landfill operations

Looking for a career where you matter? Greg Hansen has one!

January 27, 2023

SCS Engineers
At SCS, there is a focus on operations and field roles to support our clients. All companies and services are striving for increased efficiency, so those, like Greg Hansen, are playing a crucial role – they know how to maximize operations for success.

 

What is your title at SCS Engineers? Please briefly describe your responsibilities.
My title at SCS is “Regional Manager,” specifically Regional Manager of the Southern Coastal Region for Field Services OM&M. The Southeast Region was recently subdivided, and I am responsible for Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. My primary responsibilities include employee development, business growth and expansion, client relations, and asset management.

Why did you come to work here? What attracted you to SCS?
In 2007 I was looking for a career change. I was searching for a field where hard work and dedication would yield opportunities and a place where my work makes a difference. SCS presented me with an opportunity to do just that. I get to work every day with an amazing group of people on projects that protect and improve our environment.

What is your favorite part of working at SCS?
The overall work environment is my favorite part of working at SCS. SCS has created an environment where employees can succeed and are rewarded for hard work and contributions to client success. We openly share Ideas and information amongst the team, and the concept of “Our success is driven by client success” is visible in everything we do.

What has your career path been at SCS?
My career path at SCS is similar to many of the people I work with. I started with SCS in 2007 as an entry-level employee in the field. SCS provided me with the resources and guidance necessary to learn our craft; then, I was challenged to do it well. Over the past 15-plus years, I have been given opportunities and rewarded when I succeed. Working my way through the ranks has been rewarding and allowed me to appreciate all aspects of our work.

What do you look for when you are hiring in the field?
When hiring for field positions, humility, honesty, and drive are the most important traits. If a prospective employee has the attitude of wanting to learn and understanding it will take effort and time to become truly proficient, we have a winning combination. SCS has the resources and training programs to develop its employees continually. Finding people that enjoy developing and the challenges that come with it is key to our continued success.

What are your favorite hobbies outside of SCS?
Outside of SCS, I enjoy my time with my family. My daughter and I share enjoyment in golf and get to spend time together on the course. My immediate family also enjoys traveling to explore new places and visiting our extended family.

 

If you are looking for a great career that doesn’t mean sitting at a computer all day, see if the helmet fits at SCS!

 

 

 

 

 

Interview with Lindsay Evans.

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

ON DEMAND: How to Choose Landfill Operations Technology

January 18, 2023

SCS Engineers Remote Monitoring and Control Technology
Get a holistic picture of your waste and organics management operations at one, or many sites.

 

Compounded by rising labor and regulatory costs, landfill operations challenges for owners and operators are liquids and greenhouse gases. Gas collection and control systems, leachate management strategies, and treatment technologies all help create efficiencies. But so does new technology.

In our two-part educational series, we use case studies to demonstrate combinations of integrated SCADA, IIoT, drones, satellites, and Geographical information systems (GIS) technologies. Using clear, straightforward language, our panelists explain which technology is best for what and when integrating these technologies better serves your landfill’s and composting operation’s challenges and budget.

Recorded in front of a live audience who send questions to our panelists specific to their operational needs we cover monitoring, liquids, and labor challenges – with an aim to introduce new technologies that solve some of your most expensive challenges. SCS’s forums are educational, non-commercial webinars with a Q&A forum throughout; they are free and open to all who want to learn more about landfill and composting technology. We recommend these discussions for landfill and organics management facility owners/operators, technicians, environmental engineers, municipalities, and environmental agency staff.

View Part I focused on drones, satellites, and GIS technologies which are valuable for landfill permitting, design, and monitoring liquids and gas well conditions.

View Part II focused on SCADA and remote monitoring & control systems – when and why using real-time data can create efficiencies and reduce risk at your landfill and are useful for compost operations, and anaerobic digestors.

 

If you would like to join our mailing list for these monthly forums, please contact us at – SCS never shares or sells your contact information.

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

UW Madison Short Course: Solid Waste Landfill Design

January 16, 2023

SCS Engineers Vice President, Betsy Powers, is one of the industry leaders who will teach at the University of Wisconsin’s Solid Waste Landfill Design Short Course, March 27-30, at UW campus in Madison.

