The fog should be lifting, yielding changes that are expected to be more workable for both the landfill industry and state/local regulators. In the meantime, stay tuned and stay informed.

Read the full article with links to the NSPS/EG update in a recently published SCS Technical Bulletin.

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: landfill gas

NSPS/EG Rule Update – March 2018

March 6, 2018

SCS Engineers periodically prepares Technical Bulletins to highlight items of interest to our clients and friends who have signed up to receive them.  Our most recent SCS Bulletin summarizes the new rules which took effect on October 28, 2016, with compliance obligations under the NSPS Subpart XXX rule beginning November 28, 2016. Originally, states and local air jurisdictions were to submit their proposed EG rules by May 30, 2017; however, there have been some delays in this process, which we condense and detail in this Bulletin. SCS will continually update coverage of this Rule on our website.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 9:24 am
SCS Address

Corporate Headquarters

3900 Kilroy Airport Way Ste 100
Long Beach, CA 90806-6816

Telephone

1 (800) 767-4727
1 (562) 427-0805 | FAX
service@scsengineers.com

Required Posting