Tag Archives: leachate management

Determining if Deep Well Injection is a Viable Technology for Your Facility

June 17, 2019

Understanding the entire range of wastewater management and disposal alternatives can be a daunting task, particularly as increasingly stringent surface water discharge standards take effect or as zero discharge facilities find the management of their waste liquid needs changing over time. Former solutions are no longer options or may be too costly. One alternative that is rapidly gaining traction is deep injection wells.

Deep well injection is a viable leachate management option in many parts of the United States, yet it is often screened out as a possible alternative due to a lack of understanding of the technology or gross misconceptions about its acceptance or applicability. The purpose of the Monte Markley’s paper The Basics of Deep Well Injection as a Leachate Disposal Option  is to present the basic technical, economic and regulatory considerations of deep well injection as a technology a facility should evaluate when considering the applicability of geologic sequestration of leachate.

Technical criteria discussed are potential disposal volumes, geologic suitability, chemical compatibility, pre-treatment requirements, and leachate chemistry. The economic considerations are evaluated based on the technical criteria noted above, management of public perception/relations, current leachate management expenditures, the service life of the asset and risk to develop accurate capital, O&M costs, and return on investment. Regulatory considerations include the role of state vs. federal primacy for each state, the general stance of regulatory acceptance in specific areas of the United States,  and a discussion of the permitting process and typical reporting requirements.

These key considerations are then integrated into an overall suitability evaluation that an owner can utilize to accurately determine if deep well injection is a viable option and, if so, how to educate other stakeholders and manage the process of implementation as a project moves forward.

About the Author: Monte Markley, PG, SCS Engineers

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:01 am
Tag Archives: leachate management

State vs Federal CCR Rule Regulations: Comparisons and Impacts

March 28, 2019

World of Coal Ash in St. Louis, May –13-16, 2019 event details.

When the Federal CCR rule went into effect in 2015, it was a new regulatory layer on top of a widely varying landscape of state regulations affecting CCR management in impoundments and landfills. Some states already had significant regulations on the books for CCR impoundments and/or landfills, while others did not. Where state regulations existed, they varied widely from state to state. While a few states have moved toward closing the gap between state and federal CCR requirements, many utilities continue to face confusing and conflicting requirements coming from different regulatory programs as they move ahead with managing their CCR facilities.

Through case studies, SCS Engineers will share state-versus-federal regulatory challenges utilities have encountered in different regions of the country during landfill design and management, impoundment closure, and groundwater monitoring and reporting since the implementation of the Federal CCR Rule. For example, some sites have completely distinct groundwater monitoring programs under state versus federal rules, with different well locations, well depths, and monitoring parameters for the same facility. We will highlight unique approaches to bridging regulatory gaps and resolving regulatory conflicts between state and Federal CCR requirements.

SCS will also share insights gained on the long-term potential for regulatory resolution of these issues based on discussions with state regulators in multiple states.

Speakers:

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: leachate management

Minimize CCR Landfill Leachate and Contact Water Management

March 21, 2019

World of Coal Ash in St. Louis, May –13-16, 2019 event details.

Learn how to minimize leachate and contact water management at coal combustion residual (CCR) landfills using good design, physical controls, and operational practices. Through our presentation of case studies, you will learn how to assess leachate and contact water management issues and implement techniques to minimize leachate and contact water management at your landfill.

Leachate management and contact water management at CCR landfills can be expensive, cause operational headaches, and divert valuable resources from other critical plant needs. Our presentation will provide you with useful tools to ensure your landfill is designed and operated to effectively reduce leachate and contact water and alleviate operator stress. We will present case studies that highlight how design features, physical controls, and operational practices have effectively decreased leachate and contact water management at CCR landfills.

Speakers:

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: leachate management

SCS Advice from the Field: Maximizing Leachate Pumping System Performance after Expanding Landfill Footprint

February 13, 2019

 

Evaluating the performance of any existing pumps along with new pumps when a lateral expansion is designed ensures optimal performance with minimal wear on the pumps.

 

Regulatory and siting restrictions are such that many solid waste operators prefer to expand their existing landfill footprint as much as possible instead of finding a new disposal footprint at a different location. As landfills are getting larger in height and greater in footprint area, the location of leachate tanks, leachate ponds, or discharge points to an on-site or off-site leachate treatment plant usually does not change. A larger footprint means leachate force mains are getting longer forcing the existing pumps to work harder to push leachate through the system to a target point. Some operators carry on with the same pumps for decades and do not monitor the performance of the pumps after expanding the landfill footprint, which could be more costly in the long-term.

Pumps on the primary and secondary risers at a disposal cell leachate structure.