Learn about the critical factors of solid waste landfill design, operations, evolving industry issues, and economics. Learn from expert and diverse course faculty (top-flight researchers, owners at the cutting edge of evolving practice, industry experts). Get a firm grasp of the background and design specifics to compete in this industry, including industry-leading information on the principles and practices of solid waste landfill development, design, construction, operations, and management. Understand practical emerging technologies including:

  • financial management of solid waste systems and airspace management
  • polymer-based bentonite composites in geosynthetic clay liners
  • landfill gas containment and management for emission control and regulatory drivers
  • value-added design of gas-to-energy and gas-to-fuel projects
  • waste relocation and expansion
  • evolving issues with “hot” landfills
  • the latest in geosynthetic products for geoenvironmental engineering
  • performance-based and life cycle-based design

Betsy Powers will teach about Landfill Drainage and Runoff Control on Day 3 in the Evolving Topics in Landfill Management, Operations, and Risks Track.  Betsy will cover runoff amounts; open channel flow and culverts; and sedimentation/detention basins.

This course will guide you through the development process of a successful solid waste landfill, from cradle to grave. Industry experts will share critical factors and insights. Interactive discussion and idea exchange will be emphasized. It is intended for the gamut of industry professionals from civil engineers and landfill designers to landfill owners and operators, as well as local, county, and state regulatory agencies; public works professionals; facility managers; contractors and estimators; geosynthetic manufacturers and reps; planners; and everyone in between.

Qualifies for CEU and PDH credits.

Learn more and enroll today.

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 9:42 am

MDE Considering New MSW Landfill Methane Regulation

November 2, 2022

SCS Engineers Landfill Methane Capture

 

The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) is working to develop a new regulation aimed at reducing methane emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in the state. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) with a global warming potential over 25 times greater than carbon dioxide. The new requirements MDE is considering are modeled after similar rules in California and Oregon and would become among the most stringent in the US. MDE anticipates publication of the draft rule in December 2022, followed by public participation and finalization of the rule in the spring of 2023.

This proposed rulemaking has been several years in development and is consistent with Maryland’s GHG Reduction Act of 2009 and the recent Climate Solutions Now Act of 2022 that requires Maryland to become “net zero” for GHG emissions by 2045, with an interim goal of achieving 60% GHG reductions by 2031 (over 2006 levels). MDE estimates that once implemented; this rule could result in up to a 50% reduction in GHG emissions from affected landfills.

MDE presented initial details about the draft regulation (aka, the state plan) at the October 24, 2022, Air Quality Control Advisory Council and stakeholder meeting. The proposed rule would apply to smaller and mid-sized landfills. It would likely impact many facilities not currently subject to the EPA’s federal landfill air regulations under NSPS & EG 40 CFR 60 Subparts Cf and XXX and NESHAP CFR 63 Subpart AAAA. MDE estimates that 32 active and closed MSW landfills in the state will be subject to the proposed regulation.

SCS Engineers is tracking the proposed rule closely, so stay tuned for additional details once the draft rule is published.

For additional information on MSW regulations and GHG emission reductions, please visit scsengineers.com or one of SCS’s nationwide offices.

 

About the Author: Joshua Roth, PE, is a Vice President and Project Director with the Landfill Gas (LFG) Group in the SCS Reston, VA office. He has served on a number of LFG engineering projects involving LFG remediation system design, emissions inventories and air permitting, migration and odor control, ambient air sampling and reporting, LFG and CER due diligence projects, GHG emission mitigation and reporting, field sampling and assessments, and general emissions control projects.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 3:23 pm

2022 Colorado SWANA Annual Conference

September 26, 2022

The Colorado Rocky Mountain Chapter of SWANA its hosting its 2022 Annual Conference in Black Hawk, CO, October 11-13.

