composting

Compost2022 – USCC Conference and Tradeshow

January 24, 2022

We hope you can join SCS Engineers at the US Composting Council’s largest event. You’ll learn about advances in compost manufacturing, compost utilization, and organics recycling which all benefit our members, society, and the environment.

January 24-27, 2022
Austin, TX

SCS is looking forward to meeting company and community representatives committed to composting, compost use, and organics management with the best regenerative practices and new hybrid approaches.

One SCS hybrid composting approach combines an ASP system with open windrow technology to achieve necessary process control while maintaining cost efficiencies. The design helped the Chittenden Solid Waste District solve the challenge of processing increasing tons of food scraps. As a result, its composting facility is now processing 8,200 more tons of food waste, and SCS helped identify financial support to adapt the existing infrastructure and processes.

Our staff provides comprehensive support – technology, best practices, higher quality yields, permitting, odor management, business planning, and how to find financing for sustainable operations.  We have decades of experience and expertise in serving public and private sectors – from New York City to San Diego.

SCS offers a Composting Pilot Program enabling waste managers and facilities to pilot test Aerated Static Pile (ASP) composting before making a capital investment.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:00 am

SCRRRA Launches Food Waste Compost Demonstration Project

July 21, 2021

Compost use helps produce lush green growth; the long-term benefits are even more impressive and expansive.

 

With support from the Town of Stonington, the Southeastern Connecticut Regional Resources Recovery Authority (SCRRRA) began a four-month food waste composting demonstration project at the Stonington Town Transfer Station on June 30, 2021.  The environmental consulting and contracting firm SCS Engineers is supporting the project.

SCRRRA currently manages approximately 135,000 tons of garbage for its 12 member municipalities (East Lyme, Griswold, Groton, Ledyard, Montville, Preston, New London, Norwich, North Stonington, Sprague, Stonington, and Waterford).  About one-quarter of the volume of garbage, or 33,750 tons, is organic waste.

The development of an organics facility could convert organic waste into a valuable organic soil amendment. The demonstration project is an integral part of a larger study that SCRRRA has undertaken to determine the feasibility of developing a commercial-scale food waste composting facility in Southeastern Connecticut.

Pilot projects such as this allow the region to quickly gather information about the collection and sources of organic materials, then test and refine a high-quality compost mix. The project also provides hands-on experience and can help spark innovative waste management practices.

Compost is produced using a mix of feedstocks, raw organic materials, such as leaves, wood, and food scraps. The composting process in the SCRRRA demonstration project uses wood mulch produced by SCRRRA at the Stonington Transfer Station and food waste supplied by two Connecticut companies Blue Earth Composting of Hartford and Willimantic Waste of Willimantic.

Communities across the U.S. report success diverting organic waste from landfills and producing a viable commodity with significant benefits, as the U.S. Composting Council describes in its Factsheet. For more information and outcomes from the SCRRRA project, contact SCRRRA Executive Director David Aldridge.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Keep watch for EPA’s grant applications to help reduce food loss and waste

July 15, 2021

EPA anticipates awarding up to $2 million in total AD funding. Individual projects could be in the range of $50,000-$200,000 for the funding period of two years.

 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is seeking applications on Grants.gov for projects from states, tribes, territories, and non-profit organizations to help reduce food loss and waste and divert food waste from landfills by expanding anaerobic digester (AD) capacity in the United States.

To qualify, EPA is asking that your project application achieve one or more of the following objectives:

  • Develop new or expand existing AD capacity for processing food waste.
  • Demonstrate solutions and/or approaches for increasing food waste AD utilization that can be replicated by other communities, governments, or other entities.
  • Support state, Tribal, and/or local government programs that seek to use AD to increase their food waste diversion rates.

State, local, Tribal, interstate, and intrastate government agencies and Non-profit organizations (as defined by 2 CFR Part 200) may apply. In addition, up to approximately $800,000 of the estimated total will be set-aside specifically for awards to the following organizations:

  • S. territories;
  • Tribal governments;
  • Tribal colleges and universities; or
  • Eligible organizations located in persistent poverty counties.

Applications are due by October 7, 2021. Additional information is available on the EPA site or by requesting grant assistance at .

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

WasteExpo 2021, Las Vegas

June 28, 2021

Save the Date!  WasteExpo 2021 takes place June 28-30, 2021, at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada.

WasteExpo’s sessions explore top industry trends, inspiring talks from a wide array of thought leaders and visionaries, and four half-day workshops on, Zero Waste Certified Training, Food Waste & Organics Diversion Program Development, Safety, and Recycling.