Hydraulic Evaluations for Lateral Expansion
The longer leachate force main with possibly additional bends in the line increases friction in the line and causes flow rates to reduce to unexpected levels. We recommended that landfill operators evaluate the performance of the existing pumps along with new pumps when designing a lateral expansion. Such an evaluation may require hydraulic analysis of the entire network of pipes along with pumps, or only the segment of the network affected by the expansion. However, the effort is minimal in comparison to the operating costs of inefficient flow and overtaxing the equipment.

Sometimes the results of a hydraulic evaluation may require up-sizing all or specific pumps in leachate sumps because not enough flow can go through the force main due to high friction loss in the expanded leachate force main. Up-sizing pumps may be achievable depending on the type of the leachate sump, i.e., riser system or vertical manholes. If the up-sized pump in a riser system is too long to fit inside a riser system, or so long that it makes routine maintenance too cumbersome, your engineer may consider enhancing the functionality of the design.

Booster pumps on a network of leachate force mains before connection to an off-site discharge line.

Inline and Offline Pumps
Booster pumps located along an expanded leachate force main can certainly be an option. Booster pumps can be the inline or offline type. Install the inline pumps on the actual force main, and position the offline type on the side so that liquids go through bends and elbows to reach the pump, and again through bends and elbows to get back in the force main. In either case, the booster pump adds hydraulic energy to the flow inside the force main to push the liquids at a compensated pressure through the remainder of the force main and to the target point.

Operators need to be aware of the dynamic nature of the leachate piping network and the role of booster pumps in the dynamic environment. Changes to the flow in the force main may change following a landfill expansion when the new cells are coming online increasing leachate generation. Alternatively, after closing portions of the landfill slopes, that decreases leachate generation over time. Sometimes booster pumps have to be up-sized or downsized depending on the flow and pressure in the system.

A junction of leachate force mains coming together from various operations.

Optimizing Performance, Reduce O&M Costs
The cost of replacing pumps, up-sizing, or downsizing, is insignificant compared to the revenue that landfills generate. Proper adjustment of the pumping system keeps the entire network operating at the appropriate range of pressure, and velocity in the line; increasing the life of the pumping system. Less wear and tear on the system produces a reduction in maintenance costs along with less equipment downtime.

Lower maintenance requirements may also reduce the number of personnel required to keep the system in operational condition. Landfills with a large pumping system employing a second technician because of the high maintenance of multiple pumps may find a single technician sufficient for the upkeep of the system. Proper sizing of pumps and operating the pumping system as designed within the evaluation parameters can significantly reduce the cost and frequency of pump maintenance.

 

About the Author:  Ali Khatami, PhD, PE, LEP, CGC, is a Project Director and a Vice President of SCS Engineers. He is also our National Expert for Landfill Design and Construction Quality Assurance. He has nearly 40 years of research and professional experience in mechanical, structural, and civil engineering.

 

Landfill Engineering and Leachate Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: leachate management

Minimize CCR Landfill Leachate and Contact Water Management – EUEC 2019

January 24, 2019

 

EUEC 2019

 

At EUEC 2019 learn how SCS can minimize leachate and contact water management at coal combustion residual (CCR) landfills using good design, physical controls, and operational practices.

Through this SCS presentation of case studies, you will learn how to assess leachate and contact water management issues and implement techniques to minimize leachate and contact water management at your landfill.

Leachate management and contact water management at CCR landfills can be expensive, cause operational headaches, and divert valuable resources from other critical plant needs. Our presentation will provide you with useful tools to ensure your landfill is designed and operated to effectively reduce leachate and contact water and alleviate operator stress. We will present case studies that highlight how design features, physical controls, and operational practices have effectively decreased leachate and contact water management at CCR landfills.

2019 EUEC in San Diego, February 25-17, 2019. Conference details here.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: leachate management

Minimize CCR Landfill Leachate and Contact Water Management

December 21, 2018

Learn how to minimize leachate and contact water management at coal combustion residual (CCR) landfills using good design, physical controls, and operational practices.

Through this SCS presentation of case studies, you will learn how to assess leachate and contact water management issues and implement techniques to minimize leachate and contact water management at your landfill.

Leachate management and contact water management at CCR landfills can be expensive, cause operational headaches, and divert valuable resources from other critical plant needs. Our presentation will provide you with useful tools to ensure your landfill is designed and operated to effectively reduce leachate and contact water and alleviate operator stress. We will present case studies that highlight how design features, physical controls, and operational practices have effectively decreased leachate and contact water management at CCR landfills.

2019 EUEC in San Diego, February 25-17, 2019. Conference details here.

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: leachate management

SCS Advice from the Field: Minimizing CCR Landfill Water Management Costs

May 10, 2018

 

Learn how to minimize leachate and contact water management costs at coal combustion residual (CCR) landfills using good design, physical controls, and operational practices. Through the SCS use of case studies, you will learn how to assess leachate and contact water management issues and implement cost-saving techniques at your landfill.