SCS Engineers Project Manager, Jeff Phillips, is presenting on
“Landfill Fire Mitigation Plan and Training” on Thursday, October 13 (1:15 – 2:45 pm)

Jeff’s AbstractFires are occurring with increasing frequency in the solid waste and recycling industry. While fires are certainly a serious safety risk to facility personnel and emergency responders, they also pose an administrative risk as facilities are struggling to keep or renew insurance policies.  Learn how developing a fire mitigation plan, and training that plan, can help prevent fires from occurring and keep them from escalating by identify gaps of knowledge, resources, and communication between facility managers and emergency responders. This presentation will provide an update on fires within the industry and present examples of fires within industry so that we can learn from other events (the good and bad). The presentation will also discuss the benefits of having a fire mitigation plan, the process of developing the plan and its components, the unique safety risks solid waste facilities pose to emergency responders, strategies to engage emergency response managers, and suggestions on how to “train the plan”.

The Conference will include exhibitors, networking opportunities, and a return of the popular Solid Waste Operations Safety Course.  Featured sessions will cover:

  • Landfill Design and Closure
  • Waste Diversion and Unique Waste Diversion
  • Landfill Fire Mitigation
  • Landfill Operator Roundtable discussion
  • PFAS
  • Beneficial Use of Solid Waste
  • Renewable Energy
  • Landfill Gas
  • Landfill Operations
  • Regulatory Updates
  • Scalehouse Technology Advances
  • and more!

Click for more details and registration information.  Hope to see you there!

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 5:56 pm

Expanding Landfill OM&M in Yolo County

June 16, 2022

SCS Landfill OM&M
Modern landfills take a holistic approach to landfill operations and monitoring to control gas emissions and produce renewable energy. As shown here, Yolo County uses biocover made of finished compost and a cement-clay-fiber composite to seal the surface. These strategies with landfill technology (inset) and engineered systems to control liquids and gases better allow biogas capture for renewable energy and a lower carbon footprint.

 

SCS Engineers is providing landfill gas (LFG) systems operations, monitoring, design, and management for the Yolo County Central Landfill (YCCL). SCS Field Services is SCS’s specialized landfill practice, providing operations, maintenance, and monitoring (Landfill OM&M) for Yolo County and over 600 landfills across the nation.

SCS Field Services identifies practical strategies to optimize the performance of landfill gas (LFG) systems and equipment while working on site. Optimized systems capture more gas.

Project Manager Mike Calmes leads the comprehensive team at YCCL, which has five closed waste management units, five active waste management units, and one under construction. Closed landfills continue generating gas, so active or closed, they all require oversight by these landfill specialists.

“The County understands the importance of preventative strategies using captured landfill data to create sustainable environmental controls. These keep landfills running as efficiently as possible and safely within regulatory compliance,” said Anton Z. Svorinich Jr., SCS Engineers Vice President, Regional OM&M Manager.

 

To learn more about landfill operations and engineering, visit SCS Engineers.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Reno County Hires SCS Engineers for Solid Waste Consulting

February 7, 2022

SCS Engineers Reno county facilities
New Reno County scalehouse and support facilities to be completed in 2022. Design by SCS Engineers and Mann & Co. Architects.

 

The Reno County Board of Commissioners approved contracting with SCS Engineers to support the County’s Solid Waste Department through 2024. SCS will provide environmental engineering, consulting, and field services for the Reno County Municipal Solid Waste Facilities for the next three years. The contract approval directly resulted from the firm’s experience, expertise, and long-standing relationship with Reno County.

SCS has a history of providing compliance, planning, and engineering services to Reno County. The firm helps the County continually comply with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and other agency regulations. Compliance activities throughout the year include groundwater and leachate sampling, laboratory analyses, permit renewals, air permitting, and associated report preparation in accordance with Kansas Administrative Regulations.

Landfills contain complex systems to protect the health of nearby communities and the environment. The County uses SCS professionals’ expertise and proprietary software for air quality and gas collection and control systems (GCCS) operations, monitoring, and maintenance (OMM). Reno County relies on SCS to maintain these systems and keep them in compliance to focus on their other operations.

These preventative services keep the landfills fully compliant with state and federal regulatory requirements while aligned with the County’s system performance goals and anticipated operational and maintenance activities.

In 2021 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) changed legislation regulating landfills, specifically the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and other air quality regulations. These changes significantly increased the monitoring, record-keeping, data management, and reporting tasks for many landfills across the nation, including the Reno County Facility. SCS has helped Reno County navigate these changes and will continue to facilitate changes as the County looks to expand its landfill in the future. Combined with the supply chain and labor shortages, the Solid Waste Department is securing its essential services from disruptions.

