Tag Archives: food recovery

WasteExpo 2019 – Las Vegas

May 6, 2019

Meet SCS Professionals and visit us at Booth 311, get inspired, and find the answers to your waste & recycling challenges at WasteExpo, May 6-9, at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Enjoy an interactive conference program.  With technology and innovation as the underlying themes, expect a conference program that dives deep into recycling/landfill, fleet management/collection, organics, safety, food recovery, and more! The WasteExpo Conference Program, in partnership with the National Waste & Recycling Association (NWRA) and Dr. Stu Buckner, is designed to sharpen your skills to help you run your business or department smarter, safer, and more streamlined.

Monday, May 6, Highlights!

Composting, Organics Recycling, Biogas Track
10:45 am – 12:15 pm
Composting Infrastructure Development, Public-Private Partnerships, Air Permitting Requirements, Technology Innovations

Featuring Patrick Sullivan‘s discussion Survey of Air Permitting Requirements for Composting Facilities Across the U.S.; tools for composting partnerships;  managing high solids digestate; the financial and operational benefits of pilot scale recycling projects.

 

Processing & Disposal Track
3:15 pm – 4:30 pm
Swiping Right: Which Leachate Management Solution Best Suits Me?

Join this panel of experts comprised of leading experts from SCS Engineers, Waste Management, John Zink, WEHRLE, and landfill operators for an all-inclusive review of present designs, operational practices, and technologies considered as part of a sustainable long-term solution for leachate management. Expect to learn the leachate management solutions that best suit your own operations and facilities. Learn about best practices, holistic approaches to leachate and liquids management using flow rate and leachate chemistry, membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology, leachate evaporation, and deep well injection. Plus what to watch out for in 2019 and beyond.

 

Tuesday, May 7, Highlights!

Composting, Organics Recycling, Biogas Track
9:00 am – 10:15 am
Composting: Increasing Processing Capacity, Improving Process Management, Minimizing Contamination

Join Tracie Onstad Bills for her presentation Methods to Achieve .5% Contamination in Organics; along with improvements to maximize processing capabilities; and a look at high-tech composting.

 

Food Recovery Forum Track
4:30 pm – 5:45 pm
Source Separation and Collection in Commercial and Municipal Programs: BMP’s, Data Collection and Evaluation, Lessons Learned, Case Studies

In this lively session, Lisa Coelho presents Split-Cart Food Scraps Recycling; plus how to achieve continuous program improvements; capture more and reduce contamination at the source; followed by BMPs for collection from customers.

 

Wednesday, May 8, Highlights!

Processing & Disposal Track
10:30 am – 11:45 am
Data, Drones & Case Studies: The Latest Trends in Landfill Management

This fast-paced session addresses the latest tools and trends being used in landfill management and focuses on four different case studies including SCS Engineer’s SCS Remote Monitoring and Control® – SCS RMC® system for landfill systems including flares, landfill gas, and leachate systems to identify, troubleshoot, and solve real problems effectively and efficiently.  The session continues with how the World Bank recently utilized drone technology for the St. Maarten landfill; the City of Barrie’s municipal solid waste landfill reclamation and remediation; and EREF results from the first comprehensive analysis of leachate quantity and quality and management practices across the U.S.

 

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 12:00 am
Tag Archives: food recovery

Estimating Quantities and Types of Food Waste

December 28, 2018

NRDC’s Estimating Quantities and Types of Food Waste is a study and report based on studies performed in the cities of Denver, Nashville, and New York. The main objectives were to assess the amount of food wasted across the residential, industrial, commercial and institutional sectors; to determine why the food was wasted, and to assess the amount of edible food that could have potentially been donated to those populations in need.

Many cities are collecting data and performing waste characterizations to begin reducing the amount of food wasted and finding inedible food that can be composted or used in industries. Estimating a baseline of the amounts currently being discarded is a critical first step in the process. Without understanding basic information about how much food is being wasted and where that waste occurs, assessing progress and developing plans becomes overly challenging.

The report shows us what percentage of foods are inedible and edible, along with the most common foods wasted by residents (coffee, apples, bread, and milk). At the household level, total food wasted was 8.7 pounds per household week, and edible food wasted was 6.0 pounds per household per week. Smaller households have a larger percentage of wasted food too. Not surprising is that awareness of food waste can save consumers money, energy, and time.

Ideally, plans follow the EPA Food Recovery Hierarchy in prioritizing prevention and rescue over other strategies. Developing detailed assessments can provide insight on food wasted by sector, by discard destination, by loss reason, and by food type, including breakdowns of edible, avoidable, and foods that can be rescued. Plans and studies provide additional data that can help in structuring effective interventions to reduce wasted food.

Similarly, few cities have tried to estimate how much surplus food beyond what is currently being donated could potentially be rescued and directed to people in need. Data on these unexploited resources clarifies the scale and sources of rescuable food and, along with information on what types of surplus food are currently needed in the community, can inform strategies for increasing participation in food donation efforts and bolstering food rescue infrastructure. It also highlights what portion of the city’s “meals gap” could potentially be addressed through increased food donation from pre-consumer surplus. See NRDC’s report Modeling the Potential to Increase Food Rescue: Denver, New York City and Nashville for more information on conducting a food rescue assessment.

Donation programs for institutions can be found online. Food Donation Collection is one. Finding a program to take residential pre-consumer surplus are usually limited to non-perishables which is why your city or community is supporting organized local programs such as Arlington Food Assistance Centers.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
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