Tag Archives: redevelopment

Brownfields 2019 – Los Angeles

December 11, 2019

Several SCS Professionals will participate in the National Brownfields Training Conference in Los Angeles, California, in December, including Mike McLaughlin, SCS Senior Vice President of Environmental Services.

The theme of the conference, which will take place at the Los Angeles Convention Center, December 11-13, is “Sustainable Communities Start Here.”

The conference is co-sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the International City/County Management Association (ICMA).  Offered every two years, the conference is the largest gathering of stakeholders focused on cleaning up and reusing formerly utilized commercial and industrial properties.

The conference will include dozens of educational sessions that encourage conversation and participation from fellow attendees.  Topics include:

  • Track 1: Sustainability, Livability, Resiliency
  • Track 2: Financing Options, Real Estate, & Economic Development
  • Track 3: Smart Cities and Communities
  • Track 4: Community Engagement and Environmental Justice
  • Track 5: State, Tribal and Local Government Programs and Partnerships
  • Track 6: Liability and Enforcement
  • Track 7: Cleanup and Remediation Approaches
  • Track 8: Small Communities and Rural Places

What to Expect
The heart of Brownfields 2019 is a dynamic educational program of speakers, discussions, mobile workshops, films and other learning formats that are calibrated to provide you with case study examples, program updates, and useful strategies for meeting your brownfield challenges head on. Featuring dozens of educational sessions and mobile workshops including many showcasing the City of Angels and the redevelopment in the surrounding region, the exceptional training offered by the conference has something for both beginners and seasoned professionals. There will be over 100 educational sessions and numerous networking opportunities to discuss new practices, share success stories, and stimulate new ideas.

The conference features a vibrant exhibit hall and other activities catered towards companies conducting brownfields cleanup and redevelopment. The exhibit hall will feature upwards of 150 booths housing federal agencies, engineering firms, developers, environmental cleanup companies, legal and financial expertise, nonprofits, and other types of organizations.

Who Should Attend
If you are in the brownfields industry or are part of a locale with a brownfields site, and you are looking to revitalize your community, spur economic growth, restore the environment, and protect the public health, then don’t miss Brownfields 2019.  Individuals who may be interested include:

  • Local, state, and federal government leaders
  • Federal and state contractors
  • Real estate developers and investors
  • Financial and insurance providers and risk management practitioners
  • Economic development officials and community development organizations
  • Construction and building firms
  • Environmental and civil engineers, planners and public works officials
  • Information technology professionals
  • Academic institutions & students
  • Attorneys

Mark your calendars and be sure to register for an excellent three days of training, networking and business development!

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am
Tag Archives: redevelopment

How Future Use Guides Ash Pond Closure Strategies – WOCA 2019

April 18, 2019

World of Coal Ash in St. Louis, May –13-16, 2019 event details.

Even the simplest impoundment closures come with design challenges. It is a challenge to navigate project constraints, whether technical, regulatory, or financial, to design and implement an effective closure strategy. Cost often helps to determine the “balance” between project constraints when the future end use of a closed CCR surface impoundment or the property it occupies is undefined. When a post-closure end use is defined, finding balance among project constraints to best serve that future use provides rewarding challenges.

SCS Engineers has navigated this balancing act on impoundment closure projects during facility decommissioning. Through a presentation of case studies, you will learn how this team has approached ash pond closure planning and execution where the future use of the impoundment site ranged from undefined to the home of a new solar photovoltaic installation. Examples also include potential future industrial use or property sale.

Case studies will highlight how geotechnical, hydrological, regulatory, or simple physical constraints have influenced the design and implementation of CCR surface impoundment closures.

Speaker:

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: redevelopment

How Future Use Guides Ash Pond Closure Strategies at EUEC 2019

January 22, 2019

 

EUEC 2019

 

Even the simplest impoundment closures come with design challenges. It is a challenge to navigate project constraints, whether technical, regulatory, or financial, to design and implement an effective closure strategy. Cost often helps to determine the “balance” between project constraints when the future end use of a closed CCR surface impoundment or the property it occupies is undefined. When a post-closure end use is defined, finding balance among project constraints to best serve that future use provides rewarding challenges.