Leachate management and contact water management at CCR landfills can be expensive, cause operational headaches, and divert valuable resources from other critical plant needs. The SCS presentation at USWAG will provide you with useful tools to ensure your landfill is designed and operated to cost-effectively reduce leachate and contact water and alleviate operator stress. We will present case studies that highlight how design features, physical controls, and operational practices have effectively decreased leachate and contact water management at CCR landfills.

SCS Engineers – Serving Utilities Nationwide

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:03 am
Tag Archives: leachate management

Liquids Management – Wastewater Solutions

October 17, 2017

SCS Engineers offers innovative, cost-effective wastewater solutions supporting leaders in solid waste, construction, manufacturing, and mining overcome their liquids management challenges. Click to read and share our interactive brochure, or click directly to your industry below:

Landfill Leachate Engineering
Our innovative use of landfill assets and technology means we can provide superior upstream solutions to reduce leachate production, as well as cost-effective downstream solutions for leachate management and treatment. We also offer a powerful tool for tracking and analyzing leachate information from multiple data collection points. SCSeTools® Leachate Module enables our clients to evaluate disposal trends and effectively manage disposal costs.

Dewatering Contaminated Sites
Our responsiveness, experience on large and complex projects, and strong relationships with regulators means our clients can avoid costly delays on construction projects, where contaminated groundwater is discovered.

Industrial Wastewater Pre-treatment
We deliver comprehensive solutions for our clients’ industrial wastewater pre-treatment requirements, from feasibility studies to permitting, designing, operating and monitoring treatment systems.

Deep Well Injection
We have extensive experience in providing this often overlooked but highly effective solution for treating and managing liquid waste.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:00 am
Tag Archives: leachate management

10 Tips for Preventing Landfill Leachate

July 18, 2017

Hot off the Press at Waste360.com

Article and Slideshow of Landfills using these Best Practices to prevent leachate. Click Hot off the Press to view.

Posted by Diane Samuels at 10:27 am
Tag Archives: leachate management

SCS Top 10 Upstream Measures to Prevent Landfill Leachate Generation

July 5, 2017

Landfill operators are seeking new means to dispose of leachate generated at their facilities more economically. Rising costs of leachate treatment at publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) obliges landfill operators to look for alternative disposal means at a lower price. These situations encourage landfill operators and consultants to do more with less when designing preventative solutions to reduce leachate generation in the first place.

Upstream measures to reduce leachate generation range from standard operating procedures to innovative ideas with significantly high benefit to cost ratios. SCS compiled a list of our Top 10 measures to consider, including:

1. Grading – Creating landfill plateaus to maximize rainwater runoff toward perimeter storm water ditches, using low permeable soil to seal landfill slopes that will not receive waste for an extended time.

2. Caps & Covers – Using temporary geomembrane caps over areas that will not receive waste for a long time. Constructing final cover over landfill final slopes to eliminate rainwater percolation into landfill.

3. Swales – Constructing temporary and strategic swales on landfill outside slopes to capture rainwater runoff before causing soil erosion on the slope and to convey runoff water to perimeter ditches.

4. Berms & Downchutes – Constructing temporary berms and swales on landfill slopes that drain toward new disposal cells to capture water before reaching waste in the new cell and directing water to perimeter ditches. Also, constructing a berm at the crest of slopes to minimize the flow of rainwater runoff over slopes that are causing soil erosion. Constructing engineered temporary and sturdy downchutes for rainwater runoff from top areas of the landfill to the perimeter ditches.

5. Tarps – Installing rain tarp over a portion of a new cell that will not be in service for some time.

6. Exposure – Minimizing exposure of the active face while the remaining areas are properly graded to shed rainwater runoff to perimeter ditches.

7. Shedding – Grading the top area of each lift to shed rainwater runoff to outside slopes and the perimeter ditches.

8. Plantings – Installing sod or seeding on exterior slopes and those interior slopes that will not receive waste for an extended time to reduce soil erosion.

9. Roads – Constructing ditches adjacent to access roads to safely convey runoff water to the bottom of the slope – pitching access roads toward the ditch adjacent to the road, and building a proper road surface to minimize erosion during severe storms while lasting long under traffic loading.

10. Maintenance – Establishing routine maintenance protocol for the aforementioned measures because regular maintenance sustains long life and performance.

 


 

For facilities outside the landfill area, special measures, such as using floating covers on leachate ponds or canopies over operations that could potentially generate leachate without the canopy, also help reduce leachate generation.

Upstream measures are not necessarily limited to our Top 10 list but depend on the type and extent of operations at a facility. The will of the landfill operator and the expertise of the solid waste engineer can go a long way to reducing leachate generation at landfill facilities, and we all strive for that.

 

More about Liquids Management including case studies.

 

 

 

Posted by Diane Samuels at 6:03 am
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