Steve Linehan – 2020 Waste360 40-Under-40 Recipient

Project Director Steve Linehan said, “SCS is privileged that Reno County entrusts us to partner with them to maintain the landfills’ safe and efficient operations. The Solid Waste Department supports the citizens and the environment; we’re honored to help.”

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 10:41 am

Utah SWANA Beehive Chapter Symposium 2022

January 31, 2022

Meet several SCS Engineers professionals at the SWANA Beehive Chapter’s 2022 Symposium in Springdale, Utah, March 16-18.

The symposium features plenty of networking opportunities, vendor booths, and presentations.

The Chapter is also offering a Manager of Landfill Operations (MOLO) training course, March 14-16.

Click for registration and symposium details

 

 

Posted by Laura Dorn at 11:33 am

Sam Rice, SCS Engineers – 2022 Waste360 40-Under-40

January 21, 2022

Sam Rice, SCS Engineers Project Manager

 

 

Congratulations to Sam Rice and Waste360’s 40-Under-40 awardees in 2022!

 

Sam’s contributions help the waste industry reduce environmental and health risks. His work improves the quality of life for workers in the industry and the communities surrounding our waste facilities.

Sam develops remote monitoring and control (RMC) SCADA systems that meet environmental management needs at landfills and industrial facilities. Operators can monitor and control their landfill equipment (e.g., flares, blowers, pumps, tanks, etc.) from anywhere using their phone or computer.

During COVID, he implemented RMC systems enabling operators to continue running essential services safely without physically traveling to the facility, and are especially valuable when facing labor shortages.

SCS is proud of our five candidates submitted for consideration this year. We’ve never submitted so many before; it’s a wonderful indicator of the talented professionals working at SCS, where company ownership spurs creativity and leaders. See our previous winners here.

 

Well done, Sam!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am

Demonstrating the Value of Landfill Gas Information Management

November 9, 2021

 

SCSeTools® – Developed by Landfill Gas Practitioners for Landfill Owners and Operators

The Birth of LFG Data Tracking

In the early 2000s tracking landfill gas data at facilities was anything but uniform, organized, or secure. The industry was using various methods to track data on paper forms and logbooks, then transferring it by hand into spreadsheets. Some of us used desktop database applications, but as the saying goes, necessity is the mother of invention.

From an SCS employee’s idea for demonstrating how to use landfill gas monitoring data to analyze and pinpoint system corrections, SCS DataServices® was born. In the span of several months, a team of SCS’s landfill engineers, field technicians, and technology gurus worked with client-needs to create a concept application visualizing collected landfill data on maps. Our staff field-tested it with good results, and SCS Field Services began using the application to visualize issues with wellfields that aren’t readily apparent when looking at spreadsheets.

A large SCS landfill client had seen our field staff using DataServices, asked if SCS would consider providing them with access to the application on a subscription basis. Our team adapted DataServices, added features, and continued improvements tailored for the client’s use.

As soon as secure data transfer became feasible, SCS moved to an Internet-based solution for our landfill gas practitioners. The platform called SCSeTools® holds the data collected by SCS DataServices®.

Applications and features roll out as we continually update and upgrade, incorporating ideas and improvements from our users and staff along the way. DataServices is addressing the landfill gas management needs of over 600 landfills across the US and Canada in 2021.

The keys to success follow our mission and values of maintaining close communications with our clients, field staff, engineers, and eTools support staff (all landfill gas practitioners), with the help of software engineers. Technology companies are not up at night thinking about landfill operations, but we are.

We introduce our SCS eTools landfill technology capabilities and a few of the creative and talented SCSers behind the technology in the next segment. Our speakers walk you through demonstrations of how over one-third of the landfill owners and operators in North America are increasing efficiencies using SCS eTools.

 

Visualizing Landfill Challenges – Shortcuts to Keeping Your Wellfield in Balance

DataServices shows the entire wellfield for any monitored parameters and zooms in on troublesome areas or wells. Results can be as simple or detailed as the landfill owners’ environmental and business needs dictate. The detailed examples here illustrate how graphs, maps, and charts help keep the wellfield in balance. We link each challenge to the description of a video demonstration.