SCS Engineers has navigated this balancing act on impoundment closure projects during generating facility decommissioning. Through a presentation of case studies, you can learn how this team has approached ash pond closure planning and execution where the future use of the impoundment site ranged from undefined to the home of a new solar photovoltaic installation. Examples also include potential future industrial use or property sale.

Case studies will highlight how geotechnical, hydrological, regulatory, or simple physical constraints have influenced the design and implementation of CCR surface impoundment closures.

EUEC 2019 in San Diego, February 25-27, 2019.  Conference details here.

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 10:40 am
Tag Archives: redevelopment

How Future Use Guides Ash Pond Closure Strategies

December 19, 2018

Even the simplest impoundment closures come with design challenges. It is a challenge to navigate project constraints, whether technical, regulatory, or financial, to design and implement an effective closure strategy. Cost often helps to determine the “balance” between project constraints when the future end use of a closed CCR surface impoundment or the property it occupies is undefined. When a post-closure end use is defined, finding balance among project constraints to best serve that future use provides rewarding challenges.

SCS Engineers has navigated this balancing act on impoundment closure projects during generating facility decommissioning. Through a presentation of case studies, you can learn how this team has approached ash pond closure planning and execution where the future use of the impoundment site ranged from undefined to the home of a new solar photovoltaic installation. Examples also include potential future industrial use or property sale.

Case studies will highlight how geotechnical, hydrological, regulatory, or simple physical constraints have influenced the design and implementation of CCR surface impoundment closures.

EUEC 2019 in San Diego, February 25-27, 2019.  Conference details here.

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: redevelopment

Norfolk Riverfront Using Eco-Friendly Redevelopment and Restoration Techniques

July 10, 2017

Creosote is a toxic chemical that has been commonly used as a wood preservative for over 50 years. It acts as a pesticide, herbicide, and fungicide and has been used widely in both land and marine applications.

The Elizabeth riverfront at the Harbor Park project site. Piles are cut off providing shore support while creating a fish habitat.

Studies have indicated that pilings and other artificial structures provide possible environmental benefits, such as habitat for invertebrates, roosts for birds, and a spawning location for certain fish species (e.g., herring). However, far more studies have indicated potential harm from treated structures. It is documented that pilings will leach the most during the first two years after installation after which leaching declines significantly.

The Norfolk Riverfront area has been developed since at least 1887, and the use of treated pilings can be presumed. The majorities of the pilings are presumed to

have been installed over two years ago and are therefore beyond the 2-year timeframe for significant leaching. Pilings that are shown to be in good condition and with a viable use as part of the development effort can remain in place with little effect on the surrounding environment.

This paper discusses the City of Norfolk’s waterfront brownfield redevelopment and the importance of understanding and developing an approach for the managed disposal of creosote pilings. The guidance is based on strategies approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other noted expert sources such as waterfront municipalities, published white papers, and peer-reviewed publications.

Take me to the paper and information about the authors.

 

Keith Matteson of SCS is part of an exciting program capturing valuable data about spat distribution (baby oysters) throughout the Lynnhaven area.

Other environmental groups are hard at work in the region. Lynnhaven River NOW, is one organization working with residents, businesses, and community leaders who are restoring and protecting Virginia Beach waterways.

Learn more here: http://www.lynnhavenrivernow.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: redevelopment

Property with a Past? Historic fill on a property is no longer an impediment to development.

May 3, 2017

When tackling a real estate development project, discovering contaminated historic fill is an unwelcome surprise, but with the proper due diligence, you can avoid project delays and cost increases.

Cudahy redevelopment project transforms closed landfill into safe, useful real estate. Click to learn more.