 

Don’t miss these informative WasteExpo sessions:

 

waste expo 2021Moderator Tracie Onstad Bills of SCS Engineers leads the discussions of Anaerobic Digestion: Technologies, Feedstocks, Successful Case Studies

Monday, June 28, 2021:11:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Room: N201-N204
Session Number: MORG211
/ CEU Credits:1
Tracks: Org Recyc&FRF Program- Organics Management Track

 


 

Patrick SullivanModerator Gary Bilbro leads Evaluation of Organics Management Options; Composting Odor Control; Equipment Maintenance including a feature presentation by Patrick Sullivan and Raymond Huff on the Comparison of Organic Waste Management Options in Terms of Air Quality and GHG Impacts. 

Raymond Huff

Tuesday, June 29, 2021:9:00 AM – 10:15 AM
Room: N201-N204
Session Number: TORG111
Tracks: Org Recyc&FRF Program- Organics Management Track

 


 

US EPA’s Claudia Fabiano moderates Strategies and Policies for Food Waste and Increasing Recovery in Municipal, Regional, and State Programs, featuring success strategies you can use.

waste expo 2021 locationFood Recycling and Rescue – Los Angeles County’s Three-Pronged Approach. Michelle Leonard, Vice President, SCS Engineers, and Judi Gregory, Go2Zero Strategies. CA

 

lisa coelhoCommunity-Based Social Marketing (CBSM) of Food Waste Reduction Program in Santa Clara County and Food Recovery Efforts Project in Central Contra Costa County. Lisa Coelho, SCS Engineers, CA

 

waste expoThe Significance of Strategies to Reduce Food Waste. Amber Duran, SCS Engineers. CA

Tuesday, June 29, 2021:10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Room: N209-N212
Session Number: TFRF211
/ CEU Credits:1
Tracks: Org Recyc&FRF Program- Food Recovery Forum Track

 


 

Panel Discussion on The Future of Organics in California includes SCS Engineers’ Tracie Onstad Bills, Evan Edgar, and Bill Camarillo. They will discuss California’s SB 1383 implementation that will require a 75% diversion of organic waste from landfills by 2025. These industry policy leaders and composters present an interactive panel discussion regarding the collection, contamination, permitting, and markets of transforming organic wastes into compost and energy products. This lively conversation will include questions from the audience on how to develop over 100 facilities at a cost of $2 to $3 billion.

Tuesday, June 29, 2021:1:15 PM – 2:15 PM
Room: N201-N204
Session Number: TORG311
/ CEU Credits:1
Tracks: Org Recyc&FRF Program- Organics Management Track

 


 

 

lisa coelhoModerator Lisa Coelho leads Organics Infrastructure Development, Investing Strategies, and Case Studies demonstrating the opportunities, diversion and utilization options, and feedstocks for meeting capacity needs of organic resource programs.

Tuesday, June 29, 2021:3:00 PM – 4:15 PM
Room: N201-N204
Session Number: TORG411
/ CEU Credits:1
Tracks:
Org Recyc&FRF Program- Organics Management Track

 


 

 

lisa coelhoModerator Lisa Coelho also leads Food Waste and Food Production: Best Management Practices, Circular Economy, and Corporate Social Responsibility, covering Food production, waste, and recovery best practices.

Tuesday, June 29, 2021:4:15 PM – 5:45 PM
Room: N209-N212
Session Number: TFRF511
/ CEU Credits:1
Tracks: Org Recyc&FRF Program- Food Recovery Forum Track

 


 

 

Join Moderator Regina Anderson of the Food Recovery Network and Tracie Onstad Bills for The Effects of Organics Diversion Policies onFood Donation and Food Waste Recycling Programs. Tracie will review the successful RecycleSmart Edible Food Generator Survey, for the Contra Costa County Solid Waste Authority.

Wednesday, June 30, 2021:11:15 AM – 12:15 PM
Room: N209-N212
Session Number: WFRF311
/ CEU Credits:1
Tracks:
Org Recyc&FRF Program- Food Recovery Forum Track

 

 

Visit the event website for details and registration information

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 8:00 am

USDA Announces $2 million for Community Compost and Food Waste Reduction Pilot Programs

May 19, 2021

big reuse
USCC 2020 Award-Winning Project Big-Reuse

$2 million in cooperative agreements is available for local governments to host Community Compost and Food Waste Reduction (CCFWR) pilot projects. The cooperative agreements support projects that develop and test strategies for planning and implementing municipal compost plans and food waste reduction plans. They are part of USDA’s broader efforts to support urban agriculture.

USDA’s Office of Urban Agriculture and Innovative Production will accept applications on Grants.gov until 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on July 16, 2021. Projects should span two years, with a start date of September 25, 2021, and a completion date of September 25, 2023.

Local governments may submit projects that:

  • Generate compost;
  • Provide access to compost to farmers;
  • Reduce fertilizer use;
  • Improve soil quality;
  • Encourage waste management and permaculture business development;
  • Increase rainwater absorption;
  • Reduce municipal food waste; and
  • Divert food waste from landfills.