In balance means extracting more gas for renewable energy, preventing odors and methane migration, keeps subsurface and surface conditions and workers safe. The information can help diagnose equipment conditions before they become costly, maintain regulatory compliance, and support cost estimates if the landfill is expanding or more infrastructure investment or equipment is needed.

Looking at vacuum distribution across a gas collection system – Select the system pressure map, which highlights vacuum distribution across the wellfield to show the wells with good (expected) vacuum, pressure drop over distance, and any wells unexpectantly losing vacuum.  Zooming in and changing the vacuum ranges further enhances where to assign staff to troubleshoot any identified issues.

Using a methane distribution map shows whether the wells are tuned to where the landfill owner wants them. Wells may be identified below the targeted range, indicating slight over pulling; a technician can use this map to identify such issues and quickly check the identified wells. Wells identified above the desired methane tuning range indicate wells not collecting enough gas, which has consequences. These wells can be the source of odors, leachate seeps, possible lateral migration to an out of waste probe. Not sending enough fuel to a power plant or atmospheric releases can affect surface emissions monitoring.

Managing liquids – Changing waste streams and more rainfall in certain areas of the country complicates liquids management. DataServices visualizes the impacts of liquids on wells and helps landfill owners better manage a proper liquids removal program.  The program will let them know how many pumps to budget for and, over time, where to relocate well dewatering pumps so that they are most efficient at removing liquids from landfills.

High-BTU Gas Plants –Filter maps help users locate wells contributing to gas dilution into renewable energy plants. It can help create punch lists for landfill staff to investigate, troubleshoot and tune. As wellfield technicians make corrections, they show on the map in real-time.

Temperature and subsurface oxidation events – Some call the condition subsurface fires, but this is a serious issue for landfills. Over-pulling wells, damaged infrastructure, and other conditions can cause oxidation events. Using a combination of temperature Parameter Maps to review wellhead temperature distribution and a Points Chart feature provides a deeper dive into the data. It provides more insight into which well or wells may be contributing to the high-temperature issues.

Locating a specific well – That’s not so easy when hundreds of wells surround you and at larger landfills. DataServices had built-in filter features to identify a single monitoring point on a wellfield map easily.

Customizing for compliance, best practices, and rules – DataServices allows monitoring points across a single site to have customized rules for each monitoring point. Rules can be for regulatory purposes, standard operating procedures, best management practices, and even site-specific preferences or any combination thereof. It is efficient to customize rule application to landfills and collection points – meaning wells, probes or ports, horizontal collectors. This customization capability helps organize and confirm regulatory compliance. It is especially salient with the 2021 EPA and state compliance changes for a single landfill or an organization with hundreds of landfills.

MobileForms – Inspection forms, blower flare station monitoring forms, load tracking from municipalities, incoming hazardous waste tracking, MRF bale counts are examples of paperless entry available. The data feeds directly from mobile phones to the supervisor and into the maintenance department, so staff can start cataloging and looking at what’s going on in real-time at several types of facilities. It’s available for regulators and inspections and helps reduce staff hours tabulating and centralizing the information.  Any information historically captured on a form or log attached to a clipboard can now be captured and stored electronically.  From there, it can be recovered and produced as a PDF export file or data from the forms used to trend data and help make informed operational decisions.

MobileTools – DataServices in a condensed format suitable for mobile devices. Field staff use MobileTools to save time formerly used to return to the office, transfer/transcribe the collected data and upload it to a supervisor for quality checks before storage.  Technicians can now recall the last 20 readings for any given well and review trend graphs on their phones or tablets while standing adjacent to the well they have questions about and need to access the data.  MobileTools also allows them to upload field data such as liquid level readings while the data is being collected.  The information instantly populates into DataServices and is available for review by others on the project team.

The most valuable tools are in development now for release in 2022. ARC GIS integration developed under SCS RMC® will further enhance DataServices with even better visualization and location capabilities and provide enhanced features such as allowing landfill owners to see their well as-built information and view subsurface information about their wells.

 

Learn more at SCS Engineers, where we adopt our clients’ environmental challenges as our own.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 2:38 pm