Historic fill is common on properties that were once rural and have become prime redevelopment sites as communities expanded. The fill may include contaminated materials like foundry sand, ash, demo and construction debris, and even municipal waste. In the past, these materials were used to fill wetlands or change the grade of the property before initial development. Today regulations have evolved, and state agencies require property owners to manage these materials appropriately during redevelopment. Also, particular types of historic fill are often not robust enough to structurally support your new building.

The “Defense Area” was demolished and replaced with new high-efficiency single-family homes shown here. The award winning community is now called The Emerald Ridge Development. Click to learn more.

There are many different kinds of fill materials – each with different physical properties and different potential contaminants. Knowing what is on your property before you start designing the site layout, and certainly, before you start digging, will help you plan your project to save time and money, and to receive state agency approval.

Before You Buy

The more you know about the property and the earlier you know it, the better prepared you will be to make decisions about how best to protect yourself from potential environmental liabilities and prepare for the environmental and geotechnical issues that historic fill can cause. Since every property is unique, the first thing you need to do is gain a thorough understanding of the property’s history and past use. Invest in a comprehensive Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment (ESA). Consider it a starting point for clues about the possible types and amounts of historic fill which may be present on the property.

If the results of the Phase 1 ESA warrant it, conduct a Phase 2 ESA and geotechnical study to collect soil, fill, groundwater, and soil vapor samples. The Phase 2 ESA and geotechnical studies will help you understand if fill and contaminants are present and the best options for addressing them during the development planning stage.

Historic fill on a property is no longer the impediment to development that it once was. Take these steps to get ahead of potentially contaminated historic fill, and keep your project on time and budget.

You may be able to reduce or eliminate the need for costly landfill disposal by incorporating some of these concepts into your project:

  • Put surface parking lots or green spaces over areas with historic fill.
  • Move buildings with deep foundations or underground parking to areas of the property where the historic fill is not present.
  • Use dynamic compaction or Geopiers™ to stabilize the historic fill in place before constructing slab-on-grade buildings or parking lots above it.
  • Surgically remove minimal amounts of the historic fill and replace it with new compacted fill.
  • Use a deep foundation system such as piles or drilled piers to build over the historic fill without the need for excavation.
  • Install inexpensive sub-slab venting systems in the new buildings.

By testing early, performing a proper geotechnical evaluation, and incorporating design adaptations where needed, you can successfully develop projects with historic fill within your schedule and without breaking your budget.

SCS professionals are available to answer questions or concerns you may have pertaining to commercial, residential, or private development on brownfields – we provide remediation, brownfields, and  Environmental Due Diligence services nationwide. Contact service@scsengineers.com or one of our experts.

 

About the author: Ray Tierney

Ray Tierney, PG, is a Vice President of SCS Engineers and one of our National Experts on Sustainability. He has 30 years of experience in environmental and sustainability engineering and has helped a wide range of organizations control and reduce their legacy environmental impacts and liabilities, lower their costs, obtain grants and permits to expand, and implement cost-saving practices. Ray serves the Midwest region and projects throughout the U.S.

JohnTabella, PG, LEED AP®, is SCS Engineers’ National Expert for Environmental Due Diligence and for Federal Services. In this capacity, he oversees all aspects of environmental services opportunities and projects primarily throughout the eastern seaboard and supports on opportunities and projects throughout the U.S.

Floyd Cotter specializes in solid waste management projects. His project work involves all areas of solid waste management including planning, permitting, transportation, landfill design, construction, and monitoring. Floyd is also experienced in general civil engineering, construction oversight, environmental site assessments, closure and post-closure plans, and permit and contract document preparation. Floyd is located in the Central region.

Randy Bauer has nearly 3 decades of experience conducting environmental site assessments, subsurface investigations, groundwater monitoring programs, soil and groundwater remediation, and geotechnical investigations at industrial hazardous waste and solid waste facilities. Randy is available to answer questions on the western seaboard.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: redevelopment

SCS Engineers Wins 2016 EBJ Business Achievement Award

February 6, 2017

SCS’s environmental services supporting COMM22, a mixed-use, mixed-income redevelopment project in San Diego will be recognized at Environmental Industry Summit XV

EBJ Business Award – 2016 Project of Merit Comm22. Photo: Ted7 Photography.