NRCS will assist in conservation-related activities.

Priority will be given to projects that include economic benefits; provide compost to farmers; integrate other food waste strategies, including food recovery; and collaborate with multiple partners.

The deadline for applications is July 16, 2021.

 

Project Example: The Department of Sanitation of New York and nonprofit Big Reuse establishes food scrap drop-off locations while New York City Parks Department is diverting wood chips and leaves from landfill disposal to create compost. GreenThumb, Brooklyn Grange, Hellgate Farms, Gowanus Canal Conservancy, and other urban farms distribute the compost for food production in the boroughs of Queens and Brooklyn, diverting approximately 600,000 pounds of food scraps and green waste from landfills and providing 350 cubic yards of compost to food producers.

 

Get Started with SCS’s ASP Composting Pilot Program

• Low-cost opportunity to test ASP composting feasibility
• Ability to test different feedstock mixes
• Assess the quality of the finished compost
• Assess odor control and process control
• Test footprint is 5000 sqft or less on your site

 

Webinar
A pre-recorded webinar will provide an overview of the cooperative agreements’ purpose, project types, eligibility, and basic requirements for submitting an application. The webinar will be posted at farmers.gov/urban.

More Information
Questions about this cooperative agreement opportunity can be sent to .

The Office was established through the 2018 Farm Bill and is designed to be a USDA-wide effort. Representatives from agencies throughout USDA play a critical role in successfully servicing urban customers. Other grant and engagement opportunities are available in addition to the CCFWR agreements. More information is available at farmers.gov/urban.

Additional resources that may be of interest to urban agriculture entities include NIFA grants, FSA loans, and AMS grants to improve domestic and international opportunities for U.S. growers and producers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 11:51 am

SCS Engineers Expands Environmental Services in the Midwest

May 12, 2021

 

SCS Engineers is expanding its environmental expertise hiring Richard Southorn, PE and PG, as Project Director in the firm’s St. Charles, Illinois office. Richard is a Professional Engineer in 13 states and a Professional Geologist in Illinois and Delaware. He will support SCS clients with their coal combustion residual (CCR) and municipal solid waste projects, including facilities for composting and the safe management of hazardous wastes.

Richard D. Southorn, PE, PG, SCS Engineers-Chicago

As a Project Director, he runs teams providing comprehensive services ranging from construction plan development to full-scale design services. His client responsibilities include the coordination and supervision of the project teams made up of professional engineers, geologists, technicians, planners, and support staff.

Richard has expertise in developing site layouts and analyzing designs for multiple landfill facilities.  These designs fit within the comprehensive environmental services landfill operators need to manage these complex, integrated systems. Richard’s design approach for landfill infrastructure integrates the elements that all play a role in environmental due diligence, including the landfill base and final cover liner systems, leachate extraction and cleanout systems, landfill gas control systems, and stormwater management controls.

As a licensed Professional Geologist, Southorn also oversees geotechnical stability evaluations, stormwater modeling, and the design and evaluation of landfill gas systems that minimize greenhouse gases. He has overseen many hydrogeological investigations that characterize subsurface stratigraphy, hydrology and hydrogeology, protecting groundwater for safer and more efficient facilities.

As with all SCS Engineers employee-owners, Richard engages in industry associations and his community. Learn about Richard Southorn and how SCSs’ work protects all citizens

About SCS Engineers

SCS Engineers’ environmental solutions and technology directly result from our experience and dedication to industries responsible for safeguarding the environment as they deliver services and products. For information about SCS, watch a documentary, or follow us on your favorite social media. You can reach us at .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Ryan Duckett, President of the Virginia Chapter of the US Composting Council

April 30, 2021

 

The Virginia Composting Council is the state affiliate of the US Composting Council; its mission is to support the efforts and initiatives of the USCC and bring the practice of composting to more Virginians. The Composting Council is growing because of increased efforts by communities to divert food waste from disposal. Demand is growing with increased awareness of composting’s beneficial uses.

The Virginia Council, led by President Ryan Duckett of SCS Engineers, cites the obvious benefits of less waste going to landfills and lower greenhouse gas emissions in the environment. He also points out the jobs and business development potential and using compost for stormwater management, erosion control, and other green infrastructure as benefits. Expanded programs also offer the opportunity to collect edible foods for non-profits feeding many in need while diverting non-edible organics to composting.

The Council brings together manufacturers, municipal managers, organics collectors, researchers, and other compost allies in the waste industry. The group works to educate state regulators, local officials, and the public about composting’s value in a circular system. Members also help develop positions on regulations and legislation that affect composting and the market.

USCC has 13 state chapters that do local work to advance the composting industry alongside the national advocacy and programs. Without their on-the-ground education, attention to and work in regulations and legislation, and building networks of people in the industry, USCC could not be effective.