When the Environmental Business Journal (EBJ) presents its 19th annual Business Achievement awards this March, SCS Engineers will receive an award of Project Merit: Redevelopment, for its investigation and design program for COMM22, a multi-family residential development by BRIDGE Housing.

COMM22 is a mixed-use, mixed-income, transit-oriented development built on a former bus maintenance facility. SCS addressed several issues including underground storage tanks and the testing of fill soils. The firm’s pre-construction characterization and three-dimensional data analysis resulted in time and budget savings.

“Our remediation effort on this property ensured that human health and the environment were protected as cost-effectively as possible,” said Dan Johnson, vice president of SCS. “Affordable housing is important to San Diego communities and we applaud the work of BRIDGE Housing and the collaboration it takes to create urban projects like this.”

BRIDGE Housing Corporation, a leading nonprofit developer of affordable housing, creates and manages a range of high-quality, affordable homes for working families and seniors. Since it was founded in 1983, BRIDGE has participated in the development of over 16,000 homes in California and the Pacific Northwest.

More award-winning redevelopment projects of interest:

Petco Park and East Redevelopment – San Diego

Emerald Ridge Homes – East Alton


NFL Stadium Site – Los Angeles

Reliance Steel and Aluminum

Commercial Real Estate Transactions blog

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 3:00 am
Tag Archives: redevelopment

SCS Engineers Expands Ecological Service Capabilities for the Protection of Sensitive Natural Resources

July 11, 2016

Sensitive natural resources include but are not limited to the following: Threatened and Endangered (T&E) species and their habitats, wildlife refuges, wetlands, and tribal burial grounds. These are areas where federal or states have identified protected resources. SCS Engineers has the expertise and credentials to perform surveys for clients with projects requiring the identification of these sensitive resources, along with the regulatory permitting with specialization in threatened and endangered species, wetlands, and critical habitats.

Katie pays close attention during the release of a Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus).
Katie pays close attention during the release of a Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus).

Development and construction often occur near or within areas identified as sensitive natural resources. Responsible developers identify sensitive resources near or within their proposed project area as part of their development plans because protecting our nation’s natural resources is important. The protection of sensitive natural resources is the basis of the Federal Endangered Species Act, Clean Water Act, and National Historical Preservation Act. Projects under consideration in sensitive areas require special permits; without which projects can be shut down causing costly contractor delays and schedule disruptions. Post-permitting and the associated fines can be severe, so even if you are not a conservationist, it makes good sense to complete the permitting process before breaking ground.

Up close and personal with the American Bury Beetle (Nicrophorus americanus).
Up close and personal with the American Bury Beetle (Nicrophorus americanus).

When considering a project in potentially sensitive ecological areas, SCS Engineers recommends a constraint analysis be performed. The analysis will determine if the proposed project location is within wetlands, critical habitat, threatened and endangered species range, and other potential constraints. If it is, SCS recommends that a site assessment is performed and initiate agency consultation to protect the sensitive resources.

Both the permitting process and the preliminary ecological assessments are not difficult but do require credentialed specialists. SCS has geologists, hydrologist, hydro-geologists, and environmental compliance professionals nationwide. SCS Engineers even has credentialed biologists for specialized threatened and endangered species monitoring and assessments for several species that include but not limited to the American Bury Beetle, Arkansas Shiner, Arkansas Darter, Topeka Shiner, Neosho Mucket Mussel, Rabbitfoot Mussel, Northern Longear Bat, and Indiana Bat in the Central U.S.

To determine if a project is within a sensitive natural resource area or to schedule an ecological consultation, contact services@scsengineers.com.