Learn more about composting.

 

Our congratulations to Ryan and the entire USCC for the help and support they bring to our communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

USCC Announces Award to Big Reuse, New York City Compost Project

February 16, 2021

big reuse
USCC 2020 Award-Winning Project

 

The 2020 Compost Awards recipients, nominated by peers were honored this year at COMPOST 2021, the USCC’s virtual conference. The 2020 Small-Scale Compost Manufacturer Award, given to facilities producing 10,000 tons or less, was awarded to Big Reuse, New York City Compost Project. Big Reuse operates two community composting facilities in NYC, one in Brooklyn and the other in Queens. Big Reuse redeveloped a garbage-strewn lot into an effective facility beneath the Queensboro Bridge on NYC Parks land. Big Reuse works with the New York City Department of Sanitation, community organizations, and NYC Parks to collect food scraps and leaves for composting. Big Reuse composts 2 million pounds annually.

How’d NYC solve the challenges of urban composting? Find out here.

 

Meet SCS’s National Expert Greg McCarron, PE and USCC Certified Composting Professional

Gregory McCarronGreg has 35 years of experience in all aspects of solid waste management, including composting and solid waste management plans. He is SCS’s national expert for organics management projects. SCS offers comprehensive services including the design, permit, construction, and operations of compost and anaerobic digestion systems and facilities for public and private clients. Greg’s expertise includes all of these services and regulatory support, economic analysis, and technology assessment.

Outside of work, Greg is the Compost Team Leader for a community garden in Bergen County, New Jersey. The garden produces about 1500 pounds of produce annually, which is 100% donated to soup kitchens in Newark and New York City. He also manages a backyard compost system for use in his own garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 12:09 pm

FREE Webinar: Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

January 18, 2021

landfill facility odor management

Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

 

FREE ON-DEMAND WEBINAR & Q/A – RECORDED JAN.21, 2021

 

Landfills, compost facilities, transfer stations, and renewable energy plants are cognizant of odor issues and strive to minimize odors. Proactive odor management is critical to the continued success and operation of these facilities.

More so than ever before, the solid waste industry faces complex and challenging odor issues based upon public, regulatory, and legal actions. Since odors are generally enforced through nuisance regulations, compliance can be difficult to achieve, not to mention almost impossible to define. Enforcement of odor nuisances is subjective, usually at the discretion of an environmental inspector or Air Pollution Control Officer, and often based upon citizen complaints. When citizen complaints mount, and enforcement action is leveraged, lawsuits often surface as an added ongoing challenge to waste facility operations. Now politicians are demanding action and using alleged odor violations as part of their environmental platforms. Facing odor issues can be costly and threaten the intended land-use designs that waste facilities require to serve their local communities.

SCS Engineers’ January webinar was for those who want to learn more about the proactive strategies and practices you can implement at your critical solid waste facilities. This free webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess the potential for odor issues and, by doing so, set realistic benchmarks toward cost-effective and meaningful mitigation measures.

Our panelists bring comprehensive expertise to the table, including facility design and planning, technical experience in air quality compliance and pollutant dispersion and air measurement programs, atmospheric dispersion and transport of airborne pollutants, particularly in the area of complex terrain. They will provide decades of strategies, resources, and best practices and technologies based on successful solutions that help support your facility as you prepare for, and likely will, experience odor complaints.

The team answers questions throughout the presentation, and the second portion of the program is devoted to Q&A and idea exchange.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

FREE Webinar: Staying Ahead of Odor Management at Solid Waste Facilities to Avoid Ramifications

January 7, 2021

Register for SCS Engineers’ January webinar to learn more about the proactive strategies and practices you can implement at your critical solid waste facilities. This free webinar will help you develop capabilities to assess the potential for odor issues and, by doing so, set realistic benchmarks toward cost-effective and meaningful mitigation measures.

Thurs., Jan. 21, 2021   

TIME: 2 p.m. ET

Click here to register

FREE LIVE WEBINAR & Q/A

Landfills, compost facilities, transfer stations, and renewable energy plants are cognizant of odor issues and strive to minimize odors. Proactive odor management is critical to the continued success and operation of these facilities.

More so than ever before, the solid waste industry faces complex and challenging odor issues based upon public, regulatory, and legal actions. Since odors are generally enforced through nuisance regulations, compliance can be difficult to achieve, not to mention almost impossible to define. Enforcement of odor nuisances is subjective, usually at the discretion of an environmental inspector or Air Pollution Control Officer, and often based upon citizen complaints. When citizen complaints mount, and enforcement action is leveraged, lawsuits often surface as an added ongoing challenge to waste facility operations. Now politicians are demanding action and using alleged odor violations as part of their environmental platforms. Facing odor issues can be costly and threaten the intended land-use designs that waste facilities require to serve their local communities.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am