About the Author: Vaughn Weaver

Vaughn_Weaver_SCS_Engineers-smVaughn Weaver has over 20 years of environmental services experience with a strong background in water quality and bio-monitoring and is currently a senior field technician at SCS in our Wichita office. He provides project assistance to a diverse team of environmental professionals made up of geologists, hydrogeologists, engineers, chemists, and biologists. His responsibilities include surveying project sites, mitigation monitoring, well sampling and monitoring, and report writing for clients.

In addition, he has 15 years of water quality experience with National Pollution Discharge and Emissions Systems (NPDES) for point source and non-point source permits. Vaughn is also a Certified Wetland Delineator – USACOE.

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: redevelopment

RISE Community Development Wins the 2016 Yvetter H. Younge Award

May 18, 2016

East Alton Defense Area Rehabilitation Project Receives Illinois Governor’s Affordable Housing Champion Award. SCS Engineers provides environmental services that help move redevelopment project forward. – Congratulations RISE!

RISE-St_Louis_logo

Mark Stroker, Director of Real Estate Development, RISE St. Louis, informed the SCS Engineers team about the honor, saying he felt “a great deal of pride and appreciation that Emerald Ridge was selected by IHDA [Illinois Housing Development Authority] as the Champion’s Award winner for excellence in affordable housing development for 2016.”

Mr. Stroker went on to tell the SCS team that, “It is an extraordinary honor and represents a long and collaborative effort… This was a tough project and wouldn’t have been possible without all of your help.” He attended the Illinois Governor’s Conference in late March 2016, where he accepted the award and discussed the project with conference attendees.

In his notification to Mr. Stroker about the award, Benjamin Fenton, IHDA’s Housing Coordination Services Manager, explained that three nominees are chosen for this award every year for distinguished developments, initiatives, or programs in affordable housing. The nominees stand out for their commitment to serving the Annual Comprehensive Housing Plan focus areas and one or more of the State’s Priority Populations, and for having positive impacts on the community in which they are located.

The "Defense Area" shown here was built in the early 1940's.
The “Defense Area” shown here was built in the early 1940’s.

Before it was redeveloped, The Emerald Ridge Development was known as the “Defense Area,” and it consisted of 18 one- and two-story multi-family buildings containing approximately 80 apartments. The Defense Area was built by the Federal government as temporary housing in the early 1940’s to accommodate workers at the nearby Olin ammunition plant during the war effort. After the war, these barracks-style buildings were not dismantled as originally planned but were sold off to private owners. Over the years, they were re-sold multiple times, and the condition of most of the buildings became more and more deteriorated, in addition to being constructed with asbestos-containing materials and lead-based paints.
Residents were temporarily relocated, and the old buildings were demolished and replaced with 46 newly constructed, high-efficiency single-family homes. The residents who lived in the area when the redevelopment project commenced were given the opportunity to rent homes in the new development, and some accepted. The rechristened Emerald Ridge Development is located in the Village of East Alton, Illinois, and the new single-family homes are affordable to families earning 60% of the Area Median Income, which includes nearly two-thirds of the residents of East Alton.

The "Defense Area" was demolished and replaced with new high-efficiency single-family homes shown here. The community is now called The Emerald Ridge Development.
The “Defense Area” was demolished and replaced with new high-efficiency single-family homes shown here. The community is now called The Emerald Ridge Development.

Services that SCS Engineers provided at the site included lead and asbestos abatement sampling and specifications, asbestos abatement management, subsurface investigation for a Phase II ESA, NESHAP demolition inspections, and two Phase I ESAs to assess the property for potential environmental impairments, to satisfy IHDA requirements, and to satisfy the CERCLA requirements to qualify for landowner liability protection.

Stephanie Hill, SCS Project Director, said: “I am honored to be part of the RISE team that brought so much value to the community.” Ms. Hill offered special thanks to Randy Homburg, SCS Geologist and Project Manager, for his work on this redevelopment project, and to the other SCS team members who performed the environmental site assessments.

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
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